10 Easy Skills to Pick Up Before Applying to a Job

So you’re writing your new resume, and suddenly you get to the “skills” section. You pause. Wait! What skills do I actually have?  

If you can answer that question with a slew of marketable skills, congratulations! If you have to take a bit of time to answer it, you’re not alone. Developing a slew of marketable skills takes time, and in addition, the skills you choose to highlight may be different based on the jobs you’re applying for. 

Here are a few easily learn able skills that you can use to bulk up your resume(and a few skills mixed in there that won’t necessarily help your resume, but are good to have in general for your job and for life).  Start practicing! 

Public speaking

Effective communication in front of others isn’t just useful for an interview – you’ll also use it every day you’re on the job. You can find tutorials online, everywhere from the Stanford Graduate School of Business to public speaking experts on how to communicate your ideas to an audience – not to mention the guidance and inspiration that TED talks can provide. 

HTML coding

So, this is one of the more time intensive skills to “pick up” on this list. But if you’re new to coding, don’t write it off – learning how to write (or even just recognize!) few basic, useful commands in HTML is a whole different ballpark than trying to teach yourself C++. Websites like Codeacademy offer to teach the basics of HTML in just a few hours of lessons. It’s well worth two afternoons of your time. 

Negotiation

Negotiation is a delicate art that requires a confluence of other soft skills, such as communication, listening, and innovation. You’ll use negotiation during the job application process, when you angle for a better salary or stock options offer. Negotiation will also come in handy when you’re pushing for a raise. Make sure to practice these five soft skills in order to perfect your negotiation prowess. 

PowerPoint

The natural corollary to public speaking skills? PowerPoint. (Or Google Slides, or Prezi, or whatever else you choose to make your presentations). Knowing how to create and present good PowerPoints is a must-have skill for more jobs than you would think. There is a multitude of tutorials and examples online that you can use as a jumping off point. And again, TED talks often have some of the best examples. 

Confidence

Confidence isn’t just something that some people were born with, and others weren’t. It is a skill that can be practiced, refined, and embodied into your daily lifestyle. Amy Gallo writes in the Harvard Business Review to remember to “be honest with yourself about what you know and what you need to learn,” as well as “practice doing the things you are unsure about” and “embrace new opportunities to prove you can do difficult things,” all as simple methods to boost confidence. 

Microsoft Excel

Excel is a powerful tool, and you could spend years learning all of the ins and outs of what you can do with it. Luckily, you usually don’t need to know all the nitty-gritty details of Excel to be able to use it effectively. There are variety of free and paid options to make you into a confident Excel user within just a few hours, or a few days, depending on how much time you can put into it. 

Task management

The ability to manage your time and prioritize your tasks is one of the most widely cited skills of highly productive people. There are so easy methods you can learn to help from this, from waking up a bit earlier to starting the day with your most difficult tasks. If that’s even too much for you, check out the scores of time management apps on the market that can help you use your time more effectively.  

Stress reduction

While stress reduction is not exactly something you can put at the top of the “skills” section of your resume, it’s arguably one of the most important skills you can have on the job— regardless of where you work and what your title is. One method that people are increasingly turning towards to reduce stress in the workplace is meditation. “The busier we are, the more we need that centering time—that time to actually be able to connect to our inner wisdom,” says Arianna Huffington, founder of the Huffington Post and advocate of daily meditation. Apps like Headspace or Insight Timer, or locally offered meditation and stress-reduction classes, can all help you find that “centering time” in your next job. 

Handshaking

Believe it or not, a handshake can speak volumes about a person. Your clammy, dead fish grip might be giving recruiters the wrong impression. Practice turning your limp handshake into a powerful grip, with locked eyes and a smile. Ask your friends, ask your family, ask people on the street to give you feedback on your handshake – this couldn’t be an easier skill to practice. 

Brainstorming

It’s not just at start-ups where ideas are shot rapid-fire around a table and onto a whiteboard (although if you’re applying to a start-up, it’s also a great skill to have).  In pretty much any job you ever have, you’re going to have to think collaboratively with other people. Practice with friends or with family to brainstorm any random topic, and see what you learn from it. 

