10 Tech Tools to Help You Get Excellent Hiring Results

The hiring process is getting simpler… and more complicated by the day. How is that possible? One word: technology. As a recruiter, you have the option to make your job easier by using all the right tools. They help you pick the right candidates and eliminate the expense of a bad hire.

However, technology also complicates things for you. With so many tools to choose from, how do you pick the right ones? If you use the wrong tools, they won’t help you make good hiring decisions.

Does this mean it is okay to skip technology because of the risks it comes with? No. With the right tech tools, the entire talent acquisition and retention process become more effective. You just need to find those right tech tools, and you’ll be on the right track with excellent hiring results.

  1. Recruiting Chrome Extensions

If you could only have a tool to find the emails, phone numbers, and social profiles of the people you’re interested in… oh wait; there is such a tool.

It’s a Google Chrome extension called Prophet. Whenever you see an attractive LinkedIn profile, you can use Prophet to search for more information about that person. It will show you their Facebook and Google+ profiles, emails, phones, blogs, sites, and all kinds of details they’ve shared under their name.

  1. Productivity Tech Tools

Strict Workflow, a Google Chrome extension, helps you organize the workflow in productivity-boosting sections. You’ll be working in 25-minute sessions; after which you’ll take a 5-minute break. That’s enough to get the refreshment your brain needs and get back to work.

Google Calendar is another productivity tool that a recruiter definitely needs. Plus, you can explore to-do apps, such as Remember the Milk and Wunderlist. When you have your daily goals outlined, you’ll be more inspired to achieve them.

  1. Distraction-Blocking Browser Extensions

You’re browsing Facebook for new candidates, and you suddenly find yourself looking at cat videos on YouTube for half an hour. With distraction-blocking extensions, you can prevent that from happening. StayFocusd is such a tool. It will limit the period of time you’re allowed to spend on distracting online destinations.

  1. Graphic Creation Tools

How do you create a great job ad? How do you develop a successful employer brand that would attract talent? Content is the answer. But it has to be visually intriguing.

You don’t have to hire a graphic designer. Canva and Piktochart are great tools that help you create infographics, banners, and posters in a matter of minutes.

  1. Content Sharing Tools

Where will you share all that content you create for the sake of employer branding and attracting new candidates? Social media, of course. But, managing several social profiles will take way too much time. You’ll make things simpler if you use Buffer, or Hootsuite – tools that automate the content sharing process.

  1. Applicant Tracking System

It will process all submitted resumes, leaving you with the most relevant ones to review. You just look for the right keywords and you’ll get a narrower selection of candidates.

The top choices for applicant tracking systems are Jobvite, Newton, and JazzHR.

  1. Interview Scheduling Tools

It’s not easy for a recruiter to schedule a meeting at a time that works both for them and the candidate. With Assistant.to and YouCanBook.me, online scheduling tools, you’ll eliminate the inconveniences. You’ll just share your schedule and allow people to schedule at an available time that works for them.

  1. RecruitmentProcess Management Tools

Every recruiter needs a system that helps them keep track of all candidates. There, you’ll make notes of the first impressions. Entelo is such a tool. It allows you to create entire profiles of the candidates. These profiles will indicate their presence on the web, your notes, and all information you collect.

  1. Email Management Tools

You know you had a great candidate a couple of months ago, but you forgot their name and now it’s impossible to find that message in the mess that your inbox is?

You absolutely need an email management tool. MixMax and Streak are good options. They allow you to schedule emails and see when people open your messages.

  1. Twitter Management Tools

To get the fullrecruiting potential out of Twitter, you need a management tool that lets you connect with the right target audience. TweetDeck is such a tool. You can use it to schedule posts and content to share and search for popular tweets and influencers by conversations, topics, and interests.

Yes, there’s a lot of technology to use. All these options may be overwhelming. But, think of it this way: thanks to technology, your job as a recruiter will never get boring. You always have new tools to explore!

