5 CRITICAL INTERVIEW TIPS

Professional introduction

Every interviewer asks for an introduction. A candidate should be prepared with the best 4-5 liner summary starting with his present position and job role. You should give a very crisp summary of past roles, but don’t discount your education degrees and achievements in those roles.

Personal interests

All interviewers ask for personal details as well. This question is best answered by a brief about your immediate family and should have mention of your interest. Mention those hobbies where you have won some laurels to create an impression on the interviewer.

Industry knowledge

Every interviewer will want to check your on ground know how and understanding. Make sure you know the latest trend about your industry and company in particular. It helps to talk about them in a manner where you can highlight your achievements as well.

Timeliness

Being punctual will only win you good points. Arriving late and then justifying that with excuses will spoil your reputation even before an interaction.

Politeness

Common sense is becoming uncommon. Hence wishing the interviewer, saying things like – thank you, please, pardon me (when you haven’t understood a query well), if I may add (when stating a personal opinion), have a good day, it was a pleasure meeting you all – will reflect well on you.

Why Some People Get All The Good Job Offers

When working with job seekers, I often hear something like this, “I want to be more like my friend, ___. He’s always getting contacted about good job opportunities. His career has been one great position after another.” Then, they sigh and talk about how easy the person makes it look. Finally, they start to discount the person’s success with statements like, “He got a lucky break when he worked at ___.” Or, “He’s kind of intense when it comes to networking.” They say anything they can to make themselves feel better.

You can imagine their surprise when I say,

“Your friend isn’t lucky. He’s figured out the two most important activities needed to be in control of your career.”

We’ve all heard the saying, “Luck is where preparation meets opportunity.” It’s true, but most people don’t know how to translate that to actionable advice for their career. Until now…

If American Idol host, Ryan Seacrest can do it, so can you!

A great example of someone who has figured the two steps to a killer career strategy, is Ryan Seacrest. He has six jobs right now. He’s mastered the process I’m about to share with you. It’s not rocket science or brain surgery. All it takes is this:

Step 1: Know what your workplace personas are. Companies hire people who can solve problems and alleviate pains. After all, it’s costing them an average of 130-140% of your annual salary to employ you. Your workplace personas are how you like to create value for an employer. It’s the way in which you excel at saving and/or making them money – enough money to justify the cost of employing you. There are eight key personas in the workplace. All of us dominate in 2-3 of them. When we know our workplace personas, we can choose opportunities that leverage them. This is how people build successful track records. They use the skills they most enjoy to do the job. A total win-win.

Step 2: Consistently educate people about your workplace personas. Once you know your workplace personas and start to build a successful track record with them, the next step is to learn how to share your success with others in a way that doesn’t sound like bragging. Smart professionals know this is done via strategic networking. When you have meaningful conversations with people about problems you love to solve for your employer and discuss how you do it, you’re organically marketing your skills and abilities. The more you do this (i.e. answer questions for people, offer free advice and assistance, share how your company overcame similar challenges with your help, etc.), the stronger your professional reputation becomes. At which point, when people hear about jobs that are open and problems employers need solved, their interactions with you come to mind – and the phone calls and emails start coming in with those coveted job opportunities.

Want the best jobs? Act like a business-of-one.

The most successful small businesses build their reputations and market their services. They’re known for delivering results, which leads to an increase in referrals. You’re a business-of-one, which is the smallest type of small business. That means, you have to be even more vigilant about building your reputation and marketing your services – or suffer the consequences. Gone are the days where you could just keep your head down, do a good job, and stay with a company for 30 years. Today, you need to always be growing your skills AND letting people know about your growth. Otherwise, you will find yourself at the mercy of the job market.

Stop envying your peers and start doing what it takes to be the in-demand professional you long to be known as. Especially, now that you know how to prepare so opportunity can find you!

Source: http://bit.ly/2kv1N3N

Here are the list of mistake students make in their resume

Following is a list of common mistakes students make in their resumes. Have a look and see how many of these errors (if any) your current resume contains. You may correct them now or in subsequent chapters.

Tip

These mistakes have been identified and listed as per what is generally expected in a professional resume in the industry. There may be cases where you may have to follow the guidelines issued by your placement office or recruiting company which may be contradictory to what is written here. In such situations, you have no choice but to follow what is asked by them.

1. The resume file is not named properly:

Have you named your resume file as resume.doc or cv.doc or something similar? This is not only unprofessional but also makes it difficult for a recruiter to identify your resume once he downloads and saves your resume to a folder (Think what will happen if all the applicants’ resumes were named as resume.doc inside that folder).

Correct practice to name your resume is First Name Last Name – College Name.doc. For example, if you are Rahul Rana from IIT Madras, you can name your resume as Rahul Rana – IIT Madras.doc.

Also wherever possible, always send your resume in PDF format – looks very professional.

2. The resume runs into 2 pages or more :

While there is no set rule that your resume necessarily have to be within 1 page but more often than not students’ resumes run into multiple pages either because it contains too many irrelevant details or because the space has not been utilized efficiently. If your resume is more than 1.5 pages long, get your scissors ready. Remember, if Steve Jobs can mention what he did in one page, so can you!

