Keys To A Successful Job Search

7 Keys To A Successful Job Search

7 Keys To A Successful Job Search
7 Keys To A Successful Job Search

1. Keep your resume short and succinct

Despite reports of its impending demise, the experts said a resume is still very much an essential tool of the job search. But hiring managers (and the computers they use to sort through resumes) are in a rush. So you need to format your resume to be read quickly and in small bites. These days, a typical resume is scanned for just six to 10 seconds, often on a mobile device.

Eliminate filler words, use numbers to quantify your impressive results (such as “boosted sales 83 percent”) and include relevant keywords that appeared in the job posting.

Limit your contact information to just one email address (old-fashioned AOL, no; contemporary Gmail, yes), one phone number and your LinkedIn profile URL.

2. Create a portfolio of job-search documents

Want a way to distinguish yourself from the crowd of applicants? According to the Career Brainstorming Day pros, many job seekers are supplementing their resume with collateral leadership briefs, blogs that establish their robust online professional identity and, among senior-level managers, one-page executive summaries.

3. Consider hiring a coach to perfect your video interview skills

More employers are relying on Skype for long-distance and initial screening interviews. As a result, more job seekers are using coaches to help them excel in video presentations.

4. Dive deep into LinkedIn

Over the past few years, using LinkedIn to find work has gone from a good idea to essential. Having a sharp LinkedIn profile may be even more important than having a great resume.

Nonetheless, the experts said, all too many job candidates fail to fully embrace this tool, especially older job seekers. To maximize the use of LinkedIn, engage more frequently with your LinkedIn networks. One of the best ways to do this is to actively participate in LinkedIn’s industry and interest groups.

5. Use Twitter and other forms of social media to attract the attention of employers who are hiring

According to the white paper, “employers will move from using external recruiters to an internal hiring process that will depend heavily on identifying prospective employees through their online presence and through referrals of existing employees. Personal websites, social media presence, development of subject matter expertise and a well-defined personal brand will be the requirements for gaining the attention of prospective employers.”

6. Limit the amount of time you spend on job boards

As Next Avenue has noted, job boards are one of the least effective ways to get hired. The Career Brainstorming Day experts said it’s generally only worth applying for a position through a job board if your resume matches 80 to 85 percent of what an employer asks for in a posting. Job seekers continue to be frustrated by computerized Applicant Tracking Systems that scan applicants’ resume for keywords. This finding underscores the importance of direct, targeted search with networking as its core component as the most important method for finding a job.

7. Start your search sooner rather than later

The hiring process has been growing longer, with more steps and delays between the time people apply for jobs and receive offers.

It helps to approach a search as though you are in sales: keep building your network pipeline,don’t let your momentum flag and expect to hear “no.”

All is not doom and gloom, though. The report says career professionals are finding “growing demand for workers” and that businesses are worrying about losing managers and other key talent. I hope they’re correct.

 

source : https://goo.gl/k81g2r

Top 9 Mistakes to avoid at Job Interview

  Top 9 Mistakes to avoid at Job Interview

Top 9 Mistakes to avoid at Job Interview
Top 9 Mistakes to avoid at Job Interview

    As anyone who has been in a job search for a while knows, being invited to a job interview is not something easily achieved. Becoming one of the few “job candidates” rather than being part of the usually gigantic crowd of “job applicants” is a major victory. Unfortunately, too many job candidates blow their interview opportunities, wasting all that time and effort. Don’t be one of those candidates. What you do during a job interview is viewed as a “sample” of your work. Everything you do is being judged because they don’t know you. So don’t make the following mistakes.

1. Appearing uninterested

   This drives employers crazy. Most employers have more applicants than they need or want. If you aren’t demonstrably interested in them, they certainly aren’t interested in hiring you.

 2. Being unprepared.

    Obvious lack of preparation is an opportunity crusher. And, lack of preparation usually becomes obvious quickly.

3. Sharing TMI (too much information)

    Sometimes, people have a whole-truth-and-nothing-but-the-truth mindset in a job interview, so they “spill their guts” in answer to every question. Not smart or useful!. I’m not recommending telling any lies, but I am recommending that you avoid boring the interviewer and blowing an opportunity by sharing too much information. If they want more details, they’ll ask.

