7 Facts Recruiters Look for in Your CV !!

                 

Most business decisions are based on hard cold facts, and hiring decisions are no different. If an organisation is going to invest time and money into employing you; they will need to see evidence that you can perform.

By now we all know that clichés and buzzwords do nothing to impress recruiters, but many candidates still do not fully understand which facts are sought in a CV. When writing your role descriptions in particular; you should put yourself in the hiring manager’s shoes and think about the evidence you would require to make an informed hiring decision.

Including the following details in your CV’s role descriptions will provide clarity to recruiters and support the case for interviewing and eventually hiring you.

1. Your position in the hierarchy:

If a hiring manager is going to bring you on board, then it’s crucial for them to understand where they can place you within their team. Whether you are sitting at the top of the pile and overseeing large scale operations; leading a small team or working independently with nobody under your management; you need to make your position clear. Be sure to describe who you report to, whether you manage anybody and which people are dependent on you.

2. Who you interact with:

Human interaction plays a vital role in the running of any organisation, so hiring managers will need to be satisfied that you are comfortable dealing with people. Most jobs will require you to interact with a wide range of individuals, so your CV should demonstrate you are capable of this. Show exactly who you interact with from customers and suppliers to management and external regulators; to prove your business-social abilities. Evidence that you can build strong working relationships, and use them to create beneficial outcomes for your employers.

3. Technology expertise:

Technology is used in every line of work; from computer based tools like programming languages and accountancy software, through to hardware such as production machinery and vehicles. Most roles will require some working knowledge of one or more tools, so employers will be keen to understand your ability to use their core systems and hardware. So whether you’re an expert coder or a sports car technician, it’s essential to detail the tools you are able to use and how you apply them within your roles.

4. Work Produced:

The work that you produce will vary greatly depending on your industry.  It could be anything from Excel reports or website pages, to physical products like mobile phones or even buildings. Whatever tangible work you produce within your own roles, include it within your CV and be clear on the volumes you have produced, quality of the work, and how valuable they are to your customers or internal dependents.

5. What your employer actually does:

This may seem obvious, but a surprisingly few candidates include a sufficient explanation of their employers. Before you delve into the specifics of your roles, it’s important that the recruiter understands who you work for and what they do. Without building context around your role, it will be difficult for readers to fully understand your work. However the level of detail you need to include will vary depending on the organisation.

If you work for relatively small business, it’s less likely that recruiters will have heard of them; so you will need to provide a full explanation of the services they offer and markets they operate in. However if you work for a household brand then you will need to place more focus on describing the department you work in, and how it’s function contributes to the success of the wider business.

6. The objective of your roles:

The most important aspect that recruiters will want to know about your previous jobs, is what were you hired to do? It’s all well and good writing a detailed list of your daily activities, meetings and presentations; but without outlining the high level purpose of your role, nobody will understand what all your hard work was for. Every role should start with a clear objective statement so that readers can comprehend the bigger picture of your duties.

7. Numbers:

Recruiters will look for numbers in your CV as a means of quantifying your value to an employer. Figures can provide strong evidence of the return on investment that an employer can expect after hiring you. For example, if you can provide some statistics around revenue that you’ve generated for a firm, or the value of a project you have supported, they are a great way to demonstrate your value. But the figures do not always have to be monetary; you can include figures such as; percentages of targets achieved or time taken to deliver a piece of work.

By including some of the facts above in your own CV role descriptions, you will prove your worth to recruiters and greatly increase your chances of landing job interviews.

15 CV Mistakes Costing You Interviews !!

15-cv-mistakes-costing-you-interviews

 

 

Your CV is an important part of your armoury when looking for a job. It has to look good and be as close as possible to the job description to get you through to the next stage. As one of the first documents that someone will ask for to represent your capabilities, your CV should be completed with focus, time and care.

If you’re guilty of any of the below 15 CVmistakes, you’re probably costing yourself some great interviews:

  1. Bad formatting:

Your CV should be formatted perfectly. It should be consistent throughout in terms of bullets, text and margins. Your CV should be readable on a mobile device as well as on a computer screen; so ensure it displays perfectly for both. Saving it as a PDF is a great way to ensure it is easy to read on tablets and phones. There is no excuse for untidy, inconsistent formatting. Check once, and then double check this!

