10 Easy Skills to Pick Up Before Applying to a Job

So you’re writing your new resume, and suddenly you get to the “skills” section. You pause. Wait! What skills do I actually have?  

If you can answer that question with a slew of marketable skills, congratulations! If you have to take a bit of time to answer it, you’re not alone. Developing a slew of marketable skills takes time, and in addition, the skills you choose to highlight may be different based on the jobs you’re applying for. 

Here are a few easily learn able skills that you can use to bulk up your resume(and a few skills mixed in there that won’t necessarily help your resume, but are good to have in general for your job and for life).  Start practicing! 

Public speaking

Effective communication in front of others isn’t just useful for an interview – you’ll also use it every day you’re on the job. You can find tutorials online, everywhere from the Stanford Graduate School of Business to public speaking experts on how to communicate your ideas to an audience – not to mention the guidance and inspiration that TED talks can provide. 

HTML coding

So, this is one of the more time intensive skills to “pick up” on this list. But if you’re new to coding, don’t write it off – learning how to write (or even just recognize!) few basic, useful commands in HTML is a whole different ballpark than trying to teach yourself C++. Websites like Codeacademy offer to teach the basics of HTML in just a few hours of lessons. It’s well worth two afternoons of your time. 

Negotiation

Negotiation is a delicate art that requires a confluence of other soft skills, such as communication, listening, and innovation. You’ll use negotiation during the job application process, when you angle for a better salary or stock options offer. Negotiation will also come in handy when you’re pushing for a raise. Make sure to practice these five soft skills in order to perfect your negotiation prowess. 

PowerPoint

The natural corollary to public speaking skills? PowerPoint. (Or Google Slides, or Prezi, or whatever else you choose to make your presentations). Knowing how to create and present good PowerPoints is a must-have skill for more jobs than you would think. There is a multitude of tutorials and examples online that you can use as a jumping off point. And again, TED talks often have some of the best examples. 

Confidence

Confidence isn’t just something that some people were born with, and others weren’t. It is a skill that can be practiced, refined, and embodied into your daily lifestyle. Amy Gallo writes in the Harvard Business Review to remember to “be honest with yourself about what you know and what you need to learn,” as well as “practice doing the things you are unsure about” and “embrace new opportunities to prove you can do difficult things,” all as simple methods to boost confidence. 

Microsoft Excel

Excel is a powerful tool, and you could spend years learning all of the ins and outs of what you can do with it. Luckily, you usually don’t need to know all the nitty-gritty details of Excel to be able to use it effectively. There are variety of free and paid options to make you into a confident Excel user within just a few hours, or a few days, depending on how much time you can put into it. 

Task management

The ability to manage your time and prioritize your tasks is one of the most widely cited skills of highly productive people. There are so easy methods you can learn to help from this, from waking up a bit earlier to starting the day with your most difficult tasks. If that’s even too much for you, check out the scores of time management apps on the market that can help you use your time more effectively.  

Stress reduction

While stress reduction is not exactly something you can put at the top of the “skills” section of your resume, it’s arguably one of the most important skills you can have on the job— regardless of where you work and what your title is. One method that people are increasingly turning towards to reduce stress in the workplace is meditation. “The busier we are, the more we need that centering time—that time to actually be able to connect to our inner wisdom,” says Arianna Huffington, founder of the Huffington Post and advocate of daily meditation. Apps like Headspace or Insight Timer, or locally offered meditation and stress-reduction classes, can all help you find that “centering time” in your next job. 

Handshaking

Believe it or not, a handshake can speak volumes about a person. Your clammy, dead fish grip might be giving recruiters the wrong impression. Practice turning your limp handshake into a powerful grip, with locked eyes and a smile. Ask your friends, ask your family, ask people on the street to give you feedback on your handshake – this couldn’t be an easier skill to practice. 

Brainstorming

It’s not just at start-ups where ideas are shot rapid-fire around a table and onto a whiteboard (although if you’re applying to a start-up, it’s also a great skill to have).  In pretty much any job you ever have, you’re going to have to think collaboratively with other people. Practice with friends or with family to brainstorm any random topic, and see what you learn from it. 

Source: http://bit.ly/2zaXVe9

What you must do to get a job !!