4. Negative body language

    If you never smile, have a limp handshake, and don’t make eye contact with the people you meet at the employer’s location, and especially with the interviewer, you’ll come across as too shy or too strange or simply not interested.

 

 5. Not having good questions or asking the wrong questions at the wrong time

    To an employer, no questions = no interest. Number one, above, indicates how deadly that is to your success with the opportunity. As bad as having no questions is asking the wrong questions. During the first interview, asking questions only about raises, promotions, vacation, and benefits are not usually well-received. Those questions apparently indicate that you are just interested in specific personal benefits rather than the job.

6. Being angry

    If you were laidoff, fired, or ended your last job unpleasantly, you may feel very angry. Whatever the reason, dump the anger before the interview, at least temporarily.

 7. Not collecting contact information or asking the next-steps questions.

    Many job seekers leave the interview(s) with no idea of what will happen next in this employer’s hiring process. They also often don’t know who is the best person to contact as well as when and how to contact that person.

8. Failing to follow up.

    Often, job seekers leave at the end of the interview(s) with a sigh of relief that the interview is over, and they can get on with their lives. They leave, and wait to receive a job offer.

9. Forgetting the interview is a two-way street.

    Don’t go to the interview thinking that you are the only one trying to “make a sale.” You need to ask questions to help you discover if the job, the people you would be working with, and the employer are what you want. You also need to decide if you would be happy working there for at least one year.

 

source : https://goo.gl/VaJQxe

TIPS TO MANAGE YOUR BODY LANGUAGE AT INTERVIEWS

8 TIPS TO MANAGE YOUR BODY LANGUAGE AT INTERVIEWS

8 TIPS TO MANAGE YOUR BODY LANGUAGE AT INTERVIEWS
8 TIPS TO MANAGE YOUR BODY LANGUAGE AT INTERVIEWS

    Whether you’re going to your first job interview, you’re out of practice, or you’re generally nervous about interviews, make sure your body language doesn’t give away your fear and apprehension. Stay aware of these general body language tips that can help you through your interview process.

1. Take control of your posture

As you enter the venue for your interview, make a conscious effort to have good posture. Stretch your back, talk long strides, don’t droop your shoulders, and keep your head high. When you enter with confidence, chances are you’ll deliver and exit with confidence, too.

2. Smile, and make eye contact

    Hold the person’s attention and present a pleasant personality. Practice your smile beforehand. You don’t want to force a smile. Your smile and non-creepy eye-contact is what will make your audience engaged in the discussion and comfortable in the interaction.

3. Practice Power Pose

    In  TED talk, social psychologist Amy Cuddy says, “Power posing — standing in a posture of confidence, even when we don’t feel confident can affect testosterone and cortisol levels in the brain, and might even have an impact on our chances for success.” She suggests taking this pose two minutes before the interview.

4. Be alert

    Don’t slouch or tuck your limbs close to your body. Sit in an erect posture, with your spine aligned to the back of the chair. “But don’t take this to the extreme,” cautions Mark Bowden, author of Winning Body Language, over at Monster.“Elongating your legs or throwing your arm across the back of the chair can make you appear too comfortable, even arrogant.”

5. Have a grip

    Have a solid grip when you are shaking hands, and don’t let the fingers slide away; at the same time it’s not an arm wrestling match — you don’t need to have a ferocious grip. Practice your shake in advance with a friend or relative to know what feels right.

6. Observe your surroundings

     Don’t blindly follow the recruiter or your interviewer into the interview room. Look around. If you see people looking at you, make eye contact, nod slightly and acknowledge their presence, break into a small smile or say hello. You never know who that person is — they could be your future colleague, manager, or the next interviewer! Even while waiting at reception, you don’t want to appear too self-engrossed and disinterested in the people around you. Many managers check with the reception staff about your behavior and interaction with them.

7.  Make yourself comfortable

    If you need some water, get it yourself or ask the interviewer to help you. You can’t continue an interview with a parched throat or a breaking voice. If you need something in your hands to keep you focused, consider holding a pen. You could also use the pen to take notes during the discussion if required — so keep a pad handy, too. If you are too fidgety, you will distract your interviewer, taking her focus off your reply.