Source: http://bit.ly/2l0AxL9

Improve skills of Recruiting Cold Calls

Choosing the Perfect employees is the key to a successfulcompany. One of those manners of locating deserving staff members is by way of cold contacting. Most virtual recruiter avoid cold calling since it will acquire awkward, disagreeable, and it is frustrating as well as the candidates may possibly not likewise be curious.

Despite all that, cold calling is a Remarkable method to hire since it could yield immediate results. Whatever you need to do is find the best resumes from job portals and previous contacts and provide them a telephone as opposed to going right on through hundreds of candidates.

Here are just five hacks which will enhance your Cold call recruiting match:

  1. Socialize with the candidate:

You may be exhausted of calling 20 distinct Potential candidates, but you have to seem stimulating every single time you telephone. If you sound boring and dull, the offender will most likely not bother in exactly what you need to state. They may feel that you’re not interested from the telephone and also certainly will reciprocate in the same method. Start by asking whether it’s a superb time to chat and get to know the candidate by actually revealing fascination.

  1. Sell Your Business:

Before educating the possible candidate around the job profile, describe exactly what your company is doing. Keep it crisp and prolonged enough to have the offender eager. So to allow the prospect realize that your business is a joyful and effective place to just work at, is actually a fantastic place to begin the dialog. Make clear them the work profile in depth and tell the reason why they ought to join the firm. Many recruiters seek the services of high management employees with this particular hack and it works each and every moment; point.

  1. Telephone the candidate back:

Telephone the offender a couple of days following the First telephone. Even in the event it’s the case that the candidate mentioned that they aren’t interested from the first call, provide an opportunity to think about doing it. They may accept come back for a meeting following the second telephone. Whether they ace the meeting or not, then you may still receive a candidate on your own shortlist that you are able to contact to get another job profile

  1. Request a referral:

Proceed on social media and await Men and Women that Might be ideal for your task opening. Your friend list may have individuals who are qualified for this occupation. You may also ask your employees whether there is something they know who can meet in the position. Once you cold call someone using a mutual contact, it gets easier to strike up dialog.

You Might Have to create your own Techniques to Excel in cold calling recruiting. It is going to be difficult initially and very stressful way too, but if you proceed with all your campaigns, it is going to provide excellent results.

You Are Able to also list the forecasts for coaching Purposes and utilize it for the study also. It can allow you to locate the areas by that you simply want to increase.

Source: http://bit.ly/2iG6vaS 

QUALITIES THAT HR IS LOOKING IN NEW HIRES

QUALITIES THAT HR IS LOOKING IN NEW HIRES

Here are the some key qualities That HR look out in the new hires to ensure longevity of the tenure.

  1.  Endurance:

Turnovers can be expensive for HR. Hence the foremost qualities they look for in new hires are endurance, commitment and prospect of longevity of the tenure.

  1.  Team player:

Anybody can work in silos but it takes a lot of perseverance and high levels of patience and gratitude to work as a team player. Incidentally, all these qualities make for a good employee itself.

  1.   Ambitious:

Motivated and self-driven people are an asset to any organization. Ambitious employees work hard and try to surpass their own excellence, which in turn benefits the organization at large. Who doesn’t want to hire such employees?

  1.   Trustworthy:

Trust is a very tricky characteristic to identify in an employee. An employee who is true in his/her work and dependable is sure to have long-term benefits for the organizations and is most likely to stick around for long.

  1.    Positive attitude:

They say, if you have a positive attitude in life you are a sure winner. Organizations look out for such employees because they know such employees can stand up to failure and competition with much confidence.

  1.  Multi-tasking skills:

Businesses often resort to cost cutting by having fewer employees who can multi-task. With growing competition, multi-tasking is one of the desired quality HR looks for in new hires.

Promoting yourself: the rules of success

Promoting yourself: the rules of success - Morpheus Consulting

A diligent and hard-working project manager at a global bank was known for meeting deadlines. A functional expert and a team player, she never hesitated to work beyond the designated hours. Self-evasive and reticent, she strongly believed that her work would speak louder than words to get her the recognition she deserved. Much to her dismay, however, she was passed over for a promotion that year.

Inherent excellence is not always enough to fetch recognition.