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5 CRITICAL INTERVIEW TIPS

Professional introduction

Every interviewer asks for an introduction. A candidate should be prepared with the best 4-5 liner summary starting with his present position and job role. You should give a very crisp summary of past roles, but don’t discount your education degrees and achievements in those roles.

Personal interests

All interviewers ask for personal details as well. This question is best answered by a brief about your immediate family and should have mention of your interest. Mention those hobbies where you have won some laurels to create an impression on the interviewer.

Industry knowledge

Every interviewer will want to check your on ground know how and understanding. Make sure you know the latest trend about your industry and company in particular. It helps to talk about them in a manner where you can highlight your achievements as well.

Timeliness

Being punctual will only win you good points. Arriving late and then justifying that with excuses will spoil your reputation even before an interaction.

Politeness

Common sense is becoming uncommon. Hence wishing the interviewer, saying things like – thank you, please, pardon me (when you haven’t understood a query well), if I may add (when stating a personal opinion), have a good day, it was a pleasure meeting you all – will reflect well on you.

5 BODY LANGUAGE DISASTERS JOB SEEKERS MAKE DURING AN INTERVIEW

Not making eye contact

Failing to make eye contact was the body language mistake interviewers were most likely to say they hated. Sixty-seven percent of people surveyed said they didn’t like it when candidates kept their eyes cast down. While you don’t want to get into a creepy staring contest with your interviewer, looking at them while listening and speaking shows you’re engaged in the conversation

Playing with something on the table

Thirty-four percent of hiring managers cited fiddling with pens or shuffling papers as a major example of poor body language in an interview. Clicking a pen or similar gestures can be interpreted as a sign of anxiety.

Crossing your arms

Crossing your arms in front of your chest makes you look defensive and hostile, so it’s no wonder that 32% of HR managers said this was not something they liked to see in people they interviewed.

Not sitting up straight

Slumping in your seat doesn’t convey confidence. Thirty-one percent of HR experts said it made candidates look less than polished in an interview. Sitting up straight and squaring your shoulders not only makes you look confident, but it also shows you respect your interviewer and the situation you’re in.

Using too many hand gestures

The higher the gesture, the more out-of-control you look. The key in an interview is balance: Some hand movement keeps you from coming off as too stiff, but too much and you could look like a loose cannon.

The Two-Minute Resume Review: Where Skills Meet Results

Many of us who have chosen to navigate the constantly variable — and often unpredictable — waters of human resources are familiar with the common components of the resume. Most applications ask for them, many demand them.

With all of the resources available for candidates to search and reference for resume preparation, there is really no excuse for the submission of a sub-standard presentation of their career snapshot. The action verbs that are trending, examples of job descriptions, requirements and templates galore are literally at the fingertips of those who sit in front of a search engine. Knowing that all of these tools are at the disposal of the applicant should imply that the resume quality would be somewhat less variable among the candidate pool. So, should we even spend time on the details of what was once the only passport to the next round of the process? In short, absolutely.

The candidate who leverages the components of the application process to tailor their resume to your posting should migrate toward the top of the pile, simply because they’ll waste less of your time. To help decipher those detail-oriented applicants, here are five ways to cut through the fancy verbiage and get to predictive results, section by section:

1. Objective: “To obtain a position in…” This section can provide insight to the candidate’s maturity in the job market — it should be obvious that they’re seeking a position, so restating that concept is a waste of space that could be used further outlining their qualifications. Assessment: Skip it.

2. Education: It’s always perplexed me when I see this section toward the top, as if the candidate believes that promoting the formal aspects of their training is worth making note of first. The degree displays the candidate’s ability to learn and demonstrate proficiency in a controlled environment. Where they went to school outlines their professional network and perhaps the “culture” of learning they experienced. If the position requires a bachelor’s degree, we shouldn’t see high school graduation information as it just takes up space. And, unless specifically called for within the posting or they’re applying for a scholarship, GPA isn’t as relevant as applicants would like it to be. Assessment: Skim it.