8. Leave your mark

     Don’t be in a hurry to leave, but at the same time don’t continue to keep sitting in your chair even after the interviewer has communicated the completion of the interview. Time yourself to get up with your interviewer and gather your belongings carefully, without any rush. Even if you drop a few things, stay composed. If you’re comfortable — but only if you’re comfortable — make a joke to ease the situation. If the interviewer is holding the door for you, thank them. If you’re exiting first, hold the door open for the interviewer (if they’re leaving, too). You don’t want the door banging on their noses as you leave!

 

source : Link To Source

The Top 12 Soft Skills Employers Seek

The Top 12 Soft Skills Employers Seek

The Top 12 Soft Skills Employers Seek
The Top 12 Soft Skills Employers Seek

    Depending on the organization or business, employers are seeking key skills and experience for each job. But even though these skills are extremely important, there are certain “soft skills” that employers also look for when hiring people for their organization. Research has shown that a person’s “soft skills” can be just as good of an indicator of a person’s job performance as the hard skills that they possess.

Here’s a list of the 12 soft skills that employers look for when hiring.

1. A Positive Attitude

    A positive attitude can do wonders in turning a department or company around. Having employees who possess a positive attitude can also be contagious; and for employers, it’s important for them to seek that kind of energy since it only takes a few negative people to bring down a department or even the organization as a whole.

2. A Strong Work Ethic

Hiring people that possess a strong work ethic is key to the success of any employer. First off, a strong work ethic cannot be taught. When individuals begin working in a new organization they either have it or they don’t. There are many contributing factors that go into making a strong work ethic like how a person grows up to the value they place on doing an excellent job. These innate attributes are totally out of the control of an employer no matter what type of training they provide or the type of supervision an employee gets.

3. Excellent Communication and Interpersonal Skills

    The ability to be a good communicator cannot be overrated. To succeed in the workforce, employees need to know how to communicate as well as listen in order to work effectively with supervisors, co-workers and clients.

4. Problem-Solving Skills

    Since problems are inevitable, employees who are able to find solutions to daily challenges that arise are most valuable to an organization. Employees who are unable to find a solution to a specific problem but are willing to seek out the advice of others, also makes for a competent and trusted employee.

5. Time Management Skills

    As a results-oriented employee, good time management skills are key to getting assignments accomplished and finishing them on time.

6. Flexibility

    The way company’s do business in today’s competitive marketplace, is changing all the time. It is the ability to remain adaptable that helps an organization move forward and stay with the current times.

7. Work Well in a Team Environment

    In the past employees would oftentimes seek jobs that aligned with their desire to either work independently or work in a team environment. In today’s workforce, much of the work is often done on teams; but there is also a need for employees to work independently in order to get the daily work accomplished.

8. Computer/Technological Skills

    Almost all jobs today require basic computer skills and technological knowledge. Whether it be for record-keeping, spreadsheets, detailed notes, or presentations, employers will want to know a candidate’s level of computer and technological knowledge to establish if they can do the basics of any job.

9. Project Management Skills

    Individuals going about the daily routine of their job will need to know how to prioritize and plan each activity to be able to get the best job done in the least amount of time.

10. Self-Confidence

    Self-confident employees are able to detach themselves personally from any challenges that they experience on the job. Self-confidence gives employees a sense of strength as they pursue their personal goals as well as those of an organization.

11. Ability to Accept Constructive Criticism

    There is always room for everyone to grow and learn and the employee that is able to take constructive criticism and use it to improve their performance will be seen as a valuable team member to any organization.

12. Strong Research Skills

     With strong computer and technological skills being one of the top 12 soft skills employers seek, employees who are able to do the basic research and have the ability to gather important information for projects, and identify how and what competitors are doing to make themselves successful, is a sought-after skill that many organizations want.

souce : link to Source

How College Students Can Prepare to be Job Ready

How College Students Can Prepare to be Job Ready

How College Students Can Prepare to be Job Ready
How College Students Can Prepare to be Job Ready

Before graduation, students need to know that a college degree might get you in the door for an interview and increase your earning potential, but it’s only part of the employment equation. To land the job, employers aren’t only looking at what you know; they want to know what you can do. So the following are the top 6 tips for college students to be job ready.

1. Treat college as your job      

     Use class time to work on making a good impression on the professor by dressing professionally, using positive body language, and taking the time to introduce yourself to professors and classmates. Also, for a variety of reasons, make it a priority to go to class on time, turn in assignments, and get involved in class discussions.

