10 Creative Recruiting Strategies To Hire Great People

In this job market, you’ll have to do things differently if you want to avoid sifting through a huge stack of poor-fit resumes — or if you want to reach your dream candidates who already have a job elsewhere.

That’s why many companies are embracing creative recruiting.

From adding interactive group interviews to the recruiting process to actively looking for talent in unusual places, we’ve created a list of ways companies are innovating the hiring process.

These methods can make your business stand out from the crowd and put you in touch with your ideal hires.

Use self-selection to find out who’s really interested:

To help you better separate the wheat from the chaff, you should try adding another layer between resume-submission and the one-on-one interview. One option is inviting all eligible applicants to an open group event, such as an Open House
The Open House strategy also enables you to see how people interact in groups
 

Arrange for group interaction:

Interacting with potential candidates in a group setting is an excellent way to see their character, level of interest, working knowledge, and communication skills. It also lets you see if they’re a good fit with your corporate culture.

Interactive interviews can be conducted in different ways, but the fundamental feature is inviting select candidates in for a group session, where you and current employees can engage with them.

Handpick dream candidates and show them you want them:

Passive candidates (those who are already employed and not actively jobhunting) are most likely to be your dream hires, but you’ll never attract them without letting them know how much you want them.

Reaching out in a really personal manner demonstrates that you’re willing to go out of your way to get their attention.

Look for talent in unlikely places:

The Director of Talent Acquisition at Quicken Loans tells the New York Times how his company (which is regularly listed in Fortune’s “100 best places to work”) hires fast while maintaining its corporate culture standards: by looking for great people in unexpected places.

For example, the company once conducted a “blitz” of local retail stores and restaurants, sending employees out to interact with workers and offer interviews to those who really stood out.

“Too many companies focus on industry experience when they recruit… We can teach people about finance. We can’t teach passion, urgency and a willingness to go the extra mile,” Quicken tells the NYT.

Attend events that are NOT job fairs:

Job fairs often turn out to be somewhat useless, since the best candidates probably already have a job. So you should try looking great talent at other events that aren’t traditionally recruiting-related.

Search forums such as Meetup for group events that are likely to be attended by people qualified for your open position.

For example, if you needed a graphic designer in New York City, you could attend a graphic design-focused meetup in the area and look for potential candidates. You’ll already know they’re passionate about what they do, and you’ll be able to get a feel for what they’re like in person.

Make yourself stand out with non-traditional media:

A written job description on a jobsearch site won’t necessarily make you stand out. A video or podcast, however, will do just that.

Using non-traditional recruiting media is also a chance for you to convey something about your corporate culture to jobseekers.

Whether it’s through a fun video on YouTube showing how awesome it is to be an employee at your business, or a recorded podcast describing the position and your company.

this strategy will differentiate you from all the other recruiters out there — and hopefully make you more appealing to the cream of the crop hires.

Actively search profiles and social networking sites:

Rather than sifting through the hundreds of bad-fit resumes you might get in response to your job post, take the search into your own hands. That way, you’ll only see candidates who have the criteria that you want for the position.

Several websites allow candidates to create profiles that include their resumes and other details that can give recruiters a better understanding of their knowledge and talents.

Visual CV is another reputable place to look through candidate profiles.

You’ll not only be able to screen for the perfect resume, but you’ll also have a chance to learn a little more about that person pre-interview.

Advertise in places frequented by your ideal candidate:

You should definitely focus your recruitment process in ways and places that fit with your dream hire. Online communities, as opposed to all-inclusive job boards, are another good place to target your recruitment process at a specific demographic. For example, if you’re looking for a developer, try searching for the terms “developer forum”; you’ll find multiple places just for developers where you can publicize that you’re hiring.

Consider past candidates:

Former rejections could make great hires now.

In the past, you may passed over a good candidate for some reason or another — perhaps their salary requirements were too high, or they weren’t an ideal for that other position.

Whatever the reason, if you think they would be good for this opportunity, it can’t hurt to get in touch with them now and see if they’re interested.

Publicize referral incentives:

Referrals are excellent sources for great hires. You just have to let people know that you’re looking, and maybe offer an incentive to send someone your way.