In his book Power: Why Some Have It And Some Don’t, Jeffrey Pfeffer, professor of organizational behaviour at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business, says it’s not enough to presume that success is based on the quality of your work and job performance alone. Potential sponsors need to know about your skills, competencies, accomplishments and experiences to be encouraged to make a positive difference to your career. You can share information on this so that you get career-enhancing opportunities “If you blend into the woodwork, no one will care about you, even if you are doing a great job. Being memorable equals getting picked,” says Pfeffer.

How to do it

Self-promotion is a delicate art because if you overdo it, you come across as a braggart, and if you underplay, you don’t get the accolades. “It needs to be subtle, responsible and balanced,” cautions Saket Kanoria, managing director, TCPL Packaging Ltd. “Self-promotion that takes the toxic shape of running down other people’s work, claiming credit which rightfully belongs elsewhere, and taking advantage of proximity to one’s manager, may fetch short-term gains, but will undoubtedly prove counter-productive in the long run,” adds Sunder Ram Korivi, dean, School for Securities Education, National Institute of Securities Markets, Navi Mumbai. There should be a line between gaining a following and becoming sickeningly self-promotional, especially if you don’t wan’t to be penalized for the latter.

Here are a few strategies to generate more visibility:

Prepare your story

A senior stakeholder you meet in the elevator enquires, “What’s up?”, and you respond with, “All well. Thanks!” Instead, you could have seized this opportunity to promote yourself by highlighting an accomplishment or two. For instance, “We successfully closed a record number of 248 transactions this month—25% above average.” Or, “I finished cross-training on process ABC. I am now conversant with a range of processes in the system.” The trick lies in being prepared with your story, and arming yourself with data points that you can reel off at the drop of a hat.

Redefine self-promotion

Since promoting one’s accomplishments goes against the value of modesty ingrained in us, let’s first rethink the definition of self-promotion. “Just as the objective of marketing a product is to generate awareness about its key benefits to help customers make sound decisions, think of self-promotion as a responsible communication of your talents and accomplishment to those who can leverage and benefit from this information, thus making it a win-win proposition,” says Darshana Ogale, chief operating officer, S P Jain School of Global Management.

In his 2014 book Promote Yourself: The New Rules For Career Success, author Dan Schawbel highlights the disconnect between what managers look for when deciding on promotions (a positive attitude and the ability to prioritize) and what employees think managers want (communication skills and leadership ability). So, it is important to showcase a range of abilities instead of coming across as one-dimensional.

Clothe it in anecdotes

Share your success in the form of a story. Instead of saying that you did an awesome job negotiating a successful deal with a tough customer, share your strategy and challenges in cracking the deal, enabling your team to learn from your experience. Engage with humility, focus on facts, and ensure that those stories are relevant, says Dorie Clark, in a Harvard Business Review article, How To Promote Yourself Without Looking Like A Jerk.

“Align your story with the context and the audience. Share it with a genuine belief that it is relevant to the audience, rather than with a mindset of promoting yourself. Authenticity matters,” says Atul Srivastava, chief executive officer, Effective People, a Mumbai-based human resources consulting and training company.

impactful introduction

When called upon to introduce yourself at an external conference, an internal training programme or to a visiting global practice head, go beyond the vanilla introduction encompassing your role, designation and experience. Make your introduction audience-centric and impactful by incorporating elements that differentiate and lend a recall value. For instance, something like, “I am an avid trekker, I did the Everest base camp trek last year,” is likely to stick in the minds of the audience. “A compelling introduction at an event, almost always an outcome of serious introspection and practice, certainly helps you make an impact. In fact, sometimes just asking a question at a conference or a seminar gets you noticed, and works towards your promotion,” says Srivastava.

Engage beyond your core work

As the organization expands, it is not easy to get noticed outside your immediate circle. “Participating in forums outside my core work, like knowledge-sharing forums, organizational committees, corporate social responsibility initiatives, diversity, etc. has gone a long way in helping me garner visibility and connect with people beyond my operational network,” says Ogale.