2. Meet your professors   

    In the world of work, you’ll learn more from your mentors than from your managers. Overcome any fears of intimidation with higher-ups through practice building relationships with your professors. When you get to the workforce, you’ll be primed to talk to mentors in your field who can help you advance in your career.

3. Practice active listening skills during lectures

    Lectures offer a perfect opportunity to hone active listening skills. Work to fully understand the material presented and to ask relevant questions. Practicing these skills will help increase job-readiness while also helping to understand the course material better.

4. Use group projects to practice leadership and teamwork skills   

    Group projects are an excellent opportunity to practice skills such as critical thinking, decision-making, and problem solving. Group work is a great opportunity to practice both working as a team and taking the lead.

5. Improve self-management skills      

    Students have a lot to balance, and college is a great opportunity to put self-management skills to use. Some people may self-manage by using tools like planners, study groups, or flashcards. Others may simply need to turn off their cell phone and computer when studying in order to focus. When it comes to finding out the best way you learn, study, and work, practice makes perfect.

6. Learn to love challenge     

    Employers value a person who is willing to tackle challenges head-on over the person who gets stuck in the weeds. It is far more important for students to challenge themselves than to maintain a perfect GPA. In the long run, the classes that are easy A’s simply aren’t worth it. Learning through a challenging course builds confidence you will use well into your career.

 

Employers are looking for new hires who possess the know-how and the soft skills to get the job done, and then some. This year, don’t just dress for the job you want, be the professional you want to be. Now is the time to start creating your professional presence. Make a bold statement with your actions and your words.

 

source : Link To Source

Secrets for Achieving and Maintaining Work-Life Balance

Top 5 Secrets to Achieving and Maintaining Work-Life Balance

Top 5 Secrets to Achieving and Maintaining Work-Life Balance
Top 5 Secrets to Achieving and Maintaining Work-Life Balance

    In a world where more and more people find themselves working in roles that could be considered “always on” jobs, how do people achieve and maintain work-life balance and how do companies and leaders promote this way of life? It is a challenge to say the least.

    To help entrepreneurs, managers, and employees strike the right balance, here are five ways to achieve and maintain life-work balance. There is no one size fits all approach, but hopefully, these tips will lead to productive discussions for managers and employees.

 

1.  Be open about your needs

     I believe that the first thing people need to do is identify what truly matters to them and communicate it. Don’t hide it and don’t expect others to guess what makes you feel balanced and fulfilled.

    Do you need to leave work at 6 p.m. so you can have dinner with your family? Do you need to step away at 12 p.m. to attend a  class? Whatever your sweet spot is you need to find it and be transparent about it. Employees need to have an open dialogue with their managers and managers need to understand what works and what is possible. Different jobs require different approaches, but everyone can benefit from having an open and honest conversation about what balance means.

2.  Respect boundaries

    You cannot achieve your balance if you don’t respect the boundaries you have put in place. It will be hard in the beginning but you need to stick with it so you develop a routine and drive a culture and lifestyle of predictability. You will find that there is also something else you can do. There is always another email to reply to or a problem to work, but you need to PERSONALLY respect your boundaries. If you don’t then you can’t expect others to respect them.

3.  Understand what really matters

     Over the years I have seen too many people spend too much time working on things that don’t really matter. Time is the most valuable commodity in life: it is the one thing you cannot buy more of. So, don’t waste time. Focus on what really matters. What really moves the needle for the business? Are you working on priorities that drive the overall goals of the business or are you just making noise? Really scrutinize your day and max it out every hour, minute and second to focus on the most important outputs. For some this may require a high degree of planning and structure.

4.  Embrace the off button

    Pretty much every piece of technology has an off button, so use it. It is not easy and for many people this is the hardest thing to do. To get started, do it in phases. Don’t bring your cellphone to the dinner table. When you are on vacation, be on vacation. Don’t bring your tablet to the beach. Once you have done it a few times, it is easier to push the boundaries. When you unplug and step back you will start to experience one of life’s greatest treasures — perspective. You will think about problems you are wrestling with greater clarity. You allow yourself the freedom to be more analytical and less emotional when you step away and think vs. just diving in and responding in the moment.

5.  Pace yourself

    To have a long, healthy, productive, and happy life and career you need to understand the value of pace. There are times when you need to throttle up and there are times when you can throttle down. Self-awareness is crucial. Doing so will help you enjoy the journey as much as the destination.

