The 5 “Must Knows” of Job Interview Preparation

You’ve impressed an employer with your resume and they called you to schedule an interview. You’re ecstatic. Now, it’s time to get over the ecstasy and start preparing for the interview.

How do you prepare properly? Follow these five “must knows” of interview preparation:

Know Yourself. You got the interview, so you must have already communicated much of this in your resume and cover letter. Now, think about how you’ll describe yourself. What truly sets you apart from other candidates? What’s your “personal brand”? What are the strengths you bring to the job? Also, be prepared to answer typical and atypical interview questions. What are your career goals? Why do you want to leave your current employer? How can this job help you accomplish your career goals?

Know Your Resume. The interviewer has painted a mental picture of you by reading your resume and cover letter. Be sure you have a copy to refer to as you prepare for the interview. Since your resume should be targeted at the job description, you need to look for the parts they might ask questions about. For instance, you may have written about an accomplishment from a previous job that is not fresh in your mind but is critical to the position you’re seeking. So, jog your memory for some details that you can cite during the interview. CareerBuilder.com recently asked about 3,000 hiring managers about interview blunders by job candidates, and 30% said “not offering specific answers to interview questions” was a common and detrimental gaffe.

Know the Company. Go into an interview without having researched the employer and your candidacy may well be dead before your seat turns warm. With all the information available on the web, and the rise in importance of networking, you have no excuse for not knowing important data about the company before you walk into the interview. Fortunately, we’re getting better at this, according to a recent Accountemps survey of senior executives with the nation’s largest companies. The survey found that about four of every five executives (79%, to be exact) said candidates either somewhat or very frequently demonstrate knowledge of companies during interviews. That’s up from 59% in 1997.

Know What You Want to Ask. Close to half (48%) of the CareerBuilder survey base named “appearing disinterested” as a common interview faux pas among candidates. To demonstrate your interest, prepare two lists: questions whose answers you need to know and another of what you want to know. Which questions go where? That depends on what you feel is crucial to deciding whether you might want to take the job if it’s offered.

Know Your Interviewers. If the hiring manager or would-be boss is interviewing you, get to know about them, namely, their managerial styles, how they might react in a hypothetical scenario, such as a pressing project deadline or an unexpected drop in revenue. If you know the names and roles of your interviewers ahead of time, find out about them through their bios on the company web site (if they’re available) or through a web search. Gain a sense of what it would be like working for and with these people.

Source: http://bit.ly/2C7Dlxi

Why These 3 Annoying Cover Letter Blunders Make Recruiters Cringe

With unemployment at an all-time low, many employers are complaining they’re struggling to find the talent they need. Meanwhile, millions of job seekers are frustrated by the lack of responses they’re getting from applying to jobs online. Especially when they take the extra time to write a cover letter.

Recruiters Say Most Cover Letters Stink

One of the most common things recruiters say when it comes to cover letters is, “You’ve seen one, you’ve seen them all.” That’s because the majority of job seekers copy free templates off the internet. And sadly, these templates are pretty outdated. Given how many applicants recruiters have to go through to find candidates (the average is 100-plus applicants per position), they quickly become adept at skimming cover letters to determine if the applicant has sent them a dud. If they see one or more things that indicate the candidate’s cover letter is just like every other one, they’ll throw it in the trash. Having worked with thousands of recruiters, I can tell you, the following are the three worst things you can do in your cover letter.

1. “To whom it may concern.

Nothing screams “I’m out of touch” more than addressing the cover letter with this phrase. While you may not know the hiring manager or recruiter’s name, you can at least write “Dear hiring team” to make it a bit more personal.

2. “I’m a [insert bragging here].

If you met the recruiter face to face, you wouldn’t launch into a long monologue about how talented you are. That would be weird. And yet, people suddenly go into over-the-top self-promotion mode when they write a cover letter. The cover letter shouldn’t be about how amazing you think you are. Instead, it should focus on how you know the employer is exceptional at what it does. It’s your job to show the company you understand what it’s all about, and by default, would fit in with their corporate culture.

3. “If you look at my résumé you’ll see, blah, blah, blah.”

There is zero need to recap your resume in the cover letter. The recruiter is capable of looking over your skills and experience. Repeating yourself in the cover letter is a big waste of the recruiter’s time–something they don’t appreciate.

Want your cover letter to stand out and get recruiters to call you? Then you need to share something attention-grabbing. A strong opening line that generates curiosity, such as,

“I remember the first time I learned the importance of your product,” followed up by a powerful personal story that ties you to the employer’s mission is the best way to showcase you’re a match for their corporate culture. This is referred to as the disruptive cover letter technique, and it provides recruiters with refreshingly original content that makes them want to speak to the candidate who wrote it.

Don’t turn recruiters off with a boring, just-like-all-the-others cover letter. Instead, focus on creating something that engages the hearts and minds of recruiters–ultimately, motivating them to want to talk to the talented person who was wise enough to write something that’s both relevant and unique.

Source: http://on.inc.com/2fRwFd3

7 Skills To Master To Land a Dream IT Job

7 Skills To Master To Land a Dream IT Job

User Experience Design

Internet growth rate is on its all-time high in India. The rapid increase in the internet user base has surged the use of computer languages. Programmes such as HTML, JavaScript and CSS are similar to any common languages today. These computer languages were utilized in a specific sector once to develop and program things, however, they have found ways to numerous non-IT sectors too. These languages thus make an important addition in your CV.

Mobile App Developments

The technology is stepping into every sphere rapidly and with time experts have discovered ways to make it smart and easily usable. The increasing mobility has surged the number of mobile devices and also new technologies being used in the same. Application developers are benefitted from this surge. There is a huge demand for mobile app developers in the IT sector as every technology is turning mobile. Mobile application development enables the developers to present their ideas on different possible platforms.

Ruby on Rails

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