Things You Need to Know About Working Abroad

15 Things You Need To Know About Working Abroad

    Are you interested in working abroad ? If you’re going to move to a new country for a job, make sure it’s not just a good opportunity, but also a great employer that offers you a favorable employment contract.

15 Things You Need To Know About Working Abroad
15 Things You Need To Know About Working Abroad

3. Know What You’re Getting Into

    “In Europe you’re often expected to give employers three months notice before leaving a position. So if you become an employee in the country you’re in—not a U.S. employee on an international assignment—be sure to
discuss how long your assignment or position abroad may last. Have that quite clear from the beginning,” suggests Armstrong.

4. Understand Your Visa Conditions

    “Remember that, depending on which type of work visa you have, you may have to return to your home country if you resign or are fired. You often cannot look for a job elsewhere after you arrive,” explains Katie Morgan, who taught high school and performed social work during her time in the U.K. Each country has varying types of work visas, so research the regulations around the one you’ll be under. Typically, employers take responsibility for obtaining a work visa due to the complicated processes involved (and if your employer isn’t guiding you, be wary). That said, you’ll still have to fill out plenty of paperwork, so have your pen ready!

    A different country means different tax laws and banking practices, so do your homework to avoid surprises. Most notably, get a clear answer as to whether you’ll be a U.S. employee on assignment or if you’ll become an employee in your new country The affects how much of your income you’ll be taxed on in the U.S.

5. You Must File Taxes With the U.S. IRS

    “Before we went to Germany, an accountant already living overseas told us we’d be paying German taxes and wouldn’t have to pay U.S. taxes for the same work up to a certain threshold of income,” shares Tim Thorndike. “What we weren’t told was that we still had to file with the IRS to show that we had paid German income tax. We didn’t find that out until five years after moving and ended up paying both the German Finance Office and the IRS for those years,” he laments.

6. You Might Have a (Very) Hard Time Getting Credit

    “Getting credit can be very difficult in a new country, so before you leave your home country, get a credit card with an international company. Transferring that card will be easier than getting credit once you’re there,” explains Peter Morgan, who learned this lesson the hard way. “My company finally had to step in, writing a letter to vouch for me. Even then it was still at the discretion of the credit card company whether I’d get one.”

7. Banking Can Get Complicated

    “Research how to set up an account abroad. Look into local banks’ minimums, timing on transfers, fees and online capabilities. And make sure to get a reference letter from your U.S. bank,” suggests Lindsey Wilsnackwho lived in Panama for two years with her husband and kids.

It’s easy to focus on the professional aspect of your move, but don’t forget about the personal and social aspects of your life. Follow these tips for relating to locals and finding your new crew.

8. Seek Out Fellow Expats

    “To make friends, start with a hobby you enjoy where you could meet other people. I personally went to Zumba classes to just get out in a way where I could naturally be with and meet people who had common interests,” says Katie Morgan. “You can often find local expat websites focused on arranging meet-ups.”

9. Get Acquainted With Local Pop Culture

    “Read pop culture magazines and watch their popular shows before you get there. You’ll get a better understanding of their humor and local lingo,” Katie Morgan adds.

10. Prepare For and Soften the Language Barrier

    “Before moving, gain some basic conversational skills so you can navigate necessities right away,” suggests Wilsnack.

    Katherine Stevens-Ridge, who has worked for her current employer both in the U.S. and the U.K., agrees: “My biggest learning point has been interpreting slang and accents in the office. I can get lost in translation at times, but I’m picking up English slang slowly. You know, bits and bobs!”

11. Use Your Extended Network

    “Reach out to anyone you know—and anyone that group knows—who has been to your new country ahead of you, whether they are in the same profession or not. They may offer professional insights or even introduce you to potential friends,” says Katie Morgan.

 

12. Start the Visa Process Far in Advance

    “This will not happen overnight. The forms took almost a month from filling them out to having the visa in our hands. So as soon as you accept a position, be proactive about starting the visa process,” says Stevens-Ridge.

    “This is not something you can do last minute. Make a list of what must be original and notarized, so you don’t slip up there,” suggests Wilsnack.

13. Pack Lightly

    “Even if your company offers to move all your belongings abroad, I recommend bringing as little as possible. I brought my things with me and immediately felt very weighed down by having it all there. Many of my expat friends rented furnished flats, and it seemed a lot easier than having all this stuff to keep track of and move,” relates Armstrong.

14. Figure Out How You’ll Get Around

    “If you plan to drive, find out how long your home country’s driver’s license is valid in your new country before you have to take a test,” says Katie Morgan.

15. Don’t Forget Your Visa While Traveling

    “Make sure when you go back and forth between countries, you pack not just your passport with your visa but also your visa’s accompanying paperwork, or you may not be admitted,” says Peter Morgan.