Gone are the days, where one used to stay in the same organisation for years together. Employees change jobs regularly depending on greener pastures available elsewhere. Therefore, organisations have also started taking interviews seriously in the hope of landing skilled and stable employees who can prove to be valuable asset in the long run.

More and more people analytics is being used to help organisations identify the right person for the right jobs. In order to ensure that you crack interviews in 2017, here are a few skills that you can use:

1. Build the right resume: The primary objective to a resume is to get you to the next stage i.e. the interview process. It should be properly structured with primary objective in mind. To move ahead from other resume’s one might want to add additional sections like: Objectives/ Long Terms Goals/ How I can add value/ Achievements etc. Get creative so that your profile stands out from all the others out.

2. Prepare in advance: The interview needs preparation which very few people understand. Very few times, do we come across employers who do their homework before taking the interview. Generally, they start with “tell me something about yourself” while they quickly skim through your resume hunting for their next question. This is the question that you should prepare for and rehearse before you go for the interview. Take time and prepare an interesting and engaging response which will tilt the balance in your favor from the start!

3. Research the company and the person: This is, by far, the most important step that you should carry out before you venture out to present yourself. Go through the company website to look at the organisationculture and products. Look whether they are financially sound. It is also important to see whether you can find out something about the person who will interview you.

4. Be tech savvy: Computer skills are becoming more and more important with each passing day. Your target should be to become an expert with using technology to your advantage. Brush up your MS office Skills and for people in marketing, learn about digital marketing. You can showcase these in your resume and Interview which will again help you stand out.

5. Clean up your social media accounts: Many people now-a-days are stalked by the HR department on social media. Be careful at all times what you post and what it conveys. Keep all your accounts clean of any objectionable comments.

6. Lead the interview: You might not know it but there is always a way to lead the interview. Answer questions in such a way so that the interviewer is curious to ask the next question on the same subject. There are times when you might be asked about your experience on some project or elaborate on your achievements. You can lead these questions to areas that you are most comfortable discussing. This way, you can put your best foot forward and impress the interviewer(s).

7. Ask insightful questions – Many interviewers give you an opportunity to ask questions at the end of the interview. You could do some preparation for this also. Ask insightful questions about the role and the organisation. Also, try to judge from their response whether they are favorable towards your candidature or against.
Lastly, always be well dressed, relaxed and confident. These characteristics show through and add to your personality.

Source: http://bit.ly/2z0xrcW

12 Things to Never Do During A Phone Interview

These days, phone interviews are an unavoidable part of the job interview process, and for good reason: They save everyone involved time and effort. But that doesn’t mean that phones require zero energy on the part of the candidate. Yes, you should spend more time preparing for an in-person interview, but many companies treat phone screens as the official first round of the hiring process. That means candidates are expected to go into them prepared with as much information about the company, position, and their own skills and strengths as possible.

We asked HR pros about their top phone interview pet peeves, they had no shortage of advice to offer. Apparently, it’s quite easy to mess up your phone interview. But here’s the thing; it’s also not hard to come across well if you keep some key things in mind.

1. Never Take The Interview Somewhere Noisy

It might seem like common sense, but you’d be surprised what interviewers say they can hear in the background of their phone interviews—everything from barking dogs to screaming children. “Prepare for the interview by securing a quiet space in advance, even if it means escaping to your car parked in the garage,” advises Chere Taylor, founder of Fulcrum HR Consulting. “If you can lock your home office door, by all means do it. We’ve all been there and sometimes things just happen, but the more time spent anticipating what could go wrong, the better prepared and organized you will appear to the interviewer and the greater likelihood of success.” That doesn’t mean that if your washing machine beeps once in the background all hope is lost, but the more effort you put into being in a quiet place, the more focused you’ll be.

2. Don’t Talk About Your Personal Life

…Unless you’re directly asked a question about what you like to do in your off hours. “The point of a phone interview is to focus on getting to know a candidate’s  work experience and goals,” says Mckenzie Roark, campus talent specialist at Lithko Contracting. “A recruiter is trying to qualify them to see if they are the best fit for a role, and learning about their personal life doesn’t help. For example, when asked where you see yourself in five years, we don’t want to know that you hope to be married or that you want to buy a new house. That is nice but that isn’t relative to anything professional.”