Communicate with your manager

“Proactively meeting your manager not only to seek feedback, but also to apprise him of your accomplishments, challenges and aspirations is important. While a manager is likely to be aware of your big-ticket items, your differentiator may lie in some of your smaller achievements,” says Korivi. So tracking your accomplishments and feeding your manager with regular updates would be mutually beneficial—it would not only help you promote yourself, but also offer your manager data points to identify areas where you could contribute. Managing others’ perceptions about your accomplishments separates workplace winners from those who don’t move up the ladder, says Pfeffer.

Engage on social media

Soumitra Dutta, professor at the Institut Européen d’Administration des Affaires (Insead), a graduate business school, and writer of the Harvard Business Review article Managing Yourself: What’s Your Personal Social Media Strategy?, strongly advocates embracing the social media as a platform for promoting yourself, building your personal brand and engaging with stakeholders by communicating who you are. “Active participation on social media is a powerful tool—the difference between leading effectively and ineffectively, and between advancing and faltering in the pursuit of your goals,” says Prof. Dutta.

Start with posting an impactful profile, portraying your expertise by engaging in discussion forums, posting articles and commenting on posts, thus creating visibility for yourself. “I have found that leveraging the organization’s intranet is a great way of getting your story before your audience,” says Ogale.

Reverse promotion

When you promote others, guided by the principle of reciprocity, they promote you in return. This reverse promotion, besides enhancing your visibility and highlighting your achievements, also helps you build relationships and earn goodwill. So, be open to connecting with people, learning about, and promoting, their talents and achievements.

Source: http://bit.ly/2ArpFJH

6 Impressive Skills to Include on Your Resume

In a job market where recruiters review an average of up to 250 applications per job listing, you need to submit a resume that stands out. But where do you even start?

Since you already know which skills to leave off your resume, and you’ve studied which trends to try and which to ignore, it’s time to talk about what should be on your resume. Here are three experts’ takes on the seven skills that will have recruiters excited to see your resume come into their queue.

Hard Skills

Whether you’re a high-tech data scientist or a high-performing elementary school teacher, here’s a selection of hard skills that can make you stand out from the competition.

1. Data Collection and Analysis

Increased technology usage in the workplace means there’s more data than ever to collect, track and analyze. That’s why data analysis is such a huge growth area, says Matt Sigelman, the CEO of Burning Glass Technologies, in Time: “Mainstream American companies have come to realize that in order to become more effective in the marketplace, they need to analyze data,” explains Sigelman. “And we’re seeing those skills showing up at a premium in a variety of industries, including marketing, logistics jobs and operations management jobs.”

How to Highlight: Reflect on the opportunities you’ve had to capture and analyze data in your current job and include them on your resume. If you can’t think of any, consider taking a free online course in data analytics from a website like edX or Coursera, then apply what you learn on the job.

2. Social Media

Social media makes a timely addition to any resume, says career coach Bethany Wallace: “Regardless of career field and job role, possessing social media management skills is a plus for any candidate,” she remarks. “Many companies still resist hiring a social media manager, and the ability to fill that gap might make the difference in a candidate’s standing.”

How to Highlight: If you completed coursework or an internship that involved social media, include it on your resume — extra points for sharing specifics on a campaign you executed. Don’t list recreational social media on your resume — limit this to times that you’ve managed social media accounts in a professional capacity.

3. Content Management Systems

Website building and design aren’t just for coders anymore. Easy-to-learn platforms like WordPress, Blogger, Squarespace and more can help you learn the basics of creating and maintaining a blog or website. “WordPress is the most popular CMS (content management system) in the world. Tons of sites, big and small, use it to power their businesses,” says Laurence Bradford, creator of Learn to Code With Me, on Forbes. “WordPress is helpful to know in a range of careers from web development to writing.”

How to Highlight: Learn how to use these platforms through one of the many available online classes or tutorials, then list it under the skill section of your resume. If you want to go the extra mile, build a personal website or online portfolio and include a link to it so recruiters and hiring managers can see your skills for themselves.