Moving abroad for work takes careful preparation, and this, of course, is just a short list of to-dos. If you’re really contemplating international work, be sure to do plenty of research on the country and company and talk to others who’ve made the same move. But for many, all that hard work is worth it. As Maher puts it, “It’s pretty great if you’re open-minded, outgoing and enjoy traveling.”

 

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Look Confident In An Interview

5 Ways to Look Confident in an Interview

Ways To Look Confident In An Interview
Ways To Look Confident In An Interview

    After the long, exhausting journey of searching for and applying to new jobs, you’ve just been rewarded with a golden ticket—an interview.But after a brief moment of celebration, the panic sets in: Your heart is already pounding, your palms are beginning to sweat, and you’re wondering: Are hiring managers like sharks—can they smell fear?If the thought of sitting across from a hiring manager makes your stomach turn, you’re not alone. But don’t let your nerves get the best of you! Try one these strategies that will help you feel calm, cool, and collected—or at least make you appear that way.

 

1. Just Breathe

    While waiting to be greeted by your interviewer, take a few moments to do some breathing. (Yes, like a pregnant woman in labor!) By doing this, you can redirect the troublesome emotion you’re experiencing (e.g., nervousness or fear) and be able to focus on something else (in this case, the amazing job that you’re hoping to land). Holistic health expert Andrew Weil, MD praises breathing exercises, saying, “Since breathing is something we can control and regulate, it is a useful tool for achieving a relaxed and clear state of mind.”

    To do this most effectively, take a deep breath through your nose (really feel your stomach expand) and then slowly blow it out through your mouth. Repeat this three times, while concentrating on centering your thoughts. The best thing about this technique is that you can do it anywhere (and quite unnoticeably), so if you feel your nerves start to swell during the interview, simply take another breath.

2. Don’t Fidget

    Nervous fidgeting is one of the most telltale signs that you’re nervous, so this is an incredibly important skill to master. My go-to trick is to keep my hands clasped together on the table or in my lap to avoid any subconscious table tapping, hair twirling, or otherwise noticeable squirming. I’m also a leg-shaker—but keeping my hands in my lap and applying a bit of pressure to my legs helps remind me to keep the shaking to a minimum.

    If you think you don’t have any fidgety habits, you might want to think again—most people aren’t aware of their own nervous tendencies because they’re such an ingrained part of their natural behavior. To double check, try doing a few mock interviews with a friend who can call you out on any fidgeting. Once you know exactly what to avoid, you can practice controlling it.

 

3. Make Eye Contact

    One of the best ways to fool a hiring manager into thinking you’re more confident than you feel is to keep steady, natural eye contact throughout the interview. Mary Griffin, a Human Resources Director for a national healthcare company says, “A key giveaway of a nervous Nellie is a lack of direct eye contact—looking down, looking away, and not looking the interviewer directly in the eyes. A more confident interviewee appears to be engaged with the interviewer.”

    One way to remind yourself to make regular eye contact is to focus on a spot between the interviewer’s eyes. You can even imagine a colorful bulls-eye there—whatever it takes to keep your eyes from wandering too much.

    On the flip side, you don’t want to stay so intensely focused on making eye contact that you end up sending out a creepy vibe! So remember to take natural breaks, like looking down at your resume every once in a while. It’s a balancing act, so just keep practicing until it feels comfortable.

 

4. Press Pause

    Some of us (myself included!) tend to ramble when we’re nervous. This can be dangerous because once we start talking, it’s incredibly easy to veer off topic and say more than what’s needed—or worse, more than what’s appropriate.

    To preempt any rambling, I try to answer each question with only one thought or idea at a time. For example, if you’re asked to describe a trait you disliked about a previous supervisor, you could say, “I found that her tendency to micromanage conflicted with my productivity.” Then stop. This will save you from unnecessary add-ons like “She was a total control freak whose inability to let me make my own decisions made me want to run down the hall screaming obscenities”—even if that may be the most honest answer.

    The key to mastering this technique is to keep your tone sincere, so that even if your responses are brief, they don’t come off as curt or dismissive. It’s more about sticking to one main topic per question instead of going off a nervous tangent. And don’t worry—if the interviewer wants you to elaborate on a certain topic, she’ll ask.

 

5. Think Positively

    Finally, calm your nerves by reminding yourself that you deserve to be there. Hey, you wouldn’t have been invited to interview if you weren’t being seriously considered as a candidate! Use this knowledge to your advantage to mentally pump yourself up before the interview. It can take the edge off enough to allow you to approach the situation with a burst of self-assurance and poise.