3. Experience: Review for merely a restating of the job description, but hope for a collection of results achieved. Working backward from their most recent position, candidates should describe their experiences in terms of what they actually accomplished, not what they were responsible for. For instance, seeing the bulleted phrase “Responsible for leading a team of 15 employees to success in plastics production,” sounds important. But, were they actually successful? If the candidate has the necessary experience but fails to make their results clear, either place them in limbo until all have been reviewed or advance and target results in the behavioral interview. Assessment: Review for results.

4. References: Candidates should be selecting references specifically pertaining to the job for which they are applying, and if your hiring process requires personal and professional references, they should be included the application. The removal of required references from the resume allows the candidate more space to describe their qualifications as opposed to someone else’s contact information. The astute candidate will avoid this repetition and optimize their space. Assessment: Skip it.

5. Skills and certifications: Given the increasingly standard requirement of the bachelor’s degree, this section will often generate the most relevant substance for candidate evaluation. Unfortunately, applicants will often focus most of their efforts into a robust description of experiences and minimize the skills categorization. A candidate’s ability to demonstrate enough self-awareness to define what tools are in their toolbox will provide the hiring manager with an insight into how they may align with the responsibilities of the position, regardless of their experiences.

The increasingly popular preferences for certifications such as the PHR, PMP, SHRM-CSP, display the higher emphasis on specialization and proven skills acquisition — all accompanied by a third-party validation. This is where candidates can draw on their previous organizational experience to promote the skills obtained as well as the formal and professional experience. For example, if I see a candidate list the “Texas FFA Association” anywhere on their resume, I should expect a skills section including advanced record keeping, public speaking and communication, efficient conduct of meetings, emotionally-intelligent leadership, etc. The intuitive candidate will highlight this degree of proficiency through maximizing the skills they bring to the table as they relate to the position. Assessment: Of crucial importance — read it.

The resume’s relevance can be determined by the organization’s desire to seek insight into the candidate’s attention to detail, coupled with the hiring managers’ understanding of the relationship between skill sets and results. Experience in one position of the same name doesn’t guarantee success in another, as the cultural aspect of an organization may be enough to force a new hire to draw a little deeper into their arsenal of resources. Their resume should describe those resources in enough detail to provide a baseline for the behavioral interview, at which point you will have enough to dig a little deeper into how they’ve applied the skills to achieve results.

Two minutes spent on the resume can lead to hours saved in unfulfilling interviews and disappointing hires. Skills coupled with past results are a definite predictor of future success, and the prepared candidates will make this understanding abundantly clear.

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5 Tough HR Interview Questions Worth Preparing For

Clearing the HR interview requires dexterity in handling technical and non-technical questions with the same finesse.  it is widely believed that 90 % of the new hires fail due to behavioral skills, and the companies are putting a lot of emphasis on finding the right cultural fit, here are five HR interview questions that can throw you off the guard and reduce your chances of securing the job.

Have you ever failed in an assignment, done a poor job? Tell me about it

We don’t like talking about failures, more so during a job interview when a stranger is evaluating your candidature. However, your ability to discuss failure in a mature way goes a long way in showcasing your truthfulness and ability to learn from your mistakes. This question is one of the ways the interviewer wants to see if you can take calculated risks and learn from your mistakes. You should speak about a failure that doesn’t reveal any serious mistakes or unprofessional behavior that could potentially raise red flags about your job fitment. It best to pick a project or initiative that failed due to multiple factors and not just because of you. The best answers are the ones, which subtly showcase some of your strengths like grit, patience, persistence or tenacity.

Why do you believe that you would be good at this job?

This question is a bit confrontational, and the interviewer may be trying to test your patience. The best way to handle this question is by staying calm and confidently explains why you think you have what it takes to succeed if hired for the job. This question is a great opportunity for you to reiterate the key reasons as to why you’re an excellent candidate.

Oh you know there are many candidates for this job, why should we hire you?