  1. No contact details:

These should be clear, correct and visible. Perhaps they could be in a header to ensure they are easy to find if the pages are not kept together.

  1. Too many pages:

The ideal length of a CV is two pages.

  1. Jam-packed paragraphs:

Your CV should be split up clearly with bullet points. HR professionals and recruiters want to read the relevant information quickly and easily, and will not waste hours reading through long scripts.

  1. Hidden information:

Your CV needs to match as closely as possible to the job description or job requirements. Often CVs are selected via key words so the words that appear on your ideal job description should also (if you have the experience) appear on your CV.

  1. A rush-job:

Rushing to produce a CV without really thinking through and analysing what it is that you want to do next. Take your time to analyse yourself; self-awareness and knowing what you want and are suited to should be your first step before producing your CV. Real freedom to choose and some control over what you now want must involve some self-awareness work first. My book What to do next? is a practical exercise book which can help you with this (available on Amazon).

  1. Wordy profile statement:

Your profile statement needs to be short, strong, snappy and not generic. They need to be objective. In one or two sentences summarise and emphasise your key attributes, experience and your intended future career path.

  1. No summary of skills:

These should be clearly visible, don’t hide them. Some people like the top part of their CV to look like a snap shot of your experience. Your skills should be bulleted and separated and can appear under your profile statement so the reader can quickly see them.

  1. Inconsistent, incorrect tenses:

I often see CVs where the starting word is in the wrong tense. If you are currently working there, it should read, for example: Reviewing, Liaising etc. If, however, it is a previous role, it should read: Reviewed, Liaised. It’s an obvious one, but I see it on almost every CV that crosses my desk. Perhaps this is because people update their CV as they go, and don’t necessarily go back to change old roles.

  1. Overuse of one particular word:

Again a regular mistake that I see. People often have one word that they repeat over and over again – watch out for this, it is often the first word of your responsibility bullet points. Ask a couple of people to read through and check your CV for you.

  1. Omitting relevant qualifications/training/courses:

Often people miss internal training or courses that they have done in the past. List all of them.

  1. Failure to quantify things:

A great way to add strength to your bullet points is to add numbers and percentages. What did you do, what was the outcome, can you quantify it?

  1. Unorganised bullet points:

I prefer CV’s that have clear bullet points for each position. They can be easily read and are clear. Even within those bullet points think about which ones are at the top. The first two bullet points position you. Think about which are most impressive or most relevant to the job you are applying to and put them first.

  1. Lack of tailoring:

For those good important jobs that you really want make sure you tweak your CV and pull out the most relevant experience and information that you can. Change the order of bullets, add figures. Go through the job specification and match your CV as closely as you can to it.  Take time over this.

  1. No references:

Have them. Either references on request or list the names of two individuals you have asked at the bottom of your CV.

fixing these problems in your Cv will help a great deal with your job search, however you should also make sure your social media profiles match the calibre of your CV. Make sure your Linked In profile gets just as much attention. The two will work together and these days both need to be strong. Also, be careful not to use too much jargon and simplify your language where possible. Some industry jargon is necessary for key word searches, but try to stay away from inter-company jargon all over your CV – it will only alienate the reader.

Finally, don’t forget to do your research. Find out as much as you can about the company you’re applying for; the culture, job description, their social media presence. Try to gain a true understanding of what they are looking for before you apply. Decide then if that is what you want and if the answer is yes, tailor your CV with your relevant experience and attributes to match that.

 

Source: http://bit.ly/2dOPb4B

9 Habits of Every Successful Recruiter !!

 Have you ever wondered why good specialists are sometimes rejected by one company as unprofessional, yet accepted by another as a gem? The “army” of any company hugely depends on its recruiter skills. Some of them have those qualities, others don’t, losing their best candidates without even listening to them.

Being a recruiter is a difficult job, as you have to also be psychologists, business planners, market researchers, social studies specialists, etc. Working with people, judging their skills and character, foreseeing their behavior within the company’s team – it’s a hard-to-accomplish work.

1. Be responsive.

A recruiter that responds openly and clearly to every question is always more valuable. Candidates feel more confident having some information about the company and knowing their inquiries will be answered as quickly as possible. Also, make sure you keep a professional yet friendly tone, to make people feel comfortable.