    Most importantly, remember that while you certainly need to be calm, collected, and confident in order to score the job, an interview is not a life-or-death situation. Hiring managers are humans, too—and they’ll understand and forgive a few minor nervous blips.

 

So with that in mind, relax, gather your strength, and walk into that interview with a newfound confidence (at least on the outside!).

Before Leaving don’t forget to check

8 Useful Tips To Prepare For Job Interview

Make Your Resume Unique with 7 Simple Steps

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How To Answer Behavioral Interview Questions

Behavioral job interview questions are based on the premise that past behavior is the best predictor of future behavior – and that’s why they are so often asked by employers when assessing candidates during a job interview.

These types of competency-based interview questions typically begin with the phrase, “Tell me about a time when…” – and if you’re able to understand the specific requirements of the role before your interview, you’ll be much better prepared to predict these kinds of questions and think about how you’ll answer them.

THE CAR PRINCIPLE

The golden rule when you’re answering behavioral interview questions is to adhere to what’s called the CAR principle: Context, Action, Result.

Context is about describing a situation and setting the scene for a relevant example. The key here is to choose your example well – one that clearly demonstrates the quality or skill the employer is asking about.

Action is about explaining what action you took. Be really specific rather than making vague statements and outline your steps and rationale.

Result is about detailing the outcome of your action. Offer specific facts relating to the result. For instance, quote figures and statistics that back up your declaration.

Remember these three steps to answering behavioral interview questions and you’ll be well on your way to thoroughly impressing your interviewer.

CAR IN ACTION

Q: Tell me about a time when you helped to turn around your team’s sales performance.

Context: “One of my previous employer’s sales divisions had been experiencing decreasing sales – so I was brought in to help reverse the situation. My challenge was to manage the team effectively so they were able to actually exceed (not just meet) their sales targets.”

Action: “Over a six-month period, I introduced several initiatives within the team, including: setting specific and measurable sales targets for each individual within the team; introducing weekly sales meetings for the team and for each individual within the team; and implementing a structured sales training program.

I also conducted market research to identify what our main competitors were doing, set up focus groups with major clients to establish key goals, and introduced a new remuneration system that linked sales performance to remuneration packages.”

Result: “We lifted sales by 60% and exceeded sales targets by 25% in the first quarter, and continued the upward trajectory throughout the next year.”

SAMPLE BEHAVIOURAL JOB INTERVIEW QUESTIONS

Your ability to answer behavioural interview questions can make or break your attempt to secure that dream job – so we’ve put together some sample behavioural interview questions to help you more adequately prepare.

Communication

“Give an example of a time when you were able to build rapport with someone at work, even in a stressful or challenging situation.”

“Tell me about a time when you had to give someone constructive criticism.”

“Give me an example of how you were able to use your ability to communicate and persuade to gain buy-in from a resistant audience.”

Teamwork

“Give me an example of a time when you had to cope with interpersonal conflict when working on a team project.”

“Tell me about a time when your fellow team members were de-motivated. What did you do to improve morale?”

“Describe a situation where others you were working with on a project disagreed with your ideas. What did you do?”

Problem-solving

“Tell me about a difficult problem you were faced with, and how you went about tackling it.”

“Describe a time when you proactively identified a problem at work and were able to devise and implement a successful solution.”

“Have you ever faced a problem you could not solve?”

Creativity

“Tell me about a situation in which you worked with team members to develop new and creative ideas to solve a business problem.”

“Describe the most creative work-related project you have completed.”

“Give an example of when your creativity made a real difference in the success of a product or project.”

Organisation and planning

“Have you ever managed multiple projects simultaneously? What methods did you use to prioritise and multi-task?”

“What specific systems do you use to organise your day?”

“Describe a time when you failed to meet a deadline.”

Analytical skills

“Describe a situation where you had to interpret and synthesise a large amount of information or data.”

“Give me an example of a recent roadblock and your logic and steps in overcoming it.”

“What was your greatest success in using logic to solve a problem at work?”

Integrity

“Give an example that demonstrates your professional integrity.”

“Tell me about a time when you had to stand your ground against a group decision.”

“Have you ever had to work with, or for, someone who was dishonest? How have you handled this?”

Accomplishments

“Describe some projects that were implemented and carried out successfully primarily because of your efforts.”

“What are three achievements from your last job that you are particularly proud of?”

“What has been your most rewarding professional accomplishment to date?”

By preparing yourself in advance and familiarizing yourself with these and other sample behavioral interview questions, you’ll be primed and ready for any number of behavioral questions that may come your way.

Source: http://bit.ly/22LeN0C

The 5 “Must Knows” of Job Interview Preparation

You’ve impressed an employer with your resume and they called you to schedule an interview. You’re ecstatic. Now, it’s time to get over the ecstasy and start preparing for the interview.