One thing for sure, the interviewer isn’t demonstrating warmth or friendliness. The best way to answer this question is rephrase your key strengths or experience. The interviewer will be watching out for your confidence level while you are answering this question. They are trying to evaluate your ability to handle tough questions and situations, especially those with high stakes.

How is our industry evolving, what are the key trends?

Through this question, the interviewer is trying to test your knowledge of the industry and your wider ability to understand the macro trends. In case you are moving industries; it’s recommended that you study the latest updates; key trends and know the significant challenges the industry faces. It’s best to use google to research this question and lastly remember that the interviewer is evaluating your keenness in the job by asking this question.

Have you ever been criticised? How did you handle it?

The ability to take feedback positively is one of the biggest predictors of job success, through this question the interviewer wants to understand how you handle criticism and feedback. From your experience identify a situation in which your colleagues or manager gave you constructive feedback, and it helped you become better at the job. It’s best to stay away from highly negative feedback, or the one that highlights your weakness glaringly. The interviewer is looking for the ability to handle criticism constructively and your willingness to learn from it

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The Difference Between Knowledge, Skills and Abilities

 

Knowledge, skills, and abilities (aka KSAs) are three different things. And it’s important to know the difference – even though the difference can be subtle.

Knowledge is the theoretical or practical understanding of a subject. For example, an employee might have knowledge of the ADDIE model used in instructional design. This doesn’t mean the employee knows how to be an instructional designer. It means they know the model.

Skills are the proficiencies developed through training or experience. Using the ADDIE example, the employee has demonstrated skills in applying the ADDIE model when designing training programs. Skills are usually something that has been learned. So, we can develop our skills through the transfer of knowledge.

Abilities are the qualities of being able to do something. There is a fine line between skills and abilities. Most people would say the differentiator is whether the thing in question was learned or innate. I think of organization and prioritization as abilities that can help an employee develop their instructional design skills.

The reason we sometimes use the terms interchangeably is because they are all “must-haves” in our career. Recruiters look for knowledge, skills, and abilities during the hiring process. Managers use KSAs when they are considering employees for transfers and promotions. KSAs are used as the company creates and updates their replacement and succession plans.

As we talk more about the skills gap, it will be important to understand the difference because the way we obtain knowledge, skills, and abilities can vary. And if we’re an organization trying to figure out how to solve the skills gap that exists within our workforce, then we have to link the right solutions.

For instance, if the issue is knowledge, then maybe we can create an in-house library that employees can check out books on the topics. But if the challenge is skills, the answer might be training. And if abilities need to be improved, is it possible to develop personal action plans that give employees the opportunity to refine their abilities.

Thank goodness we have the terminology purists to correct us on the words. There are times when it’s fine to use the terms interchangeably and others when we need to emphasize the exact term. Regardless, they’re all equally important.

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10 Creative Recruiting Strategies To Hire Great People

In this job market, you’ll have to do things differently if you want to avoid sifting through a huge stack of poor-fit resumes — or if you want to reach your dream candidates who already have a job elsewhere.

That’s why many companies are embracing creative recruiting.

From adding interactive group interviews to the recruiting process to actively looking for talent in unusual places, we’ve created a list of ways companies are innovating the hiring process.

These methods can make your business stand out from the crowd and put you in touch with your ideal hires.

Use self-selection to find out who’s really interested:

To help you better separate the wheat from the chaff, you should try adding another layer between resume-submission and the one-on-one interview. One option is inviting all eligible applicants to an open group event, such as an Open House
The Open House strategy also enables you to see how people interact in groups
 

Arrange for group interaction:

Interacting with potential candidates in a group setting is an excellent way to see their character, level of interest, working knowledge, and communication skills. It also lets you see if they’re a good fit with your corporate culture.

Interactive interviews can be conducted in different ways, but the fundamental feature is inviting select candidates in for a group session, where you and current employees can engage with them.

Handpick dream candidates and show them you want them:

Passive candidates (those who are already employed and not actively jobhunting) are most likely to be your dream hires, but you’ll never attract them without letting them know how much you want them.

Reaching out in a really personal manner demonstrates that you’re willing to go out of your way to get their attention.