Soft Skills

Even in a technical age, it’s not all about technical skills. In fact, in a report compiled by the International Association of Administrative Professionals, OfficeTeam and HR.com, 67 percent of HR managers said they’d hire a candidate with strong soft skills even if that person’s technical skills were lacking.

While you can’t rely on being hired for a job based on soft skills alone, such a strong majority opinion among hiring managers is more than enough incentive to bring a focus to soft skills on your resume and in your interview process. Just don’t list them out point-blank — that’s an amateur (and unconvincing) way to do it. Instead, let your resume bullet points demonstrate how you’ve leveraged these skills.

1. Communication

Communication consistently ranks among the most important skills for a candidate to have — and that includes both verbal and written. “According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, 73.4% of employers want a candidate with strong written communication skills,” says Kaleigh Moore, contributing writer for Inc.

How to Highlight: Edit your resume for grammar and spelling, but also for clarity. Rewrite long sentences to be shorter, then read your resume out loud to make sure all of your thoughts make sense. Prove your communication skills by email and phone by being brief and to-the-point — yet warm — whenever you interact with the recruiter.

2. Problem-Solving

“Employees themselves are hopefully ‘solved problems,’ fulfilling their job duties and more,” writes Jessica Amidon on the AthLife blog, a career development resource for post-professional, professional and collegiate athletes. “An employee that is able to present creative solutions to complex problems creates tremendous value for the employer and makes himself indispensable.”

How to Highlight: Most resume bullet points should focus on the solution to a problem, such as “Increased email open rates 10 percent.” Whenever possible, articulate the problem as well as the solution so that recruiters can see exactly how you’ve applied your problem-solving skills.

3. Positive Attitude

It’s not hard to understand why employers value this skill so highly — it can help in nearly every situation you encounter in the workplace, from collaborating with others to identifying creative solutions. “Having a positive attitude is absolutely crucial if candidates want to stand out from their peers,” Wallace agrees.

How to Highlight: It’s easier to display a positive attitude in an interview than on a resume, but you can start by framing your on-the-job challenges in a positive way. Using verbs like “overcame,” “surmounted,” “succeeded” and “won” can contribute to an overall positive, energetic impression.

Whether you’re one of the millions of people looking for a job, or currently employed but considering your next move, list as many of these skills as you can to make your resume pop up in front of the recruiters.

Source: http://bit.ly/2zPiUjS

Preparing For A Phone Interview? Four Tips To Keep Top Of Mind

You made it past the initial resume screening and are scheduled for a phone interview. It’s easy to overlook this step in the process, but remember, if you don’t do well here, the chances of getting to the next step in the hiring process are next to nil. The person conducting the interview is either going to put their stamp of approval on you as a candidate or send you a rejection letter. Ace this step and you may even gain an ally in the hiring process.

Here are a few dos (and don’ts) to make sure you get the face-to-face interview.

1. Make sure you set aside time so there’s no conflict.

Set up a quiet place where you can have a candid conversation without risk of intrusion. As an interviewer, I always ask a candidate prior to starting if it’s still a good time for them. Recently, I have gotten responses like:

• “Hang on, let me go outside. I’m at a restaurant.”

• “Sure, I’m in the car driving so I may cut out, but go ahead.”

• “I may have to put you on hold if someone like my boss comes into the office.”

• “If you don’t mind the (kids, pets, etc.) making noise…”

The truth is, if you can’t set aside the time to talk about a career move to my company, I will assume you are not taking the job seriously or respecting my time. Why would I want you to join our team? If there is a conflict, let your interviewer know ahead of time so you can reschedule.

2. Do a little research.

You are almost guaranteed to be asked the question, “What do you know about our company and/or this role?” If you are not prepared to answer this, your interviewer is going to lose interest in you quickly.

While it’s the interviewer’s job to learn enough about your background and skill set, your job should be to learn enough about the company and the role to see if you want to move to the next step. They’ve read your resume, done some background research on you and have a set of questions tailored to what they have already learned. You should be equally prepared.

Spend some time Googling the company, and read their website to learn the core business and know their competitors. Take a look at LinkedIn and get a better understanding of their general organization. Once you have done this, make a list of key questions you want answers to. Have those ready during the phone interview so you’re not improvising.