How do you prepare properly? Follow these five “must knows” of interview preparation:

Know Yourself. You got the interview, so you must have already communicated much of this in your resume and cover letter. Now, think about how you’ll describe yourself. What truly sets you apart from other candidates? What’s your “personal brand”? What are the strengths you bring to the job? Also, be prepared to answer typical and atypical interview questions. What are your career goals? Why do you want to leave your current employer? How can this job help you accomplish your career goals?

Know Your Resume. The interviewer has painted a mental picture of you by reading your resume and cover letter. Be sure you have a copy to refer to as you prepare for the interview. Since your resume should be targeted at the job description, you need to look for the parts they might ask questions about. For instance, you may have written about an accomplishment from a previous job that is not fresh in your mind but is critical to the position you’re seeking. So, jog your memory for some details that you can cite during the interview. CareerBuilder.com recently asked about 3,000 hiring managers about interview blunders by job candidates, and 30% said “not offering specific answers to interview questions” was a common and detrimental gaffe.

Know the Company. Go into an interview without having researched the employer and your candidacy may well be dead before your seat turns warm. With all the information available on the web, and the rise in importance of networking, you have no excuse for not knowing important data about the company before you walk into the interview. Fortunately, we’re getting better at this, according to a recent Accountemps survey of senior executives with the nation’s largest companies. The survey found that about four of every five executives (79%, to be exact) said candidates either somewhat or very frequently demonstrate knowledge of companies during interviews. That’s up from 59% in 1997.

Know What You Want to Ask. Close to half (48%) of the CareerBuilder survey base named “appearing disinterested” as a common interview faux pas among candidates. To demonstrate your interest, prepare two lists: questions whose answers you need to know and another of what you want to know. Which questions go where? That depends on what you feel is crucial to deciding whether you might want to take the job if it’s offered.

Know Your Interviewers. If the hiring manager or would-be boss is interviewing you, get to know about them, namely, their managerial styles, how they might react in a hypothetical scenario, such as a pressing project deadline or an unexpected drop in revenue. If you know the names and roles of your interviewers ahead of time, find out about them through their bios on the company web site (if they’re available) or through a web search. Gain a sense of what it would be like working for and with these people.

Source: http://bit.ly/2C7Dlxi

5 Types of Decision Making Skills You Need To Know

 

Every workplace needs people with different types of decision making skills. All workplace decisions, both big and small, require a decision making process. Even if you do not realize it, you’re using some type of decision making process every day.

 

There are many different types of decision making processes, not all of which are explored here. For example, “Emotional” is a very common decision making process, used by people that make decisions based on how they feel.

 

There are some types of decision making that are both common and valued in the workplace. Those are the ones we’d like to highlight here.

The following are several examples of decision making, and an example of how you might use it in the workplace.

Intuitive – Intuitive is one of the simplest, and arguably one of the most common ways to make a decision. It should be noted that it is not always the best way. Intuitive decision making involves relying on the decision that feels right, without necessarily thinking about the logic that goes into that choice. An example may be deciding to use a software because you like it after a few minutes, rather than comparing it to other types of software and determining which is the better value.

 

 

Rational – Rational decision making is the type of decision making most people want to believe they do. It is the act of using logic to determine what is best, by reviewing all possible options and then evaluating each option using logic and rationality. An example would be listing out all possible marketing methodologies, along with budgets, data, and more, and then working out which one(s) would provide the best investment.

 

 

Satisficing – Satisficing is accepting the one that is satisfactory for the needs of the company. A non work example would be deciding you need coffee, and then going to the nearest coffee shop even if it’s not the best, simply because you get the job done. It means you may miss out on better options.

 

 

Collaborative – Collaborative is exactly as it sounds. Rather than make a decision yourself, you collaborate in some way to make the decision. An example might include meeting with others to get their input, voting on the final decision (although that may integrate other types of decision making models), or, otherwise relying on the group as a whole.

 

 

Combination – Not all decision making falls into a simple bucket. Many people use a combination of these different types of decision making styles. For example, rational and intuitive may be easily combined. The person doesn’t necessarily use any data, or create any logic charts, but they think about the decision from a logical perspective and then go with their gut on the final decision.

 

 

Understanding your preferred decision making style will help you prepare answers to interview questions.

Source: http://bit.ly/2ExTcqp 

ROLE OF WORK EX IN MBA ADMISSIONS

 

 

 

Here is my article on the role of work experience in getting a student into a good MBA College.
Few common questions have been answered in this article.
Hope you find it useful.

So, is it advantageous to have work experience prior to commencing on the MBA journey? The question is straightforward but the answer is not. Duration, job role, industry/sector of work all contribute to the experience becoming an asset or a liability.