3. Resume follows a 2 column structure :

At times, a few students make their resume in a 2 column structure. Please don’t. Stick to a one column structure as provided in sample resumes. Two column structures make the reading extremely difficult for a reader as it becomes difficult to decide which column one should focus on. Plus it is highly space in-efficient.

4. Your resume contains logo of your college :

There are a few colleges where Training & Placement cells make it compulsory that you put your college logo on top of your resume – in that case you cannot help it. But otherwise, or when applying off campus, you do not need to include the logo and make your resume unnecessarily bulky. Remember, your resume is your advertisement,not your colleges. If you have your college logo in your resume for no reason, delete it NOW.

5. Your resume contains your photograph :

Again, not required, if you have it in your current resume – please remove it. There is absolutely no need of a photo in a resume unless you are applying for a position where how you look matters such as aviation, hospitality, media,films, modeling etc. Else it is quite an outdated practice and unnecessary bulks up your resume file..

6. Your resume contains a very generic Career Objective statement :

If you have a Career Objective listed in your resume, does it read something like this?

“To experience the challenges of a working engineer in a healthy but competitive environment of industry, enabling to extract the best out of me which is conducive to learn and grow as professional, thereby directing my future endeavors as an asset to the organization”

These kind of copy pasted and generic statements serve no purpose other than making it clear to a recruiter that you have no idea of what you want from your career. You should either have a very specific objective statement outlining your interests or have none at all (yes that is OK). An example of a good Objective statement is given

below –

“4th year B.Tech Computer Science student at IIT Madras with excellent academic record and keen interest and practical exposure in the field of information security, especially web applications security.”

7. In your resume, things are not listed in reverse chronological order :

Look at your Academics, or Projects, or Internships, or Co/Extra Curricular section. Does it contain information in reverse chronological i.e. most recent first order? Yes, in each section, you should mention the most recent activity/achievement at the top and the least recent at the bottom. The reason being that employers are most interested in what you have been upto recently and you should make it easy for them to find out that information. If you have written it any other way in your resume in any section, please correct it now.

8. You have mentioned each year’s/semester’s GPA/% Marks in your Academics section :

Not required, just mentioning aggregate marks/CGPA is enough. For example, if you have completed six semesters of your B.Tech degree, you do not have to write each semester’s GPA; aggregate CGPA at the end of 6th semester is enough.

9. You have listed all the courses and labs that you have done till date :

Not required, strike that section off please. At best list 2-3 most relevant courses along with your grades in those courses (if grades were good). If an employer wants to know all the courses that you have done till date, he/she will most probably ask for an official transcript anyway.

10. You have included knowledge of Windows in your Technical Skills section :

Please don’t. It’s like saying you know English alphabets – it’s that common.

How Top Corporates Retain their Employees..!!



The likes of Vodafone are also considering letting their employees take a sabbatical to start up


There was a time when working in a top corporate meant the regular 9-5 job and stringent cultural rules, while restricting an employee’s creative freedom. This had even led to many corporate employees leaving their cushioned jobs to embrace the entrepreneurial world. But corporate today are waking up to the problem and addressing them by innovating and introducing new cultural changes. 

1) ‘Break to open your startup? We’ll consider that’ :

Talking about the consumerisation of rewards and how a corporate needs to monetize benefits for their employees, Sanchayan Paul, Head, Rewards and Organisation Effectiveness, Vodafone India said, “We listened to what our employees really wanted. 70 per cent of our new hire are millennials and 25 per cent of our employee base are women. Also, given the widespread of offices, our hiring too comes from Tier II and Tier III cities. We are not selling jobs anymore, we are selling careers.”

Understanding that many people leave jobs because of lack of flexible work timings or lack of leave options, Sanchayan said, “We have come up with different structures of working – one is where an employee can take a long break or a sabbatical without pay, another is where they choose flexible days in a week to work (instead of 5 days in a week they work for four days) and are paid accordingly and the third one is where they choose a flexible work timing and are paid according to their work hours.”

But the most interesting query is about employees wanting to be entrepreneurs. “We have had employees who want to open their startup but they want to come back if the venture fails. We are considering that option. In fact, we are working towards launching innovation labs and are hoping that these employees can work there,” he said.

2) Transparency at work:

Suchitra Rajendra, CHRO and VP, PepsiCo India stressed upon the need to be transparent with your employees to keep them happy. “Keep it consistent and clear. When you are offering them rewards, don’t change the reward. Don’t change the goalpost once the race has started. You need to keep communicating with your employees so that they know what they are getting. You need to tell them it’s not just the amount of money that hits your bank account but also the entire benefits that count. You need to build trust. Even at PepsiCo, we have our CEO sending out mailers every Monday morning, explaining the learnings of the week and where our goals stand.”