3. Remember to be professional.

One of the things I like to do is get people to let their guard down. But over the phone, it is easy to fall into the trap of becoming too casual. You would be surprised at what folks say over the phone once they get too comfortable.

I cannot tell you how many times a candidate has dropped a swear word or used an inappropriate phrase. This only makes your interviewer wonder whether you will do this with clients, co-workers or other leaders who would interview you if they were to move you ahead.

Talk to the interviewer as if you were in their office. Envision yourself at the conference table with them. A neat trick is to pull up their profile on LinkedIn so you have their photo in front of you while you interview. It will help you stay focused. In this case, a picture is worth more than 1,000 words!

4. Be prepared to close.

When the interview is over, be sure to ask about next steps. Leaving the phone interview with an ambiguous ending is a sure recipe for not moving ahead. Not indicating that you want a next step is also telling.

Even if you need to dictate what the next step is, be sure it’s mutually agreed upon. For example, “This was a great conversation, but I would like to talk it over with my spouse. I will get back to you by Tuesday.” Similarly, you should expect to hear, “We’ll be interviewing several candidates and will get back to you by Tuesday to let you know if we are moving you ahead.”

Think of your phone interview as a low-stress, initial opportunity for you and the company to get to know each other. Don’t torpedo your chances of getting hired because you exemplified your weaknesses over your strengths.

10 Easy Skills to Pick Up Before Applying to a Job

So you’re writing your new resume, and suddenly you get to the “skills” section. You pause. Wait! What skills do I actually have?  

If you can answer that question with a slew of marketable skills, congratulations! If you have to take a bit of time to answer it, you’re not alone. Developing a slew of marketable skills takes time, and in addition, the skills you choose to highlight may be different based on the jobs you’re applying for. 

Here are a few easily learn able skills that you can use to bulk up your resume(and a few skills mixed in there that won’t necessarily help your resume, but are good to have in general for your job and for life).  Start practicing! 

Public speaking

Effective communication in front of others isn’t just useful for an interview – you’ll also use it every day you’re on the job. You can find tutorials online, everywhere from the Stanford Graduate School of Business to public speaking experts on how to communicate your ideas to an audience – not to mention the guidance and inspiration that TED talks can provide. 

HTML coding

So, this is one of the more time intensive skills to “pick up” on this list. But if you’re new to coding, don’t write it off – learning how to write (or even just recognize!) few basic, useful commands in HTML is a whole different ballpark than trying to teach yourself C++. Websites like Codeacademy offer to teach the basics of HTML in just a few hours of lessons. It’s well worth two afternoons of your time. 

Negotiation

Negotiation is a delicate art that requires a confluence of other soft skills, such as communication, listening, and innovation. You’ll use negotiation during the job application process, when you angle for a better salary or stock options offer. Negotiation will also come in handy when you’re pushing for a raise. Make sure to practice these five soft skills in order to perfect your negotiation prowess. 

PowerPoint

The natural corollary to public speaking skills? PowerPoint. (Or Google Slides, or Prezi, or whatever else you choose to make your presentations). Knowing how to create and present good PowerPoints is a must-have skill for more jobs than you would think. There is a multitude of tutorials and examples online that you can use as a jumping off point. And again, TED talks often have some of the best examples. 

Confidence

Confidence isn’t just something that some people were born with, and others weren’t. It is a skill that can be practiced, refined, and embodied into your daily lifestyle. Amy Gallo writes in the Harvard Business Review to remember to “be honest with yourself about what you know and what you need to learn,” as well as “practice doing the things you are unsure about” and “embrace new opportunities to prove you can do difficult things,” all as simple methods to boost confidence. 

Microsoft Excel

Excel is a powerful tool, and you could spend years learning all of the ins and outs of what you can do with it. Luckily, you usually don’t need to know all the nitty-gritty details of Excel to be able to use it effectively. There are variety of free and paid options to make you into a confident Excel user within just a few hours, or a few days, depending on how much time you can put into it. 