 

1.First things first- why MBA?

 Although the question might seem redundant, it is essential to understand the perspective of those already  having  jobs. Quitting a job and pursuing MBA would have the following cost implications:

  1. The existing flow of income would stop. Most flagship MBA courses in India are 2 years long. This would mean a gap of 2 years between the last and next pay cheques.
  2. A significant investment in course fees and living expenses. Many MBA students apply for educational loans, thereby creating financial obligations for the future.

 

 

2.What is the significance of the work experience in the MBA process?

 

  1. MBA entrance exams: It is tougher to prepare for MBA entrance exams in parallel with your job . Work means a break from academics coupled with a restricted amount of time for preparations. Consequently, those having jobs have to exhibit greater tenacity and focus to gear themselves for entrance tests.
  2. Selection into top colleges: This is one aspect where having work experience generally favours the applicant. IIM Bangalore, for example, has a 5% weightage for experience. Therefore, a person with experience can get through with a score lower than a fresher’s.
  3. The actual MBA coursework and campus life: Work experience obviously endows one with specialized domain knowledge. This practical perspective is useful in both theory-based coursework as well as projects based on market scenarios. Further, campus life provides a tremendous opportunity for personal growth. Those who have gone through the churn of corporate life appreciate this aspect better.
  4. The MBA jobs: Companies treat 0-18 months of work experience as a single category. Companies offer similar job profiles to these students. It is relevant to discuss the concept of ‘lateral placements’ here.

 

 

3.How Important is My College GPA After few Years of Work Experience?

 

With 3-5 years of work experience, you can present essay content that demonstrates the deepening and broadening of your professional skills and experiences, reinforcing the idea that you have matured into a highly effective and impactful young professional and that you are no longer defined by your undergraduate performance. Ideally, your GMAT score should be strong, which will also reinforce these ideas.

Strive to secure recommendation letters that emphasize this same message. Some candidates take business courses after college at a reputable institution, building an “alternative transcript” that provides evidence of their current abilities.

 

 

4.What do the Admissions Committees look for in a candidate’s Work Experience?

 

          3 Aspects Admissions Committees Look For In Work Experience

Think about the amount of time a B-school has in hand to judge your application… just 1 or at the most 2 hours to know who you are and what your potential is. In such a situation, your work experience comes to their rescue. AdComs turn to your work experience to quickly know what you have been doing over a period of time and what domain expertise you bring to the table.

  1. Pedigree of the company you worked with:

Are you working with Google or Microsoft? If yes, great! If not, no problem. This is because Admissions committees do understand that not everyone gets into a Google or a Microsoft. Yes, though it’s true that a big brand does leverage your chances of getting into your dream B-school, the good news is that even if you are working for a start-up, your application will not be rejected solely on this basis.

However, if you are working for a small brand, you should be able to quantify your performance, roles and responsibilities and precisely what value addition you brought to your employer.

  1. How well did you perform at work?

There is something even more important than the brand name of the company you work with and the number of years of experience you have.Now, is there any standard or norm to appraise this? Your performance is directly related to the number of promotions you got.

If you are able to show a couple of jumps, this adds a lot of weight to your application.

 

  1. Roles and Responsibilities:

You may be a great software engineer, doing a great job assigned to you.
However,Was your job restricted only to IT coding?
Or were you also involved in the cross-functional and cross-cultural roles?
For instance,
Did you work in other functions also such as pre-sales, functional consultancy etc?
Have you worked, studied or traveled abroad?
Even if you have not worked abroad, have you undertaken any such project where you had to deal with foreign parties?
Are you a person who can appreciate and work with people from other cultures?

Remember, this holds true for professionals belonging to other industries also, not just IT. It is very crucial that you provide precise quantifiable information that will demonstrate your initiative to take more challenges and responsibilities and show your excellence in these.

 

REAL QUESTION : SO DOES WORK EX REALLY MATTER?

 

The straightforward answer is YES. Let me explain it to you with a real life example.

The whole idea of MBA is developing your Management and leadership skills and use them in real (mostly but not only business) world. Therefore you are supposed to study many business courses like Finance, Marketing, Economics etc in  a B School.

Now consider two individuals. One is fresher and the other one has a work ex of let’s say 5 years. The fresher let’s assume (and he will be) brilliant in academics and hence will grasp the concepts easily. However what do you actually mean by those concepts, how do they affect in day to day lives, that understanding cannot come without work experience.