2. Be patient and listen.

The ability to listen is one of the most important recruiter skill, as many candidates have something to say. In many cases, the stories applicants tell can show a lot of their qualities, which may be useful for the company. It’s important to listen to both the candidates and managers who need new employees, and state requirements for them.

3. Involve other employees.

Turns out, 52% of content shared by any company’s employees, in persona or online, is trusted by applicants. Let them talk to current employees, ask the latter to post information about the company on social networks, and you will be trusted. It’s logical, as more people would trust a friend who works for the company than its marketing department.

4. Add personal touch.

Sometimes recruiters judge candidates by the first impression: their appearance, clothes, way of talking etc. However, when attending an interview, a person hardly knows what attitude or way of talking is required, not mentioning standard rules. Allow yourself to use your recruiter skills to work on the person, guide them to the right place. Candidates often become the best employees if you add your personal touch, by having a good talk to them and giving them a piece of advice.

5. Foresee the future.

Every company must have some plans for the future: new projects, new ways of operating, etc. Look into these plans when talking to a candidate, and see if they fit into the future of the company. The person may be not the best choice for now but could be vital in a couple of months, and you want them to be already used to the company’s rules and operations when you need them.

6. Manage your time.

Time management is one of the best recruiter skills, as there’s a lot to do. Make sure you manage your time well, and don’t delay reviewing resumes you get. Even a couple of days may determine whether you will get a top candidate or not.

7. Have a modern vision.

In the age of online activities, it’s almost impossible to keep being modern without using the advantages of the internet. A good recruiter will use anything that can potentially improve their search. Use social media to advertise vacancies, find people, and answer simple questions. This will save you much time and effort, give more candidates a chance to interview, and help choose the right person. Only 33% of employers use such an approach, so you have a chance to be in the progressive third.

8. Cooperate with the manager.

Get a perfect understanding of what your manager wants by cooperating with them. Update the manager about every candidate that catches your attention and don’t hesitate if you need to update them on any further requirements. This will make the process of choosing the right candidate more productive.

9. Keep top applicants engaged.

Don’t make top applicants think you aren’t interested in them anymore, or they will start their search again. Encourage them to contact you with further questions, ask some yourself, invite them for another interview, or give them test assignments.

Be loyal and communicate well, give recommendations, and keep candidates engaged in the process. Think about the future of the company and whether the person will fit in, and use modern technologies to get a wider view. The aforementioned recruiter skills are simple and proven to be useful for many companies.

7 Ways To Impress A Recruiter On Your Next Job Interview !!

Recruiters and hiring managers have seen every trick and gimmick in the book when it comes to interviews. Sometimes they work – but when it comes down to it, whether you’re wearing purple stilettos stilettos or looking the interviewer in the eye, it’s the content of the interview that matters in the long run.

So what can you do that will really impress a recruiter? Ace your next interview with these tips:

1. Know your experience:

It’s amazing how many people stumble over what should be the easiest questions – you’re just talking about yourself! Look over your resume as you prep for the interview. Think about some of the most important projects you’ve worked on, what you liked and didn’t like about each job, and acknowledge some of the biggest challenges you’ve faced – and how you overcame them – in each role. Be ready to explain any “sketchy” details – leaving a job without another one lined up, gaps in work history, etc. You’ll have an easier time explaining and applying your experience when you know the basics like the back of your hand.

2. Know the impact that your experience:

One of the best ways to impress a recruiter is to quantify the impact you had in previous roles. Recruiters want to hear about what you’ve done and how you did it, but understanding the big picture and the impact of your work is also important. Be prepared to answer questions about outcomes – maybe a monetary savings, increasing efficiency, or an improved customer experience – and how your work played a role. Sharing outcomes lets the recruiter know that you’re able to follow a project through from start to finish and understand the big picture.

3. Apply your past experience to the job you’re interviewing for:

Take the challenges and outcomes you’ve already discussed and apply them to the role you’re interviewing for. It’s great to know what you’ve done, but applying that to what the company is currently doing is what will land you the job. Mention specific goals this position is intended to meet or qualities the organization is seeking (you can glean this information from the job posting as well as the initial phone screen) and discuss how you can use your skills to meet those requirements.

