6 Impressive Skills to Include on Your Resume

In a job market where recruiters review an average of up to 250 applications per job listing, you need to submit a resume that stands out. But where do you even start?

Since you already know which skills to leave off your resume, and you’ve studied which trends to try and which to ignore, it’s time to talk about what should be on your resume. Here are three experts’ takes on the seven skills that will have recruiters excited to see your resume come into their queue.

Hard Skills

Whether you’re a high-tech data scientist or a high-performing elementary school teacher, here’s a selection of hard skills that can make you stand out from the competition.

1. Data Collection and Analysis

Increased technology usage in the workplace means there’s more data than ever to collect, track and analyze. That’s why data analysis is such a huge growth area, says Matt Sigelman, the CEO of Burning Glass Technologies, in Time: “Mainstream American companies have come to realize that in order to become more effective in the marketplace, they need to analyze data,” explains Sigelman. “And we’re seeing those skills showing up at a premium in a variety of industries, including marketing, logistics jobs and operations management jobs.”

How to Highlight: Reflect on the opportunities you’ve had to capture and analyze data in your current job and include them on your resume. If you can’t think of any, consider taking a free online course in data analytics from a website like edX or Coursera, then apply what you learn on the job.

2. Social Media

Social media makes a timely addition to any resume, says career coach Bethany Wallace: “Regardless of career field and job role, possessing social media management skills is a plus for any candidate,” she remarks. “Many companies still resist hiring a social media manager, and the ability to fill that gap might make the difference in a candidate’s standing.”

How to Highlight: If you completed coursework or an internship that involved social media, include it on your resume — extra points for sharing specifics on a campaign you executed. Don’t list recreational social media on your resume — limit this to times that you’ve managed social media accounts in a professional capacity.

3. Content Management Systems

Website building and design aren’t just for coders anymore. Easy-to-learn platforms like WordPress, Blogger, Squarespace and more can help you learn the basics of creating and maintaining a blog or website. “WordPress is the most popular CMS (content management system) in the world. Tons of sites, big and small, use it to power their businesses,” says Laurence Bradford, creator of Learn to Code With Me, on Forbes. “WordPress is helpful to know in a range of careers from web development to writing.”

How to Highlight: Learn how to use these platforms through one of the many available online classes or tutorials, then list it under the skill section of your resume. If you want to go the extra mile, build a personal website or online portfolio and include a link to it so recruiters and hiring managers can see your skills for themselves.

Soft Skills

Even in a technical age, it’s not all about technical skills. In fact, in a report compiled by the International Association of Administrative Professionals, OfficeTeam and HR.com, 67 percent of HR managers said they’d hire a candidate with strong soft skills even if that person’s technical skills were lacking.

While you can’t rely on being hired for a job based on soft skills alone, such a strong majority opinion among hiring managers is more than enough incentive to bring a focus to soft skills on your resume and in your interview process. Just don’t list them out point-blank — that’s an amateur (and unconvincing) way to do it. Instead, let your resume bullet points demonstrate how you’ve leveraged these skills.

1. Communication

Communication consistently ranks among the most important skills for a candidate to have — and that includes both verbal and written. “According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, 73.4% of employers want a candidate with strong written communication skills,” says Kaleigh Moore, contributing writer for Inc.

How to Highlight: Edit your resume for grammar and spelling, but also for clarity. Rewrite long sentences to be shorter, then read your resume out loud to make sure all of your thoughts make sense. Prove your communication skills by email and phone by being brief and to-the-point — yet warm — whenever you interact with the recruiter.

2. Problem-Solving

“Employees themselves are hopefully ‘solved problems,’ fulfilling their job duties and more,” writes Jessica Amidon on the AthLife blog, a career development resource for post-professional, professional and collegiate athletes. “An employee that is able to present creative solutions to complex problems creates tremendous value for the employer and makes himself indispensable.”

How to Highlight: Most resume bullet points should focus on the solution to a problem, such as “Increased email open rates 10 percent.” Whenever possible, articulate the problem as well as the solution so that recruiters can see exactly how you’ve applied your problem-solving skills.

3. Positive Attitude

It’s not hard to understand why employers value this skill so highly — it can help in nearly every situation you encounter in the workplace, from collaborating with others to identifying creative solutions. “Having a positive attitude is absolutely crucial if candidates want to stand out from their peers,” Wallace agrees.

How to Highlight: It’s easier to display a positive attitude in an interview than on a resume, but you can start by framing your on-the-job challenges in a positive way. Using verbs like “overcame,” “surmounted,” “succeeded” and “won” can contribute to an overall positive, energetic impression.