For example – you want to become captain of a hockey team, first of all you need to play hockey and then only you can become a captain. Similarly if one becomes a Manager without work ex, he or she will be like a hockey captain who has been to a nice bschool but hasn’t played hockey ever.
THANK YOU FOR READING

BY MR. KAILASH SHAHANI

 

5 Critical Mistakes that Could Destroy Your Career

This is that time of the year when many of us start to review our career; this usually starts with an audit of the past year — we review our goals, what we achieved and what we didn’t, and career highlights from the past year. It is then followed by setting resolutions and career goals for the new year. While there is nothing wrong with setting goals and making career resolutions for the new year, it is important that your career plans for this new year is made with a focus on one thing: mistakes to avoid.

If you want to achieve your career goals this year and have a much successful career than in previous years, you need to avoid these mistakes. Making one or more of them could destroy your career:

1. Ignoring Relationship With Co-Workers and Higher Ups

Most people wrongly assume that their career progression depends on their IQ and academic qualifications. This is very far from the truth. While these could have gotten you a job, you will need much more than that to have a progressive career.

According to Law Settlement Funding, “By far, one of the most important things if you want to move up in your career is to have a good relationship with your co-workers and superiors. In fact, this is often reported to be more important than other factors. If, on the other hand, you are not on good terms with co-workers and superiors and you think ‘it is just enough to do an excellent job,’ don’t be surprised if you are out of a job soon enough.”

2. Not Getting Enough Sleep

Many people sacrifice sleep in the belief that it is required to achieve their career goals and objectives. Not only is this not true, but it can be very dangerous. Besides the fact that lack of sleep has been linked to psychopathic behavior (and remember, not being able to get along well with employees and higher-ups can destroy your career), research actually shows that not getting adequate sleep does not necessarily give people the performance boost they assume they are getting. Instead, getting inadequate sleep (less than six hours daily for an adult) leads to the same effect as being drunk: it diminishes your performance and reduces your cognitive abilities.

So, if sleeping less is part of your plan to achieve your career goals, it could diminish your performance and reduce your cognitive abilities. It could also lead to you making career-damaging mistakes (since you could be operating on the same level as a drunkard).

3. Diversifying Instead of Focusing

While many will advocate “diversifying” as key to success, focus is what really makes a great career. Putting a lot of focused, undivided attention into being the best at what you do will lead to you having a stronger career than diversifying your efforts and energy into a lot of things. In fact, an analysis of the billionaires on the Forbes 400 list found that the majority of these billionaires got to where they are by being focused on one thing and reaching the peak of their career in the area of their focus. If you take a look at people at the top of your industry you will most likely notice the same thing.

“Diversifying” could limit your career trajectory. It could even destroy it. If you’re an accountant, for example, you will stand a better chance career-wise getting your CPA than learning to bake as a “side skill.”

4. Limiting Yourself by Not Networking

If you want to move forward in any industry, networking is the rule of the game: networking allows you to be aware of more opportunities, to connect to more people in your industry and to know about how things work beyond just your workplace.

Don’t make the mistake of limiting yourself by not networking — not only could it limit your growth potential, but it could make you redundant and potentially negatively affect your career prospects. Instead, network by attending industry conferences and events and connecting with people in other organizations similar to yours.

5. Not Being Careful About Your Social Life

Of course, it used to be that (for the most part!) what you do in your private life has little bearing on your career. Not anymore. In the age of social media and super fast information transmission, especially where most information posted online remain there permanently, not minding what you post on social media could not only cost you your current job, but it could also cost you future jobs and prevent you from moving forward in your career.

Being careful about what you post on social media should be paramount on the list of steps you take to advance your career — ignoring this rule could affect you beyond just this year. It can affect your career prospects forever.

Source: http://bit.ly/2EV84fm 

8 Habits of Employees That Get Promoted

Getting a promotion takes more than just doing your job well. To move up the ladder to the next step if your career, you have to prove to decision makers and leadership that you are ready and deserving enough to take on more responsibility. This takes consistently working your best, staying dedicated to your work, and much more.

If you’re sick of being passed up for promotions, check out these eight habits of employees that get promoted. Make small changes as necessary if you’re ready to take the next step in your career.  

1. Set and Communicate Career Goals
Be goal-oriented

Before the start of the year, sit down with your boss to set and discuss your professional career goals. Be open about where you see yourself 6-months or a year. A good boss will help you achieve these goals by giving you opportunities to grow and provide support to keep you on track.

“In many cases, he or she truly does want to see you achieve your goals. As a manager myself, I constantly ask my employees ‘Where do you see yourself in five years?’—because if there’s a way I can help them along, I’ll do it. Whether that means putting in a good word for them in a different department at my current company or assigning them specials projects that will help them build new skill sets for a different role, I want to help,” says Katie Douthwaite Wolf, The Muse contributor.