A financial reward for the referrer is standard if you end up hiring their referral; if the referrer is an employee, non-monetary perks can work, too (i.e. a premiere parking spot for the year, extra vacation days, etc.).

To publicize outside the company, a great way to to spread the word is to include a note in your e-mail signature indicating that you’re hiring and what you’re looking for.

Use LinkedIn for recruiting:

LinkedIn doesn’t have the buzz or the customer base of Facebook or a Twitter, but it has quietly changed the way many jobs get filled. While you are unlikely to land your next job as a car mechanic using the professional social network, LinkedIn has become ubiquitous in the business world.

Big corporations and professional recruiters pay through the nose for premium LinkedIn features, but even the basic service can be a powerful recruiting tool if you know how to use it. Here’s how to get the most out of LinkedIn without breaking the bank.

What you must do to get a job !!

Gone are the days, where one used to stay in the same organisation for years together. Employees change jobs regularly depending on greener pastures available elsewhere. Therefore, organisations have also started taking interviews seriously in the hope of landing skilled and stable employees who can prove to be valuable asset in the long run.

More and more people analytics is being used to help organisations identify the right person for the right jobs. In order to ensure that you crack interviews in 2017, here are a few skills that you can use:

1. Build the right resume: The primary objective to a resume is to get you to the next stage i.e. the interview process. It should be properly structured with primary objective in mind. To move ahead from other resume’s one might want to add additional sections like: Objectives/ Long Terms Goals/ How I can add value/ Achievements etc. Get creative so that your profile stands out from all the others out.

2. Prepare in advance: The interview needs preparation which very few people understand. Very few times, do we come across employers who do their homework before taking the interview. Generally, they start with “tell me something about yourself” while they quickly skim through your resume hunting for their next question. This is the question that you should prepare for and rehearse before you go for the interview. Take time and prepare an interesting and engaging response which will tilt the balance in your favor from the start!

3. Research the company and the person: This is, by far, the most important step that you should carry out before you venture out to present yourself. Go through the company website to look at the organisationculture and products. Look whether they are financially sound. It is also important to see whether you can find out something about the person who will interview you.

4. Be tech savvy: Computer skills are becoming more and more important with each passing day. Your target should be to become an expert with using technology to your advantage. Brush up your MS office Skills and for people in marketing, learn about digital marketing. You can showcase these in your resume and Interview which will again help you stand out.

5. Clean up your social media accounts: Many people now-a-days are stalked by the HR department on social media. Be careful at all times what you post and what it conveys. Keep all your accounts clean of any objectionable comments.

6. Lead the interview: You might not know it but there is always a way to lead the interview. Answer questions in such a way so that the interviewer is curious to ask the next question on the same subject. There are times when you might be asked about your experience on some project or elaborate on your achievements. You can lead these questions to areas that you are most comfortable discussing. This way, you can put your best foot forward and impress the interviewer(s).

7. Ask insightful questions – Many interviewers give you an opportunity to ask questions at the end of the interview. You could do some preparation for this also. Ask insightful questions about the role and the organisation. Also, try to judge from their response whether they are favorable towards your candidature or against.
Lastly, always be well dressed, relaxed and confident. These characteristics show through and add to your personality.

Source: http://bit.ly/2z0xrcW

Employer Brand vs. Talent Brand: Why the Difference Matters

Maybe you’ve heard (or even used) the term “employer brand” without being completely sure what it means and how it’s different from the concept of “talent brand.” If so, I won’t tell anyone—and I’m here to help clear things up.

Coined in 1996, employer brand is a relatively new niche that falls under the larger umbrella of talent attraction. While talent brand and employer brand have some areas of overlap, these two terms have several key differences.

Most of those differences are tied to the voice of your potential hires, or your audience. Make no mistake, you have lots of audiences. In fact, I always say that there are at least three sides to every story. Let’s take a closer look at what makes these concepts distinct and why they’re both important to your business’s reputation as an employer.

The benefits and risks of employer branding

An employer brand is all about storytelling. It encompasses how you want your organization to be perceived and the specific messaging you use when sharing information about your company.

Companies have a great deal of control over their employer brand marketing, which can sometimes cause problems—like when multiple companies turn to the same messaging again and again. Do these phrases sound familiar?