Whether you’re one of the millions of people looking for a job, or currently employed but considering your next move, list as many of these skills as you can to make your resume pop up in front of the recruiters.

Source: http://bit.ly/2zPiUjS

How to Spot a Bad Recruitment Agency

During the tough times of an economic downturn, when unemployment numbers skyrocket, job seekers need all the support and guidance they can get. Unfortunately, it is a fertile period for bad recruitment agencies to ply their unethical tricks. However, there are some indicators of bad recruiting practice which, when known, will help you spot and avoid unscrupulous recruitment agencies with poor performance standards.

Is There A Fee Involved?

If your recruitment agency attempts to charge you a fee for their recruiting services warning bells should sound immediately. Recruitment agency fees are paid by the company that hires you. You should never sign a contract in which you agree to pay the recruitment agency for something your new employer should be paying for, no matter how great their spiel about a “grand scale can’t fail personalized recruitment campaign” sounds.

Is Your Consultant Less Than Well Informed?

Then why are they a recruitment consultant? Recruitment is a high pressure sector in which competition is fierce. If consultants don’t appear to be knowledgeable about a job sector or specific position they’re not doing their job properly, which can indicate that the recruitment agency has substandard training programmers or just plain poor standards when it comes to performance. If they’re not doing their best, you’re not getting the best opportunity to find employment.

Are They Easy With “Being Liberal with the Truth”?

Then what else will they be easy with? There are many stories on the internet and questions asked in forums about recruitment consultants who say it is fine to lie during an interview or on your CV about your personal or professional history. This basically makes you as unethical as the consultant. Stick to the truth and leave the consultant to come unstuck one day.

Have Your References Become Their New Business Leads?

This can be tricky to find out, but it is a good sign that a recruiter is more interested in generating large volumes of business leads than focussing on getting you into your desired job. Contact your referees after your recruitment agent has called them and ask if they put forth any other business propositions to them. If they did, think about getting a consultant with a little more focus on your requirements.

Are They Embarrassingly Overconfident?

The brash, in-your-face antics of some recruitment consultants can drive you mad. Being overconfident to the point that they guarantee you the job is a sure sign that much of their business approach is hot air. Nobody but the company making the hiring decisions can guarantee you the job. Again, look for consultants who are honest from the start. After all, they are your initial representation to what could be your next employer.

Does Your Consultant Apply Too Much Pressure Toward Certain Jobs?

The role of the recruitment consultant is to find you a position that meets as many of your career aspirations as possible. It is not the role of the recruitment consultant to steer you away from your career interests and toward open positions from which they know they will earn more commission. You should always feel that you share a solid relationship with your consultant and that they are working in your best interest at all times.

Have You Been Asked Too Many Information Gathering Questions?

It is important to be wary of consultants who ask you too many questions which provides them with detailed information about your past employers or companies you have approached regarding employment. This is simply thinly disguised lead generation your consultant will use for other candidates.

Believe it or not, some unscrupulous consultants will ask you to name the companies you have sent your CV to, so that they can avoid sending it again, which they claim may damage your chances. The consultant now has a list of companies currently recruiting, which they can send other candidates to, increasing your competition.

Remember That It’s Not All Bad Out There

If you follow the simple guidelines above and look out for the highlighted indicators of bad practice there is no reason why you won’t find a good and ethical recruitment agency, which in turn will help you to find the employment you seek. As a last point, always remember to ask around about a recruitment agency’s reputation, as they are often built on candidate experiences and word of mouth.

Source: http://bit.ly/2gICwy7

6 Steps for a Career Makeover..!!

Are you tired of feeling dragged down by your work and have you wanted to make a change but haven’t done anything about it? As years progress, career progression plateaus. You will need to keep improvising and constantly innovating your career strategy to keep growing.

Everyone deserves to have a job that makes them want to jump out of bed in the morning. It takes time and commitment to make this happen, but it is possible.

Your career graph has to keep constantly moving forward, to keep pace with the changing times around you. If you are in the same position, role, or even the city for a really long time, chances are you will be reductant over time. Either technology or someone young and smarter, will do your job for half the pay.

Every career has various infection points. Your first job, your first promotion, the first time you lead a team, a whole function, could be a few.

All of us need career makeovers at each of these infection points. This makeover will kick-start the trajectory at your next goal. The time of these makeovers and the infection points could be different for each one of us. However the makeover is something we all have to go through, to be ahead of the game.

Here are 6 steps for a career makeover:

1) Decide on the next stage:  

The first step is to decide on what is next. This sets the next destination, and all the time frame for reaching the goal. Make sure thisgoal is the next important thing for you.