3. Resist The Urge to Multitask

It might be tempting to cross something off your to-do list while on a phone interview, but recruiters and hiring managers can easily tell if your attention is elsewhere. “My number one pet peeve is people who decide to multitask while on the phone interview,” says Dan Krupansky, Talent Acquisition Manager at PrimePay. “I have heard candidates washing dishes, making lunch in the microwave, going for walks, letting their dog out, and grocery shopping during the interview. I even had one person use the bathroom and flush the toilet while speaking with me.” Needless to say, this doesn’t reflect well on your level of interest in the position you’re interviewing for.

4. Skip The Money Conversation

To put it bluntly, it’s simply too early in the process for you to be the one who brings up salary expectations. “Chances are if a candidate is participating in a phone interview, this is the first time they have talked with the company, and the first call isn’t the appropriate time to talk about ‘what’s in it for you,’” says Justina Strnad, the Talent Acquisition Manager for Shiftgig. “Trust me, if you are a great candidate and make it to next steps, the hiring team is going to be very transparent about what’s in it for you later on!”

5. Never Put Your Interviewer On Hold

Phone interviews don’t take that long, and there probably isn’t anything else going on that is really truly so urgent that you need to pause your interview. “Do not put me on hold to take an important call that just beeped in,” advises Jeremy Payne, head of people operations at Remote Year. “I am your important call. If you are expecting extremely urgent news (like information about a family illness), be sure to preface that in the early minutes of the interview, so the recruiter is aware of the situation and so you can work with them to reschedule if that interruption does occur,” he says.

6. Never Skip The Q&A

“After wrapping up a phone interview, it is typical that the interviewer will ask the candidate if they have any questions. I can’t stress this enough: ALWAYS ask questions,” says Roark. “If we have had a great phone interview and then we wrap up and they don’t have any questions for me, it pretty much ruins the whole interview. It tells me that the candidate is uninterested in the role, which in reality, might not be the case at all,” she notes. But surely, if you’re interested in a job, you can think of something to ask your interviewer.

7. Don’t Be Late

It seems basic, but surprisingly, a lot of people are late to phone interviews. “About a quarter of the people with whom I schedule phone interviews aren’t on time,” says Sophie Cikovsky, who handles U.S. recruiting for Infinite Global. “While this bothers me personally, it’s also indicative of someone who isn’t very detail-oriented,” she explains. “In order to identify this early in the hiring process, I started asking all candidates a few years ago to call me as opposed to calling them at an agreed upon time. That way if I hear from them at 1:13pm or 12:49pm instead of our planned 1:00 pm interview time, I have an early indicator that they might not be a great fit.”

8. Don’t Assume Reception Is Good

“Make sure you test your headset and connection before dialing in,” recommends Payne. “There is nothing more frustrating for a recruiter who has a structured interview guide in place having to repeatedly ask the same question over and over because they could not understand your answer due to static or dropped signals.” Test call a friend beforehand or even call yourself from a landline if necessary; it will take less than a minute.

9. Never Talk Over The Interviewer

You might be eager to get your point across or talk about your experience, but interrupting the interviewer is awkward and rude when you’re speaking on the phone, even more so than in face-to-face interviews. “Interviewing can be stressful and sometimes that stress manifests itself in speaking too fast, speaking too loud, talking over the interviewer, or attempting to answer the interviewer’s question before they have actually finished asking the question,” says Taylor. “Don’t do this.” There’s a big difference between being assertive and being aggressive, and interviewers can always recognize it.

10. Skip Filler Words

It’s tough not to say things like “um,” “uh,” and “like” in everyday speech, but these verbal habits become much more pronounced when speaking on the phone, says Chris Dardis, a recruiting expert and HR professional with Versique Executive Search. “In face-to-face interviews, they’re not as noticeable because there are other things like your hair, suit, or body language to distract people,” he explains. But in a phone interview, the only thing you have to go on is what you say and how you say it. “That’s why it’s so important to eliminate these words from your speech when doing a phone interview.”