Look for talent in unlikely places:

The Director of Talent Acquisition at Quicken Loans tells the New York Times how his company (which is regularly listed in Fortune’s “100 best places to work”) hires fast while maintaining its corporate culture standards: by looking for great people in unexpected places.

For example, the company once conducted a “blitz” of local retail stores and restaurants, sending employees out to interact with workers and offer interviews to those who really stood out.

“Too many companies focus on industry experience when they recruit… We can teach people about finance. We can’t teach passion, urgency and a willingness to go the extra mile,” Quicken tells the NYT.

Attend events that are NOT job fairs:

Job fairs often turn out to be somewhat useless, since the best candidates probably already have a job. So you should try looking great talent at other events that aren’t traditionally recruiting-related.

Search forums such as Meetup for group events that are likely to be attended by people qualified for your open position.

For example, if you needed a graphic designer in New York City, you could attend a graphic design-focused meetup in the area and look for potential candidates. You’ll already know they’re passionate about what they do, and you’ll be able to get a feel for what they’re like in person.

Make yourself stand out with non-traditional media:

A written job description on a jobsearch site won’t necessarily make you stand out. A video or podcast, however, will do just that.

Using non-traditional recruiting media is also a chance for you to convey something about your corporate culture to jobseekers.

Whether it’s through a fun video on YouTube showing how awesome it is to be an employee at your business, or a recorded podcast describing the position and your company.

this strategy will differentiate you from all the other recruiters out there — and hopefully make you more appealing to the cream of the crop hires.

Actively search profiles and social networking sites:

Rather than sifting through the hundreds of bad-fit resumes you might get in response to your job post, take the search into your own hands. That way, you’ll only see candidates who have the criteria that you want for the position.

Several websites allow candidates to create profiles that include their resumes and other details that can give recruiters a better understanding of their knowledge and talents.

Visual CV is another reputable place to look through candidate profiles.

You’ll not only be able to screen for the perfect resume, but you’ll also have a chance to learn a little more about that person pre-interview.

Advertise in places frequented by your ideal candidate:

You should definitely focus your recruitment process in ways and places that fit with your dream hire. Online communities, as opposed to all-inclusive job boards, are another good place to target your recruitment process at a specific demographic. For example, if you’re looking for a developer, try searching for the terms “developer forum”; you’ll find multiple places just for developers where you can publicize that you’re hiring.

Consider past candidates:

Former rejections could make great hires now.

In the past, you may passed over a good candidate for some reason or another — perhaps their salary requirements were too high, or they weren’t an ideal for that other position.

Whatever the reason, if you think they would be good for this opportunity, it can’t hurt to get in touch with them now and see if they’re interested.

Publicize referral incentives:

Referrals are excellent sources for great hires. You just have to let people know that you’re looking, and maybe offer an incentive to send someone your way.

A financial reward for the referrer is standard if you end up hiring their referral; if the referrer is an employee, non-monetary perks can work, too (i.e. a premiere parking spot for the year, extra vacation days, etc.).

To publicize outside the company, a great way to to spread the word is to include a note in your e-mail signature indicating that you’re hiring and what you’re looking for.

Use LinkedIn for recruiting:

LinkedIn doesn’t have the buzz or the customer base of Facebook or a Twitter, but it has quietly changed the way many jobs get filled. While you are unlikely to land your next job as a car mechanic using the professional social network, LinkedIn has become ubiquitous in the business world.

Big corporations and professional recruiters pay through the nose for premium LinkedIn features, but even the basic service can be a powerful recruiting tool if you know how to use it. Here’s how to get the most out of LinkedIn without breaking the bank.

5 WAYS TALENT ACQUISITION IS DIFFERENT FROM RECRUITMENT

The terms “recruitment” and “talent acquisition” are often used interchangeably and thought to mean the same thing — a lexicon used to describe the multitude of processes involved in the finding and hiring of candidates. Yet, recruitment and talent acquisition are not the same thing. Understanding the differences between them and adapting your hiring process accordingly can help you hire top talent better.

Let’s begin by defining the two terms.