  • Our people are our greatest asset.
  • We have amazing benefits and perks.
  • We offer career development and progression.
  • We’re the most innovative company in our space.

These seem like great claims at first, but after the 27th time a prospective employee hears the phrase “We have the best people,” it can start to lose meaning. This is what I like to call ‘Employer Branding.’

It makes matters worse if these claims turn out to be inaccurate, which happens more often than you might think. Even if an organization’s leaders mean well, they can develop a warped view of their employees’ experiences.

And when companies attempt to sell an inaccurate or inauthentic brand to potential employees, it could cost them in both the long-term and short-term when it comes to talent attraction, employee engagement and employee retention.

Your talent brand is forged by honest voices inside your organization

According to TalentBrand.Org*, your talent brand is “the honest story of life as an employee inside your organization, as told by the employees in parallel with the company.”

So how can you make sure your idea of your brand lines up with the reality of what employees are saying? That’s where a holistic view of your reputation comes in.

While your employer brand can be shaped and honed by your organization’s leaders, talent brand comes directly from employee experiences and feedback.

In other words, your talent brand is not what one website or channel says it is. Current, past and even prospective employees shape your talent brand through social media posts, review site comments, direct network conversations, face-to-face interactions and referrals.

On Indeed’s Company Pages, for example, you’ll learn what people are saying about your company’s culture, management, pay, benefits, work-life balance, job security and advancement opportunities.

This feedback from real employees provides a valuable touch point and reality check for company leaders who want to make sure their employer brand accurately reflects employee experiences. Again, this is just one piece of the Talent Brand puzzle that you need to examine.

The value in the overlap

Companies can get the most from their talent brand and employee brand identities when they consider these two concepts together. That’s why Indeed’s Company Pages feature employer-created videos and social feeds alongside reviews and ratings directly from employees.

How do I know which channels are important enough to monitor? I look at where I’m getting the biggest sources of candidate traffic.

Bringing these two types of branding together helps you visualize the overlap between the way you view your brand and how employees see your company. This area of overlap can shed new light on where the heart of your brand actually lives.

By focusing on the aspects of your brand that employees truly appreciate, you’ll get a stronger sense of which of your company’s unique perks and attributes you should amplify and share more widely, to attract the types of people you’re looking to hire.

And who knows? It may even mean you can swap out that “we have the best people” line for something that’s a much better fit.

Source: http://indeedhi.re/2zhPSgm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How To Use Google As Your Resume!!

If you’re job hunting, you may be thinking the first thing you need to do is put together your resumé. That used to be true before the Internet. But these days, the new resumé is called Google.

What an employer finds out about you simply by Googling your name helps determine whether you get hired. And you’ve got to clean up what the employer finds before the company or nonprofit finds it.

There are four things you can do about this to boost your chances of getting hired: you can edit, fill in, expand and add to your Google resumé. I’ll provide details shortly.

Why Employers Reject Job Hunters
Almost all (91%) of U.S. employers have visited a job-hunter’s profile on social networks and more than 69 percent of employers have rejected some applicants on the basis of what they found. Things that can get you rejected: bad grammar or gross misspelling on your Facebook or LinkedIn profile; anything indicating you lied on your resumé; any badmouthing of previous employers; any signs of racism, prejudice or screwy opinions about stuff; anything indicating alcohol or drug abuse and any — to put it delicately — inappropriate content.

Also on Forbes:

What is sometimes forgotten is that this works both ways.

Sometimes (68% of the time), an employer will offer someone a job because it liked what Google turned up about the person. Things like the creativity or professionalism you demonstrate online; your expressing yourself extremely well online; the employer’s overall impression of your personality online; the wide range of interests you exhibit online and evidence online that you get along well and communicate well with other people.

4 Ways to Improve Your Google Resume
So, now, here are my four tips for improving your Google resumé to help get hired:

1. Edit Your Google Resume
Make a list of adjectives you’d like employers to think of when they consider hiring you. Then Google yourself and see what the search engine pulls up. Also, go over any pages you’ve put up on social sites like Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest or YouTube and remove anything you posted there — or allowed others to post — that contradicts the impression you would like to make.

If you don’t know how to remove an item from a particular site, type or speak the following into a search engine like Google: “How to remove an item from [Facebook]” or whatever.