3) Cultural change is important:

Nowadays, corporates are looking at working with startups or acquiring them. Corporates are driving innovation and have younger age employees driving these teams. Talking about how for different groups, you have different cultures and benefits, Aditya Kohli, Senior VP, HR, Bharti Airtel, said, “While there is a group that consists of the top employees and they have a certain style of working, we also have groups that are driving innovation and are working with new age technologies like Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence. For this group, it’s the skill that masters and it becomes a criteria for their rewards. There’s also the need to have a non heirarchial approach.”

Talking about cultural change, he said, “We even had a team that worked for long hours in the office and wanted bean bags instead of the regular chairs so they are more comfortable. We went ahead with their demand, if that’s what they want to drive excellence. When we acquired a company, we let them function on their own for 6 months instead of forcing them to imbibe our corporate culture.”

8 Rules for Succeeding as an Entrepreneur !!

Before I talk about how to succeed, I need to talk a bit about failure. In Silicon Valley, failure is lauded, especially fast failure. The theory is that you learn by your mistakes. Ironically, most of the people who have the created the most successful businesses had no real history in their market and even less so-called experience. Indeed, their very ignorance of the potential pitfalls seems to have been what enabled them to succeed. Walking a high wire, it seems, is much easier when you don’t think there’s a 100-foot drop on either side. Put another way, success is a function of our belief that we will succeed and our determination not to fail.


       Here are the 8 rules as an entrepreneur

1. People are more important than strategy:

If you focus on finding people you want to be with and who you think are talented, chances are you’ll come up with great ideas together that will work. If you start with an idea and then try and find the talent, chances are you will be putting a square peg in a round hole.

2. Know what customers really want:

Business school teaches the importance of listening to customers. That’s great if you know what to listen for. Sometimes customers don’t know what they need but can describe what they really want or what they hate. For example, people don’t want to buy gasoline, but they do want to be able to drive to the beach. Henry Ford has often been quoted as saying, “If I’d asked my customers what they wanted they’d have said faster horses.” Whether he said it or not, the point is a good one. What business you are in is driven by your ability to know what people really want, not what they say they want.

3. Market size is everything:

When VCs look at any investment, they will try to forecast the potential market. If the market is big enough, even a half decent company could get to be a decent size. Dominating a really small market may take ten times the effort. Work out how big your opportunity is and what piece of that market you think you could own.

4. Be the customer:

How many times have you seen employees acting against the interest of their company, because the rules of the company made them act that way? Billions of dollars are lost every year because employees do what they’ve been told to do, not what they think they should do. If you are constantly putting yourself in the shoes of the customer and listening to your staff, you will eliminate the craziness.

5. Don’t chase bad revenue:

When starting out, you want customers, but be wary of taking just anyone’s money. Some customers can be bad for business, especially in the services sector. If you take on customers that pay well but make your employees’ life hell, they’ll rightly quit and then you won’t have a business.

6. Understand your culture:

Businesses are like families; they have values and a way of being. These are often a function of the leader or founder’s values. As you grow, you need to be sure to involve people who share those values. For example, if your company has a laid-back, fun culture where you empower people and don’t take yourselves too seriously, then don’t hire people who want a corner office and an assistant. Culture can make or break a company. If you don’t know what your culture is, you’d better find out.

7. Timing is everything:

One of the biggest reasons businesses succeed or fail is a function of timing. Being in the right place at the right time matters. All of which goes to my first point about not fearing failure; in life, you don’t always know until you try.

8. Think about growth:

We have all wondered what we’d do if we won the lottery. When starting a business, you need to think about what happens if it actually takes off. How will you scale? Who would you hire tomorrow? Would you open up in another city? Would you franchise the business? If you are trying to build the airplane while flying it, don’t be surprised if you crash.

MORPHEUS HUMAN CONSULTING provides an Excellent Business Platform for Recruitment with Low Investment and Minimum Risk along with Reasonable ROI with the benefits of a Household Name and a dedicated Team supporting YOU with timely guidance on how to operate effectively.

Some Of Our Franchise Reviews:

1. All along my life I wanted to become an entrepreneur. Morpheus Human Consultant has given me a chance to accomplish the same. I chose MHC because I think its business model is unique and futuristic. My association with Morpheus is still in infancy. But I am really impressed by the concept behind “Talent Now” and professionalism being displayed by “Support Team”. – (Franchise Partner – Pune)

2. Working with Partner like you makes our business a great joy and to have own business after working for over 25 years in various industries gives satisfaction. The first year was not encouraging and went in loss but with the great provision from support team, Client Relationship Manager, Talent Acquisition Team we were able to understand the business and earned a great profit from our business. One more positive feedback that I would like to add is the total transparency in the work process. Thanks for your support. – (Franchise Partner – Mumbai)

3. I always wanted to balance my career and personal life without sacrificing my professional responsibilities and working with Morpheus helped me manage both the things. Working with Morpheus keeps me updated with the current job market scenario. To be frank, I have not got any financially benefit but haven’t loose also anything instead had great experience to start my own business in HR field. – (Franchise Partner – Delhi)

For Further details contact us on 022-40649800 or

email us on franchise@mhc.co.in