Task management

The ability to manage your time and prioritize your tasks is one of the most widely cited skills of highly productive people. There are so easy methods you can learn to help from this, from waking up a bit earlier to starting the day with your most difficult tasks. If that’s even too much for you, check out the scores of time management apps on the market that can help you use your time more effectively.  

Stress reduction

While stress reduction is not exactly something you can put at the top of the “skills” section of your resume, it’s arguably one of the most important skills you can have on the job— regardless of where you work and what your title is. One method that people are increasingly turning towards to reduce stress in the workplace is meditation. “The busier we are, the more we need that centering time—that time to actually be able to connect to our inner wisdom,” says Arianna Huffington, founder of the Huffington Post and advocate of daily meditation. Apps like Headspace or Insight Timer, or locally offered meditation and stress-reduction classes, can all help you find that “centering time” in your next job. 

Handshaking

Believe it or not, a handshake can speak volumes about a person. Your clammy, dead fish grip might be giving recruiters the wrong impression. Practice turning your limp handshake into a powerful grip, with locked eyes and a smile. Ask your friends, ask your family, ask people on the street to give you feedback on your handshake – this couldn’t be an easier skill to practice. 

Brainstorming

It’s not just at start-ups where ideas are shot rapid-fire around a table and onto a whiteboard (although if you’re applying to a start-up, it’s also a great skill to have).  In pretty much any job you ever have, you’re going to have to think collaboratively with other people. Practice with friends or with family to brainstorm any random topic, and see what you learn from it. 

Source: http://bit.ly/2zaXVe9

5 CRITICAL INTERVIEW TIPS

Professional introduction

Every interviewer asks for an introduction. A candidate should be prepared with the best 4-5 liner summary starting with his present position and job role. You should give a very crisp summary of past roles, but don’t discount your education degrees and achievements in those roles.

Personal interests

All interviewers ask for personal details as well. This question is best answered by a brief about your immediate family and should have mention of your interest. Mention those hobbies where you have won some laurels to create an impression on the interviewer.

Industry knowledge

Every interviewer will want to check your on ground know how and understanding. Make sure you know the latest trend about your industry and company in particular. It helps to talk about them in a manner where you can highlight your achievements as well.

Timeliness

Being punctual will only win you good points. Arriving late and then justifying that with excuses will spoil your reputation even before an interaction.

Politeness

Common sense is becoming uncommon. Hence wishing the interviewer, saying things like – thank you, please, pardon me (when you haven’t understood a query well), if I may add (when stating a personal opinion), have a good day, it was a pleasure meeting you all – will reflect well on you.

5 BODY LANGUAGE DISASTERS JOB SEEKERS MAKE DURING AN INTERVIEW

Not making eye contact

Failing to make eye contact was the body language mistake interviewers were most likely to say they hated. Sixty-seven percent of people surveyed said they didn’t like it when candidates kept their eyes cast down. While you don’t want to get into a creepy staring contest with your interviewer, looking at them while listening and speaking shows you’re engaged in the conversation

Playing with something on the table

Thirty-four percent of hiring managers cited fiddling with pens or shuffling papers as a major example of poor body language in an interview. Clicking a pen or similar gestures can be interpreted as a sign of anxiety.

Crossing your arms

Crossing your arms in front of your chest makes you look defensive and hostile, so it’s no wonder that 32% of HR managers said this was not something they liked to see in people they interviewed.

Not sitting up straight

Slumping in your seat doesn’t convey confidence. Thirty-one percent of HR experts said it made candidates look less than polished in an interview. Sitting up straight and squaring your shoulders not only makes you look confident, but it also shows you respect your interviewer and the situation you’re in.

Using too many hand gestures

The higher the gesture, the more out-of-control you look. The key in an interview is balance: Some hand movement keeps you from coming off as too stiff, but too much and you could look like a loose cannon.

The Two-Minute Resume Review: Where Skills Meet Results

Many of us who have chosen to navigate the constantly variable — and often unpredictable — waters of human resources are familiar with the common components of the resume. Most applications ask for them, many demand them.