RECRUITMENT

A linear process that involves searching for a specific candidate to fill a specific position. Recruitment is reactive: a position is vacated or created and a new person must be found to fill it. The core function of recruiting is to find candidates for existing jobs that are currently available.

TALENT ACQUISITION

Instead of a linear process, talent acquisition is a cyclical approach that’s geared towards building relationships, anticipating future hiring needs, and creating a sustainable pool of candidates. It’s a more strategic approach that develops and nurtures a talent pipeline with a long-term view.

Now that we have defined the terms, here are the elements that differentiate talent acquisition from recruitment.

  1. Planning and Strategy
    Establishing a solid talent acquisition strategy needs a lot of planning. Unlike recruitment, talent acquisition requires a deeper look at the nature of your business and an understanding of future workplace needs.It’s a forward-thinking approach, looking through a wider lens, that takes into consideration the local and global labor markets. Since talent acquisition doesn’t happen in a vacuum, the process involves more planning and strategist.
  2. Workforce Segmentation
    Talent acquisition depends on understanding the different work segments within a company, as well as the different positions within those segments.Not only do you need a thorough understanding of your company’s inner workings, you must also know the skills, experiences, and competencies that each position requires for success.
  3. Employer Branding
    More than ever before, brands are going beyond attracting consumers to attracting talent. Ensuring that your company’s brand is clear and attractive is a main element in talent acquisition.This involves fostering a positive image and company culture, and establishing a good reputation based on quality products and services. A solid brand attracts top candidates while giving them a look inside at what it’s like to work for your company.
  4. Talent Scoping and Management
    Top talent comes from many different places. Through talent acquisition, you’re researching and recognizing the different places where you can source candidates.Once you’ve established contact with potential candidates, you have to maintain and build those relationships. All of this is done with the understanding that most of these candidates will not fill positions right away but rather down the line.
  5. Metrics and Analytics
    Finally, no talent acquisition strategy is complete without using key metrics to conduct proper tracking and analysis.By collecting and analyzing pertinent information, you can continuously improve your recruiting process and make better hiring decisions, ultimately improving your quality of hire.

One thing to note is that recruitment is a part of talent acquisition. However, to only engage in recruitment is a bit like putting the cart before the horse. All of the elements listed above are necessary in order to implement a strategy that will allow companies to attract, recruit, and maintain top talent.

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What you must do to get a job !!

Gone are the days, where one used to stay in the same organisation for years together. Employees change jobs regularly depending on greener pastures available elsewhere. Therefore, organisations have also started taking interviews seriously in the hope of landing skilled and stable employees who can prove to be valuable asset in the long run.

More and more people analytics is being used to help organisations identify the right person for the right jobs. In order to ensure that you crack interviews in 2017, here are a few skills that you can use:

1. Build the right resume: The primary objective to a resume is to get you to the next stage i.e. the interview process. It should be properly structured with primary objective in mind. To move ahead from other resume’s one might want to add additional sections like: Objectives/ Long Terms Goals/ How I can add value/ Achievements etc. Get creative so that your profile stands out from all the others out.

2. Prepare in advance: The interview needs preparation which very few people understand. Very few times, do we come across employers who do their homework before taking the interview. Generally, they start with “tell me something about yourself” while they quickly skim through your resume hunting for their next question. This is the question that you should prepare for and rehearse before you go for the interview. Take time and prepare an interesting and engaging response which will tilt the balance in your favor from the start!

3. Research the company and the person: This is, by far, the most important step that you should carry out before you venture out to present yourself. Go through the company website to look at the organisationculture and products. Look whether they are financially sound. It is also important to see whether you can find out something about the person who will interview you.

4. Be tech savvy: Computer skills are becoming more and more important with each passing day. Your target should be to become an expert with using technology to your advantage. Brush up your MS office Skills and for people in marketing, learn about digital marketing. You can showcase these in your resume and Interview which will again help you stand out.

5. Clean up your social media accounts: Many people now-a-days are stalked by the HR department on social media. Be careful at all times what you post and what it conveys. Keep all your accounts clean of any objectionable comments.