4. Have a conversation:

More often than not recruiters expect candidates to do most of the talking in the interview, but in a perfect world, the interview would be a conversation between both parties – after all, you’re both trying to figure out if you’re right for each other. Find something in common with the interviewer, and do your research on the organization to come armed with the information you need. Straight Q&A sessions can get pretty boring for recruiters, so you’ll stand out if you can get the recruiter engaged in the conversation.

5. Ask the right questions:

Keep the conversation flowing by asking questions that add value to the interview. Interview questions like these are great to ask in an early interview (i.e., your phone screening with a recruiter), but they don’t add a lot of value to the conversation in further rounds. Your interview questions should align more closely with what you already know about the job, and highlight the skills that you bring to the table.

6. Talk about the organization’s culture, and how you fit:

Most organizations showcase their culture via their website or social media. Do they post funny sayings, or pictures of community events? Or do they stick strictly to product offerings and marketing communications? Investigate these sites thoroughly before your interview to get a sense of how casual or formal you will be expected to operate both in the interview and if you get the job. By better understanding the organization’s culture, you’ll be able to provide better examples of how you’ll be a fit for their team. Company culture questions like these are a great way to bring this up in the interview.

7. Send a thoughtful follow-up note after your interview:

Pick out the most important points from your interview – whether it was something new you learned about the organization, a conversation topic where you really hit it off with the team, or a particular skill you might have forgotten to elaborate on – and send a short follow up within a day of your interview. You can use this note to remind them why you’re the best candidate for the role – based on your experience and your knowledge – not on tricks and gimmicks. Click here for tips and examples on how to write a job interview thank you letter.

7 Facts Recruiters Look for in Your CV !!

Most business decisions are based on hard cold facts, and hiring decisions are no different. If an organisation is going to invest time and money into employing you; they will need to see evidence that you can perform.

By now we all know that clichés and buzzwords do nothing to impress recruiters, but many candidates still do not fully understand which facts are sought in a CV. When writing your role descriptions in particular; you should put yourself in the hiring manager’s shoes and think about the evidence you would require to make an informed hiring decision. Including the following details in your CV’s role descriptions will provide clarity to recruiters and support the case for interviewing and eventually hiring you.

1. Your position in the hierarchy:

If a hiring manager is going to bring you on board, then it’s crucial for them to understand where they can place you within their team. Whether you are sitting at the top of the pile and overseeing largescale operations; leading a small team or working independently with nobody under your management; you need to make your position clear. Be sure to describe who you report to, whether you manage anybody and which people are dependent on you.

2. Who you interact with:

Human interaction plays a vital role in the running of any organisation, so hiring managers will need to be satisfied that you are comfortable dealing with people. Most jobs will require you to interact with a wide range of individuals, so your CV should demonstrate you are capable of this. Show exactly who you interact with from customers and suppliers to management and external regulators; to prove your business-social abilities. Evidence that you can build strong working relationships, and use them to create beneficial outcomes for your employers.

3. Technology expertise:

Technology is used in every line of work; from computer based tools like programming languages and accountancy software, through to hardware such as production machinery and vehicles. Most roles will require some working knowledge of one or more tools, so employers will be keen to understand your ability to use their core systems and hardware. So whether you’re an expert coder or a sports car technician, it’s essential to detail the tools you are able to use and how you apply them within your roles.

4. Work Produced:

The work that you produce will vary greatly depending on your industry.  It could be anything from Excel reports or website pages, to physical products like mobile phones or even buildings. Whatever tangible work you produce within your own roles, include it within your CV and be clear on the volumes you have produced, quality of the work, and how valuable they are to your customers or internal dependents.

5. What your employer actually does:

This may seem obvious, but a surprisingly few candidates include a sufficient explanation of their employers. Before you delve into the specifics of your roles, it’s important that the recruiter understands who you work for and what they do. Without building context around your role, it will be difficult for readers to fully understand your work. However the level of detail you need to include will vary depending on the organisation.

If you work for relatively small business, it’s less likely that recruiters will have heard of them; so you will need to provide a full explanation of the services they offer and markets they operate in. However if you work for a household brand then you will need to place more focus on describing the department you work in, and how it’s function contributes to the success of the wider business.