With all of the resources available for candidates to search and reference for resume preparation, there is really no excuse for the submission of a sub-standard presentation of their career snapshot. The action verbs that are trending, examples of job descriptions, requirements and templates galore are literally at the fingertips of those who sit in front of a search engine. Knowing that all of these tools are at the disposal of the applicant should imply that the resume quality would be somewhat less variable among the candidate pool. So, should we even spend time on the details of what was once the only passport to the next round of the process? In short, absolutely.

The candidate who leverages the components of the application process to tailor their resume to your posting should migrate toward the top of the pile, simply because they’ll waste less of your time. To help decipher those detail-oriented applicants, here are five ways to cut through the fancy verbiage and get to predictive results, section by section:

1. Objective: “To obtain a position in…” This section can provide insight to the candidate’s maturity in the job market — it should be obvious that they’re seeking a position, so restating that concept is a waste of space that could be used further outlining their qualifications. Assessment: Skip it.

2. Education: It’s always perplexed me when I see this section toward the top, as if the candidate believes that promoting the formal aspects of their training is worth making note of first. The degree displays the candidate’s ability to learn and demonstrate proficiency in a controlled environment. Where they went to school outlines their professional network and perhaps the “culture” of learning they experienced. If the position requires a bachelor’s degree, we shouldn’t see high school graduation information as it just takes up space. And, unless specifically called for within the posting or they’re applying for a scholarship, GPA isn’t as relevant as applicants would like it to be. Assessment: Skim it.

3. Experience: Review for merely a restating of the job description, but hope for a collection of results achieved. Working backward from their most recent position, candidates should describe their experiences in terms of what they actually accomplished, not what they were responsible for. For instance, seeing the bulleted phrase “Responsible for leading a team of 15 employees to success in plastics production,” sounds important. But, were they actually successful? If the candidate has the necessary experience but fails to make their results clear, either place them in limbo until all have been reviewed or advance and target results in the behavioral interview. Assessment: Review for results.

4. References: Candidates should be selecting references specifically pertaining to the job for which they are applying, and if your hiring process requires personal and professional references, they should be included the application. The removal of required references from the resume allows the candidate more space to describe their qualifications as opposed to someone else’s contact information. The astute candidate will avoid this repetition and optimize their space. Assessment: Skip it.

5. Skills and certifications: Given the increasingly standard requirement of the bachelor’s degree, this section will often generate the most relevant substance for candidate evaluation. Unfortunately, applicants will often focus most of their efforts into a robust description of experiences and minimize the skills categorization. A candidate’s ability to demonstrate enough self-awareness to define what tools are in their toolbox will provide the hiring manager with an insight into how they may align with the responsibilities of the position, regardless of their experiences.

The increasingly popular preferences for certifications such as the PHR, PMP, SHRM-CSP, display the higher emphasis on specialization and proven skills acquisition — all accompanied by a third-party validation. This is where candidates can draw on their previous organizational experience to promote the skills obtained as well as the formal and professional experience. For example, if I see a candidate list the “Texas FFA Association” anywhere on their resume, I should expect a skills section including advanced record keeping, public speaking and communication, efficient conduct of meetings, emotionally-intelligent leadership, etc. The intuitive candidate will highlight this degree of proficiency through maximizing the skills they bring to the table as they relate to the position. Assessment: Of crucial importance — read it.

The resume’s relevance can be determined by the organization’s desire to seek insight into the candidate’s attention to detail, coupled with the hiring managers’ understanding of the relationship between skill sets and results. Experience in one position of the same name doesn’t guarantee success in another, as the cultural aspect of an organization may be enough to force a new hire to draw a little deeper into their arsenal of resources. Their resume should describe those resources in enough detail to provide a baseline for the behavioral interview, at which point you will have enough to dig a little deeper into how they’ve applied the skills to achieve results.

Two minutes spent on the resume can lead to hours saved in unfulfilling interviews and disappointing hires. Skills coupled with past results are a definite predictor of future success, and the prepared candidates will make this understanding abundantly clear.

Source: http://bit.ly/2ych2Rn