2. Fill In Your Google Resume
On sites like LinkedIn and Twitter, fill out your profile completely. Leave no part blank unless you have a very good reason. Most importantly, be sure to keep the profile up-to-date. There is nothing that makes you look less professional than having an obviously outdated profile.

Make your LinkedIn profile page really stand out when employers go browsing. Here are some hints on how to do it:

A photo is mandatory. Surveys have shown that not having your photo listed in your LinkedIn profile is a turnoff for most employers. The likelihood that your LinkedIn profile will get viewed increases 11 times if you include a photo. Make it a shot just of your head and shoulders, make it sharply focused and well lit, dress up for it and smile.

In the section called Job Title, if you aren’t searching for a career change and like what you’ve been doing but the title you have doesn’t contain the words a hiring manager would use to search for someone who does what you do, put in a slash mark and then add the title he or she would use. If you’re looking for a change, after listing your current job title, enter a slash and add the industry you want to find a job in so an employer’s search engine will pick you up.

In describing your past jobs or experience, don’t just make a list of tasks or achievements. LinkedIn gives you enough space to tell a story, so tell a story. Summarize some major achievement in that job and then tell a story of how you did it and what the measurable results were. List your skills: you increase the likelihood that your LinkedIn profile will be looked at by 13 times if you do.

In the Summary section, be sure to state whatever you think gives you a competitive advantage in your field.

Under Specialities, list every keyword you can think of that would lead a search engine to find you for the job you want.

Add links to any website you feel would help you stand out — for instance, your blog, if you have one and it’s solely devoted to your area of expertise and your Twitter account, if you’ve only been posting tweets that manifest your expertise in your field.

Join one or more LinkedIn groups related to your expertise. Post sparingly but regularly when the people in it are discussing something you’re an expert on. You want to get a name and reputation in your field.

3. Expand Your Google Resume
There are several ways to expand your presence on the Internet:

Forums: Professional sites like LinkedIn have forums, or groups, organized by subject matter. Look through the directory of those groups or forums, choose one or two related to your industry or interests and, after signing up, speak up regularly when you have something to say that will quietly demonstrate you are an expert in your chosen subject area.

Blogs: Start a blog if you don’t already have one, and update it regularly. If you don’t know how to blog, there are helpful sites like Blogger.com that give you detailed instructions. If you have a blog but it roams in terms of subject matter, start a new one that is more narrowly preoccupied with your particular area of expertis

Twitter: The advantage of Twitter is that it has hashtags and Google is indexing all those tags and tweets. Figure out which hashtags employers are likely to look for when they want to find someone with your expertise and experience.

4. Add to Your Google Resume
It will take any employer or HR department some time to sift through all the stuff about you that may appear when it does a Google search. You would help them by summarizing and organizing the pertinent information about yourself. You can do this by composing an old-type resumé and post it on the Internet (where Google will find it).

What Color Is Your Parachute: 2018 has detailed advice on the best way to craft a resumé. If you need additional guidance, search Google for the topic “keywords on an electronic resumé” or “examples of resumés” or “how to write a resumé.” This will turn up free resources and advice as well as professional resumé writers.

A final tip: Where you post your resumé makes all the difference in the world. If employers post their vacancy on a job board like Monster.com or CareerBuilder.com, they typically have to look through 219 resumeés from job hunters who respond before they find someone to interview and hire. If they post the vacancy on the employer’s website, they typically have to look through just 33.

However, if the job hunter takes the initiative to find a specific job rather than waiting to find a vacancy by, say, typing the name of that job into a search engine and then sending resumés to any companies whose name turns up, employers only have to look through 32 applications before finding someone to hire. If the job hunter takes even more initiative, chooses a company where he or she would like to work and gets a referral from an employee within that company, employers have to look through only 10 such candidates before finding someone to interview and hire.

Source: http://bit.ly/2zkDpFh

Why Some People Get All The Good Job Offers

When working with job seekers, I often hear something like this, “I want to be more like my friend, ___. He’s always getting contacted about good job opportunities. His career has been one great position after another.” Then, they sigh and talk about how easy the person makes it look. Finally, they start to discount the person’s success with statements like, “He got a lucky break when he worked at ___.” Or, “He’s kind of intense when it comes to networking.” They say anything they can to make themselves feel better.