6. The objective of your roles:

The most important aspect that recruiters will want to know about your previous jobs, is what were you hired to do? It’s all well and good writing a detailed list of your daily activities, meetings and presentations; but without outlining the high level purpose of your role, nobody will understand what all your hard work was for. Every role should start with a clear objective statement so that readers can comprehend the bigger picture of your duties.

7. Numbers:

Recruiters will look for numbers in your CV as a means of quantifying your value to an employer. Figures can provide strong evidence of the return on investment that an employer can expect after hiring you. For example, if you can provide some statistics around revenue that you’ve generated for a firm, or the value of a project you have supported, they are a great way to demonstrate your value. But the figures do not always have to be monetary; you can include figures such as; percentages of targets achieved or time taken to deliver a piece of work.

By including some of the facts above in your own CV role descriptions, you will prove your worth to recruiters and greatly increase your chances of landing job interviews.

5 Ways to Know if You’re Applying for the Wrong Job !!

The process of looking for a new job is quite seductive, especially when it comes to the application stage. When we see something we want to apply to we sometimes fall in love with the idea of the job title, salary package or amount of international travel. The seductiveness of a role can sometimes blind us to the fact that it’s not the right job for us. If you walk into the wrong job, you’re going to be unhappy. It’s just a question of how long it’ll take for you to realise how unhappy you are. The sooner you see the signs that a job you’re applying to is wrong for you, the better. Here are a few examples of such signs.

1.       Recruiter Doesn’t Say Much About The Organisation’s Individuals

If you’re job hunting with the help of recruitment agencies, don’t just assume that every vacancy they pitch to you is right for you. Always remember that a recruiter isn’t necessarily there to boost your career by putting your needs first; they put employers first in order to earn commission.  You should pay particular attention to what an agency says about an employer’s existing employees – if anything at all. A recruiter might brief you on everything else to do with the organisation but if they haven’t had any particularly positive experiences with the people who work there, they won’t want to say too much about them. If this is the case, that speaks volumes about what it would be like to actually work in such a place.

2.       Employer’s Response to Your Application

If you get a response from an employer you’ve applied to that’s always good but there may be something about the tone of the reply that doesn’t resonate with you. If there’s something you just don’t like about the response, trust your gut instinct and think hard about whether you really want to accept the invitation to the interview or assessment.

3.       The Feeling You Get When You Visit

When you get to the point of going to meet an employer, how do you feel when you arrive? How good is the person meeting and greeting you at putting you at ease? You can tell a lot from just walking into a company’s reception. Think about the level of respect the receptionist shows you when you arrive, because they really should be respecting everyone who walks in, regardless of who they are and what they’ve come for. They should be making you feel that you’re important to them, whoever you are.

4.       The Way You’re Treated During the Interview

If you’re not treated well during the job interview, that doesn’t bode well for the actual job. After all, the employer should be trying to sell itself to you just as you’re selling yourself to it. Its employees should be persuading you that this is the right place to work just as much as you’re persuading them that you’re the right person for the job. You know you’re being treated right in an interview if it takes place in a comfortable and presentable room, you’re offered something to drink and the interviewer is prepared.

5.       How the Conversation Goes

In the interview, did you feel that learnt what you needed to? Was the interview rushed? How did the interviewer behave towards you? Did they bother following up afterwards?

Once you put these different elements together you’ll know whether a specific job is likely to be the right one for you.

Why Being a Confident Leader is Important !!

It’s worth investing the time and effort into working on your self-confidence. Confidence breeds confidence. Once you start getting more confident in your leadership role, the positive impact it will have on you and your organisation will act as a catalyst for you to perpetually become even more confident.

A major factor that holds a lot of us back from being confident is the fear that people will perceive us as arrogant. This is not necessarily true—there’s nothing wrong with being assertive and most people you come into contact with in your position as a leader will be able to tell the difference between assertiveness and arrogance. Remember that if you exude confidence, your subordinates, peers and business associates are likely to be confident in you and the issues that you are leading.

If you feel you have nothing to be confident about, reflect on your skills – would you really have got to where you are today if you didn’t have any qualities or talents that are worth being confident in? Reflecting on our strengths and the wealth of our experiences is not a natural state for humans to be in, so you’ll have to consciously sit down and make a list of the things you’re good at and the value that your various experiences have added to your skill set. If you really can’t think of any strengths, ask those who know you well what they are.