2) Schedule and follow Schedule:

Almost all successful people in the world have a schedule. They have the schedule like white on rice. It is not list of “To do”, or a bucket list. Successful people are sticklers of a plan and schedule. Everything in their day has a time pre-booked. Make time for the things that will help reach your next IT, and do it in your most productive hours.

3) Invest in yourself:

Learn. Constant learning is the key to your success. Whatever you decide to do, keep learning. Get certified, work as an intern to gain experience. What it takes, Learn. The minute you feel you know a thing or two about something, learn the next big thing.

4) Meet people in your group:

In today’s connected world, it is a sin not to network. Connecting with like-minded people, will open up a world of possibilities. With a large network of people you can reach out for help. You will be able to get to your goals faster.

However, networking is NOT about asking the other person for help. It also means you will need to add value to the relationship and be willing to help. When you reach out to someone, make sure you find common ground and hold out the offer to help.

5) Talk about your plans:

Be willing to talk to every relevant person,seek feedback, and face rejections. These conversations will expand your horizon about your idea.

6) Overcome your fear, Visualize your future:

Finally, at the end of the day, when you are ready and convinced about your ideas or plans, be ready to overcome your fear of failure. Visualize how the future will be, and where you see the next step heading. Sometimes this is driven by data and at times, it is a leap of faith. Which is your path, take the plunge!

How To Use Google As Your Resume!!

If you’re job hunting, you may be thinking the first thing you need to do is put together your resumé. That used to be true before the Internet. But these days, the new resumé is called Google.

What an employer finds out about you simply by Googling your name helps determine whether you get hired. And you’ve got to clean up what the employer finds before the company or nonprofit finds it.

There are four things you can do about this to boost your chances of getting hired: you can edit, fill in, expand and add to your Google resumé. I’ll provide details shortly.

Why Employers Reject Job Hunters
Almost all (91%) of U.S. employers have visited a job-hunter’s profile on social networks and more than 69 percent of employers have rejected some applicants on the basis of what they found. Things that can get you rejected: bad grammar or gross misspelling on your Facebook or LinkedIn profile; anything indicating you lied on your resumé; any badmouthing of previous employers; any signs of racism, prejudice or screwy opinions about stuff; anything indicating alcohol or drug abuse and any — to put it delicately — inappropriate content.

Also on Forbes:

What is sometimes forgotten is that this works both ways.

Sometimes (68% of the time), an employer will offer someone a job because it liked what Google turned up about the person. Things like the creativity or professionalism you demonstrate online; your expressing yourself extremely well online; the employer’s overall impression of your personality online; the wide range of interests you exhibit online and evidence online that you get along well and communicate well with other people.

4 Ways to Improve Your Google Resume
So, now, here are my four tips for improving your Google resumé to help get hired:

1. Edit Your Google Resume
Make a list of adjectives you’d like employers to think of when they consider hiring you. Then Google yourself and see what the search engine pulls up. Also, go over any pages you’ve put up on social sites like Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest or YouTube and remove anything you posted there — or allowed others to post — that contradicts the impression you would like to make.

If you don’t know how to remove an item from a particular site, type or speak the following into a search engine like Google: “How to remove an item from [Facebook]” or whatever.

2. Fill In Your Google Resume
On sites like LinkedIn and Twitter, fill out your profile completely. Leave no part blank unless you have a very good reason. Most importantly, be sure to keep the profile up-to-date. There is nothing that makes you look less professional than having an obviously outdated profile.

Make your LinkedIn profile page really stand out when employers go browsing. Here are some hints on how to do it:

A photo is mandatory. Surveys have shown that not having your photo listed in your LinkedIn profile is a turnoff for most employers. The likelihood that your LinkedIn profile will get viewed increases 11 times if you include a photo. Make it a shot just of your head and shoulders, make it sharply focused and well lit, dress up for it and smile.

In the section called Job Title, if you aren’t searching for a career change and like what you’ve been doing but the title you have doesn’t contain the words a hiring manager would use to search for someone who does what you do, put in a slash mark and then add the title he or she would use. If you’re looking for a change, after listing your current job title, enter a slash and add the industry you want to find a job in so an employer’s search engine will pick you up.

In describing your past jobs or experience, don’t just make a list of tasks or achievements. LinkedIn gives you enough space to tell a story, so tell a story. Summarize some major achievement in that job and then tell a story of how you did it and what the measurable results were. List your skills: you increase the likelihood that your LinkedIn profile will be looked at by 13 times if you do.

In the Summary section, be sure to state whatever you think gives you a competitive advantage in your field.

Under Specialities, list every keyword you can think of that would lead a search engine to find you for the job you want.