6. Lead the interview: You might not know it but there is always a way to lead the interview. Answer questions in such a way so that the interviewer is curious to ask the next question on the same subject. There are times when you might be asked about your experience on some project or elaborate on your achievements. You can lead these questions to areas that you are most comfortable discussing. This way, you can put your best foot forward and impress the interviewer(s).

7. Ask insightful questions – Many interviewers give you an opportunity to ask questions at the end of the interview. You could do some preparation for this also. Ask insightful questions about the role and the organisation. Also, try to judge from their response whether they are favorable towards your candidature or against.
Lastly, always be well dressed, relaxed and confident. These characteristics show through and add to your personality.

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Employer Brand vs. Talent Brand: Why the Difference Matters

Maybe you’ve heard (or even used) the term “employer brand” without being completely sure what it means and how it’s different from the concept of “talent brand.” If so, I won’t tell anyone—and I’m here to help clear things up.

Coined in 1996, employer brand is a relatively new niche that falls under the larger umbrella of talent attraction. While talent brand and employer brand have some areas of overlap, these two terms have several key differences.

Most of those differences are tied to the voice of your potential hires, or your audience. Make no mistake, you have lots of audiences. In fact, I always say that there are at least three sides to every story. Let’s take a closer look at what makes these concepts distinct and why they’re both important to your business’s reputation as an employer.

The benefits and risks of employer branding

An employer brand is all about storytelling. It encompasses how you want your organization to be perceived and the specific messaging you use when sharing information about your company.

Companies have a great deal of control over their employer brand marketing, which can sometimes cause problems—like when multiple companies turn to the same messaging again and again. Do these phrases sound familiar?

  • Our people are our greatest asset.
  • We have amazing benefits and perks.
  • We offer career development and progression.
  • We’re the most innovative company in our space.

These seem like great claims at first, but after the 27th time a prospective employee hears the phrase “We have the best people,” it can start to lose meaning. This is what I like to call ‘Employer Branding.’

It makes matters worse if these claims turn out to be inaccurate, which happens more often than you might think. Even if an organization’s leaders mean well, they can develop a warped view of their employees’ experiences.

And when companies attempt to sell an inaccurate or inauthentic brand to potential employees, it could cost them in both the long-term and short-term when it comes to talent attraction, employee engagement and employee retention.

Your talent brand is forged by honest voices inside your organization

According to TalentBrand.Org*, your talent brand is “the honest story of life as an employee inside your organization, as told by the employees in parallel with the company.”

So how can you make sure your idea of your brand lines up with the reality of what employees are saying? That’s where a holistic view of your reputation comes in.

While your employer brand can be shaped and honed by your organization’s leaders, talent brand comes directly from employee experiences and feedback.

In other words, your talent brand is not what one website or channel says it is. Current, past and even prospective employees shape your talent brand through social media posts, review site comments, direct network conversations, face-to-face interactions and referrals.

On Indeed’s Company Pages, for example, you’ll learn what people are saying about your company’s culture, management, pay, benefits, work-life balance, job security and advancement opportunities.

This feedback from real employees provides a valuable touch point and reality check for company leaders who want to make sure their employer brand accurately reflects employee experiences. Again, this is just one piece of the Talent Brand puzzle that you need to examine.

The value in the overlap

Companies can get the most from their talent brand and employee brand identities when they consider these two concepts together. That’s why Indeed’s Company Pages feature employer-created videos and social feeds alongside reviews and ratings directly from employees.

How do I know which channels are important enough to monitor? I look at where I’m getting the biggest sources of candidate traffic.

Bringing these two types of branding together helps you visualize the overlap between the way you view your brand and how employees see your company. This area of overlap can shed new light on where the heart of your brand actually lives.

By focusing on the aspects of your brand that employees truly appreciate, you’ll get a stronger sense of which of your company’s unique perks and attributes you should amplify and share more widely, to attract the types of people you’re looking to hire.

And who knows? It may even mean you can swap out that “we have the best people” line for something that’s a much better fit.

Source: http://indeedhi.re/2zhPSgm