Enhancing your levels of confidence isn’t something you have to do by yourself, even if you’re supposed to be ‘the one in charge’. Don’t be afraid to seek support, no matter how senior your position. Ask your employer about training, as specific courses in self-assertiveness or public speaking can help you in areas of confidence that you’re struggling with. Look into whether there are any such in-house training opportunities that the organisation can sign you up for. Alternatively, consider attending external training. Taking a day or two off work to attend an outside course is a worthy investment into your professional and personal development.

In addition to formal training, advice and support from your superiors and peers can often be useful. Keep lines of communication with your employer well open and don’t be afraid to discuss matters with them. By having a good relationship with those associated with your work, you’re likely to feel confident in your work environment.

Sometimes you may have to act confidently before you really feel confident. By holding yourself properly, speaking with authority, voicing your opinions and taking immediate charge of situations, you’ll begin to build genuine confidence, even if it isn’t there to start with. Acting confidently will lead to you believing you can be genuinely confident—and, in time, you will be.

Source: http://bit.ly/2pw8DX0

How To Become A More Decisive Leader !!

There is a pervasive myth in business that the best leaders are the ones that make the best decisions. However, recent studies have shown that this isn’t necessarily the case.

According to a recent study published in Harvard Business Review, one of the four things that set successful CEOs apart is the ability to make decisions with speed and conviction.

As it turns out, the outcome of any given decision is typically less important for an organization than how the decision was made.

I found this insight to be particularly interesting because I’ve had the opportunity to work as both a strategist and a CEO throughout my career.

As a strategist, my job was to think. I relished in intellectual complexity that came along with deep dives into various issues impacting the business. Naturally, I brought this approach to bear at BodeTree once I became CEO.

However, I quickly learned that my overly-academic approach to decision making caused unforeseen problems. My decision process led to frustrating bottlenecks inside of the organization and caused a type of paralysis that spread through the team.

As it turns out, the talents and skills that make a great strategist become a detriment when you make the jump to the role of CEO. I had to unlearn what I had learned and develop an entirely new framework for making decisions. 

In doing so, I realized that there were three key aspects that I had to master to become a more decisive leader.

1)Practice reflective urgency:

The first skill I had to master was that of reflective urgency, which is the ability to consciously and rapidly reflect on the priorities, resources, and needs of the moment.

For me, this came down to developing and maintaining a balanced “big picture” view of the business as a whole.

I realized that I had to be constantly aware of the most important near-term priorities and balance them with their long-term impact and the resources I had available at the moment.

Reflective urgency is a form of integrated thinking, where two conflicting ideas are held and explored at the same time. In this scenario, I learned to find the most direct path to the most important priority of the moment.

The resulting path is one that makes sense to me but often looks circuitous and confusing to members of my team. However, the benefits that resulted from the clarity and conviction of my decision outweighed any confusion in the near-term.

2)Determine your data threshold:

Earlier in my career, I wanted to gather 100% of the available data before even contemplating making a decision. Of course, looking back I realize just how ridiculous this was.

In real life leadership roles, you’ll never have all of the information and data before having to make a decision. There are just too many variables and unknowns out there.

Any attempt to gather that much information will bring your decision-making process to a grinding halt, paralyzing both you and your organization.

Instead, leaders have to get comfortable with their personal “data thresholds.” Personally, I’m comfortable making a definitive decision once I have about 65% of the story in place. It’s just enough to know the direction and magnitude of the decision at hand and to weigh the most salient facts.

Everybody’s data threshold is different, but it’s important that it’s under 80%. Going any higher will only slow you and the rest of your team down.

3)Remember that a wrong decision is better than no decision at all:

There are few decisions in life or business that cannot be reversed or modified. We tend to treat all business decisions as life-or-death, as though we’re being graded based on the effectiveness of the outcomes.

Of course, outcomes do matter, but it’s rare that they’re permanent. Good leaders recognize that they will inevitably make a wrong decision at some point along the way.  This realization is incredibly freeing and enables leaders to make decisions more rapidly and keep things in perspective.

It’s important for leaders to remember that how a decision is made is often more important than the decision itself. Leaders who make decisions with speed and conviction might not always get things right, but they’ll be able to keep their organization moving forward.