11. Don’t Go In Blind

Not knowing anything about the company or job you’re interviewing for is way more obvious than you’d think. “Many people think that a phone interview means they’re getting away with something, that they don’t have to put as much effort into researching the role or company,” says Steve Pritchard, HR Consultant for giffgaff. And if you have your laptop in front of you during the interview to do a few quick searches, they won’t know the difference, right? Not exactly. “Seasoned interviewers will know whether an interviewee is researching while on the phone; they will take too long to answer the question and punctuate their answers with a lot of ‘ums’ and ‘errs’ as they type. The interviewer can often even hear the typing as they ask the question,” he adds.

12. Nix Long-Winded Answers

“The key to success during a phone interview is clear and concise answers,” says Dardis. “People’s attention spans tend to be shorter over the phone. You don’t want your future employer to lose interest in the conversation.” He recommends practicing answers to questions you know will be asked ahead of time in order to be clear on what you’re going to say. That way, you can prevent rambling before it starts.

Source: http://bit.ly/2gCaCrs

6 tips to dress professionally for an interview

Tips for job interview

 

When you go for a job interview, you make your first contact with your potential employer and it’s always best for you to give them a great first impression. Here are some tips that you can use to look professional and confident when you go for your interview.

Feel comfortable

You should wear your attire that you are comfortable with. This will prevent you from twitching on your seat that makes you and your interviewee look uncomfortable. So wear something lose that let you feel light.

Limit Jewelry

Not just women, but even men should limit wearing swaying earrings, loud bracelets and other unnecessary accessories that might cause distraction. Flashy jewelry will also be a distraction for the recruiter to keep eye contact with you

Don’t overuse perfume.

It’s good to smell fresh and attractive. But don’t over use perfumes or deodorant which will let you be that unwanted standout person in the room. The recruiters shouldn’t remember you for having that distinct smell.

Hide your piercings and tattoos

Tattoos and piercing are the latest trend among young adults. However, it doesn’t show a professional character when you apply for a job. It is better if you have any markings covered and made invisible to your employer.

Have a back up

It’s always good to have a backup shirt just in case you happen to get some dirt, sauce or some stain while you are on your way to your interview. Even if you plan not to take the public transport or not to have a meal before your interview, you might still be prone to have an accident because of someone else.  You don’t want to be in those commercials!

Look good, feel great

Have a shower, comb your hair, and look as if you are going on a date with a celebrity. You shouldn’t always rely on deos to cover up your smell. Also don’t forget to have some mints before you walk in.

Ask if you are not sure

If you are not sure what you should wear for your interview, don’t be afraid to ask your employer. It doesn’t give out any negative impression about you and you don’t end up having a dilemma on what you should be wearing that morning for your interview.

What to do after Job Interview?

What to do after Job Interview

 So, the job interview is over

Did your interview go well or not, the worst thing you can do is nothing at all. It’s always important to be prepared for any possible outcome – and do the most you can to boost your chances. To help turn your potential post-interview stress into a positive attitude that could help land your dream job, here are some of our top tips on what to do after a job interview:

Follow up, but don’t be impatient

Do follow-up with a telephone call to the employer within a week to ten days (or sooner, if the employer had a shorter timetable) to ask about the position. And do continue to build rapport and sell your strengths during the phone call.

Take notes on what worked, and what didn’t work.

A great interview might tempt you to put your job search on a shelf and move on with your personal life. You should have some time to write down what did, or did not, go well in your interview. Evaluating yourself after an interview — even a great one — can help you learn more about your own strengths and weaknesses.

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Things to Stop Doing in Interviews

things to stop doing in interviews
10 Things To Stop Doing in interviews

Landing in an Interview is just a start that you have impressed the HR manager and interviewer by writing a perfect resume. You must be aware of what you are doing in your job interview.  Unfortunately, a lot of talented candidates get to their eye to eye interview and completely blow their chances through one or many mistakes that gives the interviewer the wrong impression. Following are the things to stop doing in interviews

#1 How will you feel if the recruiter hadn’t bother going through your resume? Same way don’t go without any knowledge about the company. Visit the Company’s website and go through their about us tab, it will help you to tackle the interview with confidence.

#2 Don’t show up late on your interview,

be on time, and if some situation arises, inform your interviewer about being late. Interviewer had blocked his time for you, so you should respect that.

#3 Don’t fiddle with your mobile, it will give a bad impression that you are avoiding the interview. Best thing is to switch off your mobile before entering main entrance of building.