 

source : Link to Source

Factors That Demonstrate a Strong Work Ethic

5 Factors That Demonstrate a Strong Work Ethic

 

Work Ethics
Work Ethics

    A strong work ethic is vital to a company achieving its goals. Every employee, from the CEO to entry-level workers, must have a good work ethic to keep the company functioning at its peak. A work ethic is a set of moral principals an employee uses in his job. Certain factors come together to create a strong work ethic.

Integrity

Integrity stretches to all aspects of an employee’s job. An employee with integrity fosters trusting relationships with clients, coworkers and supervisors. Coworkers value the employee’s ability to give honest feedback. Clients trust the employee’s advice. Supervisors rely on the employee’s high moral standards, trusting him not to steal from the company or create problems.

Sense of Responsibility

A strong sense of responsibility affects how an employee works and the amount of work she does. When the employee feels personally responsible for her job performance, she shows up on time, puts in her best effort and completes projects to the best of her ability.

Emphasis on Quality

Some employees do only the bare minimum, just enough to keep their job intact. Employees with a strong work ethic care about the quality of their work. They do their best to produce great work, not merely churn out what is needed. The employee’s commitment to quality improves the company’s overall quality.

Discipline

It takes a certain level of commitment to finish your tasks every day. An employee with good discipline stays focused on his goals and is determined to complete his assignments. These employees show a high level of dedication to the company, always ensuring they do their part.

Sense of Teamwork

Most employees have to work together to meet a company’s objectives. An employee with a high sense of teamwork helps a team meet its goals and deliver quality work. These employees respect their peers and help where they can, making collaborations go smoother.

 

source : Link To Source

Things You Should Do While You are Looking For Work

10 Things You Should Do While You’re Looking For Work

Job hunting is exhausting. Here are 10 things every job seeker should do to maximize chances for success.
10 Things You Should Do While You Are Looking For Work
10 Things You Should Do While You Are Looking For Work

Looking for work can be stressful and tiring, especially if you don’t have a plan. Handing out resumes and making cold calls can be hard on your self-confidence, but being strategic about your job hunt can re-invigorate you and give you the motivation to keep going. Here are 10 things you should try to do while you’re looking for work.

1. If possible, do some investigating while you’re still employed

    Waiting until you’re unemployed obviously adds an additional layer of stress to the job hunt. If at all possible, do some research and make some inquiries while you’re still employed.

2. Build your personal brand

    When looking for work, time can be your friend. Instead of sitting on your hands waiting for the perfect job to surface, use that time to work on building your personal brand. This might include polishing up your image on social media, getting involved in online and offline professional groups and reaching out to other professionals in your field. While building your personal brand requires time and commitment, it’s a strategy that can help you now as well as in the future.

3. Build your portfolio by taking on unpaid work

    If the job hunt has moved beyond weeks and into months and you’re able to swing it financially, taking on some volunteer work can help enhance your resume. Taking on short-term unpaid (or low-paying) gigs can give you additional experience in your chosen specialty, and can increase your chances of being the perfect candidate for your dream job.

    When speaking with colleagues or potential employers about your job search, be sure to mention that you’d like to keep things confidential–the last thing you want is for word to get back to your employer before you’ve found your next job. For more tips, see Jacquelyn Smiths’ great article, The Do’s and Don’ts of Job Searching While You’re Still Employed.

4. Perfect your resume

    Customize your resume for each job you apply for. Take some time to perfect your resume, CV or portfolio to adequately showcase your skills, education and experience. Write unique cover letters for each position, explaining why you want the job and how you feel you can add value to the company.

5. Treat the job hunt as a full time job

    Taking a week or two off after losing your job is fine, but thinking of the job hunt as an extended vacation will also extend your unemployment. Treat the search as you would a 9-5 job, and have a plan in place for how you’re going to spend that time.

6. Take an online course to enhance your skills

     Whether you’re looking for a job in a new field or just wanting to upgrade your current skill set, taking an online course can help your resume get noticed. Not only does it give you new skills, it shows that you’re motivated and willing to do what it takes to better yourself and get the right job.

7. Take breaks

    While it’s important to keep yourself busy and motivated while unemployed, it’s also important to build in times of rest and relaxation. Looking for a job can be one of life’s most stressful events, so building in some time for self-care–like exercising and spending time with friends–can keep you sane during the process.