Wrong decisions can be fixed, but indecisiveness will damage your organization and reputation beyond repair.  

Five Job-Search Tactics That Work And That Don’t !!

One of the biggest problems for job-seekers is that the standard recruiting process is so broken, you can’t easily tell whether your job-hunting strategy is working or not.

When you fill out countless online job applications and hear nothing back from dozens of employers, you might wonder if there’s something wrong with your background.

Or, you might conclude that nobody hears anything back from employers after completing online job applications and figure that you just need to keep filling out applications until finally, somebody responds.

There’s nothing wrong with your background, but you can’t keep lobbing applications into the void and hoping that an employer will finally give you a chance.Filling out online job applications is the least effective way to get a job.

Here are five job-search tactics that work  and five that don’t.

Five Job-Search Tactics That Work:

1. Networking:

Networking is a fantastic job-search channel, but it doesn’t work quickly. You cannot view networking as a transaction, where you tell a friend “I’m job-hunting!” and they say “Great, I know someone who can hire you!”

Networking takes time and patience, and you have to be willing to give back as much or more as you get out of each networking relationship. You have to be ready to help your friends think through their problems when you meet with them. Everybody needs moral support, advice and introductions  not just folks who are job-hunting.

2. Consulting:

Getting your own consulting business card and networking your way into small consulting jobs is a fantastic job search approach, because it not only opens doors for you but also grows your muscles, confidence and income at the same time.

3. The Direct Approach:

The direct approach to hiring managers with your Pain Letters and Human-Voiced Resume is a powerful job search channel.

It takes more time and effort than typing answers into an online application form. You have to conduct research to write a good Pain Letter, and that is why so few people do it. That’s good for you if you take the plunge!

4. Recruiters:

Recruiters are a great job search channel if you have a recruiter-friendly resume. Your first step is to update your LinkedIn profile. Then, sign up to have recruiters contact you if they’re interested in talking with you about one of their open positions.

5. Temp-to-Perm:

Temp-to-perm means taking temp jobs to give you an income and a chance at full-time opportunities in your client firms as they learn how smart and capable you are.

If you take this approach, remember that an organization who uses your services as a temp cannot hire you as a full-time employee for free. It will cost them a search fee to change you from temporary to full-time status. Some employers will happily do it, and others will balk.

Five Job-Search Tactics That Don’t Work:

1. Online job applications:

Completing online job applications may be the worst way to get a job because when you fill out an online job application, you feel like you’ve really accomplished something  but have you?

Most online job applications never get seen  by human eyes.

2. Resume blasting:

You can pay a service to blast out your resume to hundreds of employers, but why would those employers want to receive your unsolicited resume out of the blue?

Their problem is not that they don’t receive enough resumes!

You can blast your own resume to many companies and some job-seekers do, but this is not your best job-search approach.

3. Job Fairs (with exceptions):

Job fairs used to be a great way to get hired and, of course, to hire people. I hired scores of people through job fairs, but these days many recruiters who attend job fairs merely sit at their company‘s booth and don’t talk to candidates.

What’s great about job fairs from a recruiter’s perspective is that you can talk to a lot of people quickly and determine whether it makes sense to invite them back to the company’s facility for a longer conversation. If those mini-interviews are not happening at the job fair, what is the point of it?

Some recruiters attend job fairs but tell applicants “Check out our open positions on our company’s website.”

Why would a job applicant pay to dry-clean your business attire and pay for gas and parking to stand in a long snaking line of people just to be told “We’re not taking resumes today.”?

Some job fairs buck the trend and are very active and useful. In my experience, they are typically highly specialized job fairs for people in one function and/or industry.

4. Calling or emailing HR:

Some job-seekers make a habit of calling an employer’s HR department over and over or emailing them to say “Are you interested in my background?”

Those folks are deluged with calls and email messages. They cannot respond to all of them, and even if you reach someone live on the phone they’re not likely to say “Oh yes! I remember your resume.”

The days when that might have happened are long gone.

5. Waiting for employers to find you:

With the rise of social media some folks have taken to growing their blog or podcast audience in hopes of getting employers to notice them as emerging thought leaders and hire them. This a tough road to follow! Everybody is information-overloaded these days.