They key, says Wolf, is to avoid announcing plans to “jump ship or that you want to take over your boss’s position.” Instead, think bigger and broader and come ready to discuss the ways you think your boss can help.

2. Always Be a Team Player
Be collaborative

Employers don’t like when employees are focused on “I” rather than “we.” They want team players who are committed to helping the greater good of the team, which ultimately benefits the company:

“A good employee volunteers his or her efforts before even being asked. They volunteer for more tasks and responsibility, and not just because of immediate reward,” according to the guide, How to be Promotable. “This type of employees simply goes above and beyond and will be the first thought of when promotions are being decided.”

3. Make Yourself Indispensable
Be irreplaceable

How can you make yourself an indispensable member of your team? One way is to become the go-to person for something specific, like designing dynamic sales decks to dealing with challenging customers. People in positions like this are not only sought after by coworkers, but also seen by leadership because they naturally stand out as someone people are always looking for.

4. Keep Learning
Take initiative

Show your boss that you’re committed to continuously improving and developing your skills by finding learning opportunities, both within the office and outside of it. This doesn’t mean you need to get your Masters or PhD, unless that’s relevant to your job. Instead, enroll in one webinar each month, use your own money to attend conferences, or ask to be put on projects outside of your department. This shows that you’re serious about your career, and aren’t waiting for someone else to get you where you want to go.

5. Document Your Success
Advocate for yourself

When asking for a promotion, leadership is going to want to know what kind of value you bring to the business. Rather trying to think back at all you’ve accomplished, build a “working” portfolio throughout the year. After you’ve completed an important project or performed a record sales month, document it. When noting your successes, focus on the most important details:

“Keep a record of everything you do that enhances the company’s bottom line, that puts the company or your department in a good light, that is creative and innovative, and that shows your loyalty and commitment to the organization,” says Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D.

This tracking shows that you’ve been successful and improved the company, and are invested in the work you’re doing.

6. Don’t Be Afraid to Take Charge
Show leadership potential

Do you display passion, trustworthiness, decisiveness and confidence? Possessing these types of leadership skills is essential for getting promoted. After all, the first step in being a leader is acting like one. Don’t get involved in office politics or develop bad habits, like being late or missing deadlines. Leaders need to be great role models for the employees they manage and work with, and without these skills, it will be hard to get a management promotion.

7. Network with the Right People
Stay connected

Take advantage of every networking opportunity you have, even if it’s a small get together with new co-workers at lunch. Networking with others within your organization and otherwise will allow you to get to know the people who can provide support now and in the future. It’s also a chance to promote yourself and your skills as well. You can reap similar benefits by getting involved with groups in your organization, like those who help plan events or keep the office stocked.

8. Be an engaged employee
Get involved

Being engaged goes beyond paying attention or taking notes in meetings—both of which are also important. It means being an active member of your organization, attending every optional  “Lunch and Learn” or coming up with new ideas for sharing successes in the workplace. This shows your commitment to the company and the success of your co-workers.

Get Promoted This Year

Getting promoted is not an easy task—it takes time, learning and dedication to yourself and the business. Successfully manage your own career path by using these eight tips—you might just get that promotion you’ve been hoping for.

Source: http://bit.ly/2E7LL98 

7 Ways to Get Recruiters & Job Offers to Come to You

Did you know that you don’t have to spend hour upon hour trying to find a job, and that you can do things that will have potential employers approaching you instead? Yes, this is a reality for many people, but it isn’t something that just happens. You have to work at it, and you need to market yourself in a way that is going to make you very desirable to potential employers. Today we are going to take a look at seven ways to get recruiters and job offers to come to you, instead of the other way around.

1. Start Networking

It is true that a lot of people aren’t hired because they filled out a job application or sent in a resume. They are hired because they have connections, people that they network with who are able to help them in their career search. Now is the time to get out there and network with everyone you know, from friends and family to former coworkers, employers, professors, etc. The more networking you can do, the better off you will be in the long run. Let everyone in your network know that you are looking for a job, and make sure that they are well aware of your education, skills, and experience. If they think you are a fit for a certain job, they won’t hesitate to recommend you.

2. Build Your Brand Online

“You are your own brand, and you need to build that brand and promote it as much as possible. It is important that you start building your brand online, because this is where employers are going to be looking for potential employees,” suggests Dima Midon, an expert from TrafficBox. Use all of the online tools at your disposal, particularly LinkedIn, which is a professional network that allows you to really promote yourself as a professional, and someone who is an expert in your field. This is a great tool for job seekers. Make sure that you keep your profile up to date, especially when it comes to contact information, so when an employer searches you, they will be able to contact you if they are interested in learning more.