8. Get off your computer

    In the past, looking for work often meant handing out dozens of resumes and then waiting for a call. These days, much of the job hunt is done on the computer via job boards, social media and email. Resist the temptation to spend all your time online, and get out there and network. Call up old colleagues for coffee, attend networking groups and go to industry conferences. You never know what these meetings could lead to, and getting out helps keep you connected to the real world.

9. Let your network know you’re looking

    According to this article in The Wall Street Journal, up to 80% of jobs are filled without employer advertising. While this number seems rather high, we do know that many jobs never make it onto an official job posting. Employers are looking for people they know and trust, and are increasingly relying on personal recommendations from colleagues and employees. As a job hunter, the advantage to you is that the competition may be less fierce. However it also means you need to be putting yourself out there so your network knows exactly what type of work you’re looking for.

10. Get on LinkedIn

    Employers are increasingly using internet searches to vet potential employees (some put this number as high as 80%). Unless you have your own website, your LinkedIn profile is likely going to be at the top of the search results for your name. Spend some time making sure your profile is complete, and accurately showcases your skills and experience. Ask your connections to endorse you and to give you personal and professional recommendations.

    Having a plan in place during your job search can not only keep you motivated, but can increase your chances of finding the perfect job. The strategies above can not only get you hired faster, they’ll put you in good stead even after you’re hired–more connections, improved skills and a strong personal brand are what will set you apart as a valued member of the company.

 

source : link to source

Look Confident In An Interview

5 Ways to Look Confident in an Interview

Ways To Look Confident In An Interview
Ways To Look Confident In An Interview

    After the long, exhausting journey of searching for and applying to new jobs, you’ve just been rewarded with a golden ticket—an interview.But after a brief moment of celebration, the panic sets in: Your heart is already pounding, your palms are beginning to sweat, and you’re wondering: Are hiring managers like sharks—can they smell fear?If the thought of sitting across from a hiring manager makes your stomach turn, you’re not alone. But don’t let your nerves get the best of you! Try one these strategies that will help you feel calm, cool, and collected—or at least make you appear that way.

 

1. Just Breathe

    While waiting to be greeted by your interviewer, take a few moments to do some breathing. (Yes, like a pregnant woman in labor!) By doing this, you can redirect the troublesome emotion you’re experiencing (e.g., nervousness or fear) and be able to focus on something else (in this case, the amazing job that you’re hoping to land). Holistic health expert Andrew Weil, MD praises breathing exercises, saying, “Since breathing is something we can control and regulate, it is a useful tool for achieving a relaxed and clear state of mind.”

    To do this most effectively, take a deep breath through your nose (really feel your stomach expand) and then slowly blow it out through your mouth. Repeat this three times, while concentrating on centering your thoughts. The best thing about this technique is that you can do it anywhere (and quite unnoticeably), so if you feel your nerves start to swell during the interview, simply take another breath.

2. Don’t Fidget

    Nervous fidgeting is one of the most telltale signs that you’re nervous, so this is an incredibly important skill to master. My go-to trick is to keep my hands clasped together on the table or in my lap to avoid any subconscious table tapping, hair twirling, or otherwise noticeable squirming. I’m also a leg-shaker—but keeping my hands in my lap and applying a bit of pressure to my legs helps remind me to keep the shaking to a minimum.

    If you think you don’t have any fidgety habits, you might want to think again—most people aren’t aware of their own nervous tendencies because they’re such an ingrained part of their natural behavior. To double check, try doing a few mock interviews with a friend who can call you out on any fidgeting. Once you know exactly what to avoid, you can practice controlling it.

 

3. Make Eye Contact

    One of the best ways to fool a hiring manager into thinking you’re more confident than you feel is to keep steady, natural eye contact throughout the interview. Mary Griffin, a Human Resources Director for a national healthcare company says, “A key giveaway of a nervous Nellie is a lack of direct eye contact—looking down, looking away, and not looking the interviewer directly in the eyes. A more confident interviewee appears to be engaged with the interviewer.”

    One way to remind yourself to make regular eye contact is to focus on a spot between the interviewer’s eyes. You can even imagine a colorful bulls-eye there—whatever it takes to keep your eyes from wandering too much.

    On the flip side, you don’t want to stay so intensely focused on making eye contact that you end up sending out a creepy vibe! So remember to take natural breaks, like looking down at your resume every once in a while. It’s a balancing act, so just keep practicing until it feels comfortable.