Even if someone from one of your target companies happened to find your blog or podcast, it doesn’t follow that they will contact you and say “I want to interview you!”

It’s much more likely that if they did contact you, they would want to interview you for the company newsletter or have you come and speak on a panel in exchange for a free lunch.

You have to be more purposeful and pointed in your job search intentions than growing a social media presence just to get employers’ attention!

Invest your precious time and energy on the most effective job search tactics, and leave the rest behind!

The 10-Step Plan for Career Change !!

How does it happen? Perhaps you just begin to lose interest. Perhaps you find something that interests you more. Perhaps your company is downsizing. These are just some of the numerous reasons people find themselves on that precipitous cliff looking back on their career just as the dirt begins to crumble beneath them.

Are you facing that career change plunge? Do you wish you were? Take it slowly and make sure what you really want to do is change careers. Then use this 10-step plan, and you will be on much more sure footing — and on a path toward career change success.

Finally, remember that career change is a natural life progression; most studies show that the average job-seeker will change careers (not jobs) several times over the course of his or her lifetime.

Step 1: Assessment of Likes and Dislikes:

A lot of people change careers because they dislike their job, their boss, their company. So, identifying the dislikes is often the easier part of this step; however, you will not know what direction to change your career unless you examine your likes. What do you really like doing when you’re at work, when you’re at home – in your spare time. What excites you and energizes you? What’s your passion? If you’re really unsure, consider taking one of more of these career assessments. The key is spending some time rediscovering yourself — and using your self-assessment to direct your new career search.

Step 2: Researching New Careers:

Once you’ve discovered (or rediscovered) your passion, spend some time researching the types of careers that center around your passions. Don’t worry if you’re feeling a bit unsure or insecure — it’s a natural part of the career change process. How much research you do also partly depends on how much of a change you’re making.

Step 3: Transferable Skills:

Leverage some of your current skills and experiences to your new career. There are many skills (such as communications, leadership, planning, and others) that are transferable and applicable to what you want to do in your new career. You may be surprised to see that you already have a solid amount of experience for your new career.

Step 4: Training and Education:

You may find it necessary to update your skills and broaden your knowledge. Take it slowly. If the skill you need to learn is one you could use in your current job, see if your current employer would be willing to pick up the tab. And start slowly. Take a course or two to ensure you really like the subject matter. If you are going for a new degree or certification, make sure you check the accreditation of the school, and get some information about placement successes.

Step 5: Networking: 

One of the real keys to successfully changing careers will be your networking abilities. People in your network may be able to give you job leads, offer you advice and information about a particular company or industry, and introduce you to others so that you can expand your network. Even if you don’t think you already have a network, you probably do – consider colleagues, friends, and family members. You can broaden your network through joining professional organizations in your new field and contacting alumni from your college who are working in the field you want to enter. A key tool of networking is conducting informational interviews.

Step 6: Gaining Experience:

Remember that, in a sense, you are starting your career again from square one. Obtaining a part-time job or volunteering in your new career field not only can solidify your decision, but give you much needed experience in your new career. You might also want to consider temping in your new field. Work weekends, nights, whatever it takes to gain the experience.

Step 7: Find a Mentor:

Changing careers is a major life decision that can get overwhelming at times. Find a mentor who can help you through the rough patches. Your mentor may also be able to help you by taking advantage of his or her network. A mentor doesn’t have to be a highly placed individual, though the more powerful the mentor, the more success you may have in using that power to your advantage.

Step 8: Changing In or Out:

Some people change careers, but never change employers. Unfortunately, only the very progressive employers recognize that once happy employees can be happy and productive again – in a different capacity. It’s more than likely that you will need to switch employers to change fields, but don’t overlook your current employer. Remember not to start asking about a job switch until you are completely ready to do so.

Step 9: Job-Hunting Basics:

If it’s been a while since you’ve had to use your job-hunting tools and skills, now is the time for a refresher course. Consider spending some time with one or more of our tutorials.

Step 10: Be Flexible: 

You’ll need to be flexible about nearly everything – from your employment status to relocation and salary. Set positive goals for yourself, but expect setbacks and change – and don’t let these things get you down. Besides totally new careers, you might also consider a lateral move that could serve as a springboard for a bigger career change. You might also consider starting your own business or consulting as other avenues.