Add links to any website you feel would help you stand out — for instance, your blog, if you have one and it’s solely devoted to your area of expertise and your Twitter account, if you’ve only been posting tweets that manifest your expertise in your field.

Join one or more LinkedIn groups related to your expertise. Post sparingly but regularly when the people in it are discussing something you’re an expert on. You want to get a name and reputation in your field.

3. Expand Your Google Resume
There are several ways to expand your presence on the Internet:

Forums: Professional sites like LinkedIn have forums, or groups, organized by subject matter. Look through the directory of those groups or forums, choose one or two related to your industry or interests and, after signing up, speak up regularly when you have something to say that will quietly demonstrate you are an expert in your chosen subject area.

Blogs: Start a blog if you don’t already have one, and update it regularly. If you don’t know how to blog, there are helpful sites like Blogger.com that give you detailed instructions. If you have a blog but it roams in terms of subject matter, start a new one that is more narrowly preoccupied with your particular area of expertis

Twitter: The advantage of Twitter is that it has hashtags and Google is indexing all those tags and tweets. Figure out which hashtags employers are likely to look for when they want to find someone with your expertise and experience.

4. Add to Your Google Resume
It will take any employer or HR department some time to sift through all the stuff about you that may appear when it does a Google search. You would help them by summarizing and organizing the pertinent information about yourself. You can do this by composing an old-type resumé and post it on the Internet (where Google will find it).

What Color Is Your Parachute: 2018 has detailed advice on the best way to craft a resumé. If you need additional guidance, search Google for the topic “keywords on an electronic resumé” or “examples of resumés” or “how to write a resumé.” This will turn up free resources and advice as well as professional resumé writers.

A final tip: Where you post your resumé makes all the difference in the world. If employers post their vacancy on a job board like Monster.com or CareerBuilder.com, they typically have to look through 219 resumeés from job hunters who respond before they find someone to interview and hire. If they post the vacancy on the employer’s website, they typically have to look through just 33.

However, if the job hunter takes the initiative to find a specific job rather than waiting to find a vacancy by, say, typing the name of that job into a search engine and then sending resumés to any companies whose name turns up, employers only have to look through 32 applications before finding someone to hire. If the job hunter takes even more initiative, chooses a company where he or she would like to work and gets a referral from an employee within that company, employers have to look through only 10 such candidates before finding someone to interview and hire.

Source: http://bit.ly/2zkDpFh

Competition Or Collaboration: Which Will Help Your Team Produce The Best Results?

It’s a question C-suite executives are asking with more frequency — perhaps because reported rivalries among White House staffers have them wondering about the most effective approach for their own leadership teams. Does encouraging rivalry result in everyone bringing their A-game?

When the executives I work with ask me this question, I answer by sharing a story from my own personal experience.

At one point in my career, I worked for an organization where the CEO created intense competition among the leadership team. He even hired two people to do the same job and didn’t tell them. His intention was to decide which one was best and to fire the other.

Did the tactic work?

Hardly. Instead it created a culture of back stabbing, in-fighting and resource hoarding. No one on the leadership team trusted each other. I watched talented people walk out the door, and then I did the same.

If you want to create a culture that will produce breakthrough results, collaboration trumps competition by a long shot. You want people to understand what their individual strengths are so they can pool those strengths and move toward a common vision.

Once collaboration is in place, people are much more trusting of each other, more willing to stretch themselves and more likely to create amazing results.

The opposite happens when competition starts showing up. People hoard systems, information and support staff. They’re less likely to share all kinds of resources — physical and intellectual. Those who see solutions for problems don’t share them until they can be sure they’ll get the credit. It’s impossible to get to the best ideas when people refuse to share and work through thinking together.

When competition is in play, people don’t trust each other enough to authentically create stretch goals that will enable everyone to grow beyond where they are now.

If you sincerely want a group of people to be high-performing together, you don’t want to create a culture of internal competition within the team.

That being said, I have seen other organizations who use healthy competition between teams to produce cutting-edge ideas. In these cases, two or three teams were charged with doing the exact same thing. They knew the other teams existed, but these teams didn’t share resources (budget, people or ideas) across the groups. Each team wanted to get to the end result on its own to be the winner.

This kind of competition between teams can create an intensity that generates powerful results for an organization. When you do this, you need to be transparent, and you want to clearly establish that they’re all working toward the same goal that will ultimately benefit the whole company and everyone in it. It’s also a good idea to let people know ahead of time that those teams will be shuffled up into new groups when the competition is over and then everyone will be expected to share best practices with each other.

Ultimately, you want to create a workplace culture where people freely share information, opinions and perspectives. The best way to achieve that is through building trust and emphasizing collaboration, not competition.

Source: http://bit.ly/2x1ASPH