 

4. Press Pause

    Some of us (myself included!) tend to ramble when we’re nervous. This can be dangerous because once we start talking, it’s incredibly easy to veer off topic and say more than what’s needed—or worse, more than what’s appropriate.

    To preempt any rambling, I try to answer each question with only one thought or idea at a time. For example, if you’re asked to describe a trait you disliked about a previous supervisor, you could say, “I found that her tendency to micromanage conflicted with my productivity.” Then stop. This will save you from unnecessary add-ons like “She was a total control freak whose inability to let me make my own decisions made me want to run down the hall screaming obscenities”—even if that may be the most honest answer.

    The key to mastering this technique is to keep your tone sincere, so that even if your responses are brief, they don’t come off as curt or dismissive. It’s more about sticking to one main topic per question instead of going off a nervous tangent. And don’t worry—if the interviewer wants you to elaborate on a certain topic, she’ll ask.

 

5. Think Positively

    Finally, calm your nerves by reminding yourself that you deserve to be there. Hey, you wouldn’t have been invited to interview if you weren’t being seriously considered as a candidate! Use this knowledge to your advantage to mentally pump yourself up before the interview. It can take the edge off enough to allow you to approach the situation with a burst of self-assurance and poise.

    Most importantly, remember that while you certainly need to be calm, collected, and confident in order to score the job, an interview is not a life-or-death situation. Hiring managers are humans, too—and they’ll understand and forgive a few minor nervous blips.

 

So with that in mind, relax, gather your strength, and walk into that interview with a newfound confidence (at least on the outside!).

Before Leaving don’t forget to check

8 Useful Tips To Prepare For Job Interview

Make Your Resume Unique with 7 Simple Steps

source : Link to Source

What are your Salary Expectations ?

How to answer: What are your Salary Expectations ?

A common question at a job interview or on a job application form is ‘What are your Salary expectations?’ But it’s a tricky one to answer. It can be awkward, the majority of job seekers don’t want to discuss money. If you say a figure too high you may miss out on a job offer.  If it’s too low, you may miss out financially.

 

What are your salary expectations?
What are your salary expectations?

Option 1 : Research

– Make sure you’re realistic and honest about your salary expectations. The best practice is to do some research to give you a rough figure. You can do this by looking at job vacancies for similar roles and see what their salary rate is. Another way is to check out some of the salary guides which you can find easily online.

Salary calculators are available that can give some general information that may help to understand the market for your particular position such as:

1. http://www.payscale.com

2. http://www.glassdoor.com

But be aware that most calculators and salary guides do not take into account benefits or incentives. Therefore it is important to also weigh up the the ‘perks’ of the job. Consider, do they give you a free gym membership? Or pay for a company car? Do they reimburse you for your commute? Are there any bonus schemes or incentives you can tap into?

Take your time, do you research and get a ‘ball park figure’.

Option 1: How to Answer

Once you have gathered your information and you feel confident with the figure you have in mind, you can phrase your answer like so:

What are you expecting to make in terms of salary?

A: I understand that positions similar to this one pay in the range of £X to £Z in our area. With my experience, I would like to receive something in the range of £Y to £Z as a starting salary.

Other points you may want to include could be your number of years experience, your qualifications or any qualities you have that gives you an edge over your competitors.

 

Option 2: Let your interviewer do the work

Asking for your salary level is a fair question and a standard part of information gathering. Conversely, asking what the range is that’s being offered is also fair. This can be quite a good tactic, as it forces you interviewer to give a salary range which you can then negotiate to suit you.

Option 2: How to Answer

What are you expecting to make in terms of salary?
A:“My main concern is finding a job that is a good fit for me. I’m sure whatever salary you’re paying is consistent with the rest of the market, what is the range being offered?”

A: “I’d appreciate it if you could make me an offer based on whatever you have budgeted for this position and we can go from there.” – (Note: The ‘appreciate’ make this statement sound less demanding)

A: “I’m flexible and especially interested in your company and this position. What is the range being offered?”

These answers are just guides, it’s important to put it into your own words and add any extra details that are specific to you.

If you have any advice for answering this question feel free to post in the comments below.

Dont’ Forget to check  Top 8 Useful Tips for Job Interviews

Source: Link to Source