3. Create a Professional Website

Let’s say that you have already applied for a job that you really want. The employer is going to want to learn as much about you as possible, and they are usually quite impressed when they see that candidates have their own professional websites. Your website is basically an extension of your resume, where you have the opportunity to really expand on your education, skills, experience, and knowledge. You can include samples of your past work, your portfolio, contact information, and a lot more. Make sure that your resume is up to date and included as its own separate section of your website, and also include your LinkedIn profile. Consider trying a platform like Squares peace to get started!

4. Keep on Applying for Jobs

Even if you are waiting for employers to start seeking you out, don’t stop applying for other jobs while you are waiting. After all, you could end up waiting for a long time, and you don’t want to be out of work and not able to pay your bills just because you are waiting for the perfect job to come along. Remember, most people who apply for jobs are rejected at least 15 times before they actually receive an offer of employment. Figure out what you have done wrong at the other interviews, and keep on applying until you get it right, and get the job offer you really want. The only real problem this is going to cause is that you could end up with several job offers, and have to decide which one you are the most interested in.

5. Dress for the Job

You may not have the job yet, but you should always be dressed as if you do. If you are interested in a certain type of profession, you should dress for that profession on a regular basis. Don’t run to the store looking sloppy. This could be just the time when you end up running into someone in your network, a potential employer, etc., and they are not going to see you at your absolute best. Another bonus to dressing for success is that the better you look, the better and more confident you are going to feel. It is particularly important to dress for the role when you are meeting employers for interviews, applying for jobs, etc. You need to look the part for every type of job you are interested in.

6. Don’t Badmouth Former Employers

The last thing a potential employer wants is an employee who badmouths their former employers. For one thing, no one likes to have someone around who is constantly complaining about something. You need to have a positive outlook, and as the saying goes, if you don’t have anything nice to say about someone, don’t say anything at all. One of the most common job interview mistakes that many people make is saying bad things about their former employers. Yes, you do have to be honest about why you are no longer employed by the company, but you need to find ways to put a positive spin on things.

7. Let Recruiters Know You are Open

Let’s get back to LinkedIn. It isn’t just enough to have a LinkedIn profile. You need to let recruiters that you are “open”. There are several ways that you can do this, including having your phone number and email address in the summary section (many recruiters don’t bother going any further than the summary, so you need to give them what they are looking for). Make sure your profile has a professional head shot photo. If you have a silly photo, or none at all, it is going to make potential employers think that you are not going to be professional and take your job seriously. Also, make sure that your profile is “on” so they know you are available.

Source: http://bit.ly/2EgrVWi  

7 Tips to Hire Best Candidates in 2018

 7 tips to hire best candidates in 2018

 

If you are a smart recruiter, then finding the right candidate for your organization is not hard to find. Hiring right talent – even in a competitive job market – becomes easy with well-thought out strategies. Top recruiters spend time formulating sound recruitment tactics which are both efficient and effective in procuring the best and the brightest employees. Here are some tips for hiring best candidates in 2018.

 

Use of Technology:

Technology plays a key role in improving the overall efficiency and effectiveness of the hiring process. Recruiters often use technology to select appropriate candidates, reach out to them easily and most importantly, fish the best out of the lot.

 

​Cross industry hiring:

Organisations are now looking for talent who can apply specialist knowledge in a generic industry. People who can use their experience to make a better tomorrow will be in demand and hence, cross industry hiring will receive a lot of fillip.

 

Power of review:

Employer review platforms – such as Glassdoor- offer an unbiased and clear picture to job seekers about their dream companies. The new generation of job-seekers extensively research prospective employers before they make a career move. Hence recruiters should pay attention to their employer brand and concerns surrounding it.

 

Use of analytics:

Today, recruiters are flooded with data pertaining to a variety of topics. This includes talent catchment, candidate preferences, performance of candidates on board, reasons why candidates refuse offers, and so on. Analytic support is becoming extremely crucial to decide which candidates to go after and how to keep them engaged.

 

Going social:

While job portals are the most preferred hiring medium for nearly 55% organisations, social media hiring is also gaining importance, revealed a recent study done. With significant penetration of Social Media – both in business and employees’ personal and professional lives – social networking is becoming a key source to tap diverse talent pool.

 

The mobile revolution:

More companies will develop apps that help schedule and record time and attendance, aid employee engagement, create digital to-do lists, productivity trackers and complete a range of other tasks. These apps will have the ability to access data stored in the cloud and be accessible from multiple devices. A smart recruiter must make use of these apps to save on time and resources.

 

Catch them young:

On the campus hiring front there has been a steady increase in the number of Pre-Placement Offers (PPOs). Year 2018 may see offers being rolled out to students who intern or do projects even in their second year of college. Hence keep a watch on the campus relevant to you.