#4 Don’t go with a bad attitude, you can have a terrible day in train or bus, taking that vibes with you in an interview will give the employer an idea that you are more concerned to everything in the world except your job.

#5 Don’t over-rehearse. Company’s hire people and not robots. Give genuine answers to the employer questions also don’t be too comfortable or familiar that  the employer feels awkward about that.

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Skills To Be An Ideal Job Candidate

Skills To Be An Ideal Job Candidate

When hiring, companies are 100 per cent sure about what they want. However, unfortunately job seekers are often not sure about what they want, and that stops them from effectively communicating that they might be the best candidate for the job.

Potential

Companies are always on the lookout for long term potential to support their brand.
They want motivated personnel who’re excited about their role in the company and the company’s future.

Creativity

Businesses often run in a set pattern. However, when the tide turns you know who’s been swimming naked. A company knows every time economy changes or the competition introduces a new product/service, the company strategy has to change accordingly. In such cases they need creative people with unique problem solving skills to step in a tweak ongoing processes. Show them how you tackle challenges and opportunities, and they will ask you to come onboard.

Ability to Adjust

Most of us spend a LOT of time at work, and while you may get to choose your friends, you don’t have that option with colleagues.  However, in a workplace there are unwritten rules of being understanding, respectful and reliable.

Ability to add Value

Employers want people who’ll add value to the organization and make money for them. If you’re not able to convince them your skills would help them make money, why should they hire you! After all, a business is not the same as charity. The key here is to quantify your work. Make sure they see value in you.

Brilliant CV

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11 Things You Should Never Put On Your Resume

11 Things You Should Never Put On Your Resume

Irrelevant work experiences

Yes, you might’ve been the “king of making milkshakes” at the restaurant you worked for in high school.
But, unless you’re planning on redeeming that title, it’s time to get rid of all that clutter.

Personal stuff

Don’t include your marital status, religious preference, or social security number. This might have been the standard in the past, but all of this information is now illegal for your employer to ask you, so there’s no need to include it.

Your hobbies

Nobody cares. If it’s not relevant to the job you’re applying for, then it’s a waste of space and a waste of the company’s time.

References

If your employers want to speak to your references, they’ll ask you. Also, it’s better if you have a chance to tell your references ahead of time that a future employer might be calling. If you write, “references upon request” at the bottom of your resume, you’re merely wasting a valuable line.

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Five Questions Every New Employee Should Ask

questions-new-employee-should-ask

Every organization demands certain attributes or skills to achieve success. An insight into those on the very first day can give you a head start in a new job.

History of the Role

It’s most important to know that whether the position you have been hired for is ‘new’ or a ‘replacement’. If the role is new, then one should be able to check the proper route map of one’s growth and if it’s the replacement then one should know the exact reason for the same. These two questions will support you to estimate the elevation of your career graph.

Expectations from You 

Most organizations fail to spell out clear expectations with time frame. Ask for it in writing, ask questions on the same, and seek clarity before going about achieving it. It’s important that one should have an understanding of the management’s expectations.

Understand the Vision of Co

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Ten Most Common Interview Questions

interview questions

Tell me about yourself

This means: “Give me a broad overview of who you are, professionally speaking, before we dive into specifics.” You should prepare about a one-minute answer that summarizes where you are in your career and what you’re especially good at, with an emphasis on your most recent job. Keep your personal life out of it; your interviewer isn’t asking to hear about your family, hobbies or where you grew up.

What interests you about this job?

Focus on the substance of the role and how it interests you. Don’t talk about benefits, salary, the short commute or anything else unrelated to the day-to-day work you’d be doing, or you’ll signal that you’re not particularly enthusiastic about the work itself. Interviewers want to hire people who have carefully considered whether this is a job they’d be glad to do every day, and that means focusing on the work itself – not what the job can do for you.

Why did you leave your last job?

Don’t discuss conflicts with your manager or co-workers, complain about your work or badmouth employers. Job seekers are commonly advised to say they’re seeking new challenges, but that only works if you’re specific about those new challenges and how this job will provide them in a way your last job didn’t. It’s also fine to cite things like a recent or planned move, financial instability at your organization or other reasons that are true.

Why would you excel at this job?

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