You can imagine their surprise when I say,

“Your friend isn’t lucky. He’s figured out the two most important activities needed to be in control of your career.”

We’ve all heard the saying, “Luck is where preparation meets opportunity.” It’s true, but most people don’t know how to translate that to actionable advice for their career. Until now…

If American Idol host, Ryan Seacrest can do it, so can you!

A great example of someone who has figured the two steps to a killer career strategy, is Ryan Seacrest. He has six jobs right now. He’s mastered the process I’m about to share with you. It’s not rocket science or brain surgery. All it takes is this:

Step 1: Know what your workplace personas are. Companies hire people who can solve problems and alleviate pains. After all, it’s costing them an average of 130-140% of your annual salary to employ you. Your workplace personas are how you like to create value for an employer. It’s the way in which you excel at saving and/or making them money – enough money to justify the cost of employing you. There are eight key personas in the workplace. All of us dominate in 2-3 of them. When we know our workplace personas, we can choose opportunities that leverage them. This is how people build successful track records. They use the skills they most enjoy to do the job. A total win-win.

Step 2: Consistently educate people about your workplace personas. Once you know your workplace personas and start to build a successful track record with them, the next step is to learn how to share your success with others in a way that doesn’t sound like bragging. Smart professionals know this is done via strategic networking. When you have meaningful conversations with people about problems you love to solve for your employer and discuss how you do it, you’re organically marketing your skills and abilities. The more you do this (i.e. answer questions for people, offer free advice and assistance, share how your company overcame similar challenges with your help, etc.), the stronger your professional reputation becomes. At which point, when people hear about jobs that are open and problems employers need solved, their interactions with you come to mind – and the phone calls and emails start coming in with those coveted job opportunities.

Want the best jobs? Act like a business-of-one.

The most successful small businesses build their reputations and market their services. They’re known for delivering results, which leads to an increase in referrals. You’re a business-of-one, which is the smallest type of small business. That means, you have to be even more vigilant about building your reputation and marketing your services – or suffer the consequences. Gone are the days where you could just keep your head down, do a good job, and stay with a company for 30 years. Today, you need to always be growing your skills AND letting people know about your growth. Otherwise, you will find yourself at the mercy of the job market.

Stop envying your peers and start doing what it takes to be the in-demand professional you long to be known as. Especially, now that you know how to prepare so opportunity can find you!

Source: http://bit.ly/2kv1N3N

6 Questions Great Leaders Ask Their Teams

It’s humbling to ask questions. After all, the moment that you ask a question is the moment you reveal what you don’t know. To some, asking questions is a death-blow to their ego, while to others, it’s a stepping stone to clarity. In fact, during research for their book The Innovator’s DNA, the authors discovered that the strongest leaders (and the people destined for the C-suite) asked questions because they were humble enough to acknowledge they didn’t know everything and confident enough to admit it.

The fact is, the most influential leaders realize that their questions are more powerful than their answers because questions shed light on two important things:

1. What’s important to you

2. What’s on your mind

As a direct report, when you know what’s important to your manager and what he or she is thinking then you also know what youneed to do to produce the right type of work for him or her and for your team.

Here are six questions great leaders ask their teams:

1. What does success look like?

This is a simple question you can use to clarify and align efforts. Miscommunication amounts to a $62.4 million dollar loss for large companies and a $420,000 loss for smaller companies, so it pays to get on the same page right from the outset. Also, “check-in” frequently to ensure everybody’s still heading in the right direction.

2. What’s holding us back?

This is great for identifying the one obstacle standing between the team and a decision. Once you identify what’s in your way then you’ll have a better idea as to the courses of action you can take to overcome it.

3. Who has experience with this?

The only time reinventing the wheel actually makes sense is when the wheel turns out better than before, which isn’t easy to do given that a circle is a circle. Keep in mind that people speak up (or remain quiet) based on the environment you create. Not everybody will automatically chime in when they have something to say, which is why it’s up to the leader to set the right environment for those discussions (and questions) to occur.

4. What’s the climate here?

This is a great question because it opens the door for candor. I was asked last week, “What’s one thing that you see business teams doing wrong?” My answer: candor. They lack candor. Candor is a business imperative because you can’t move forward without it. In their book The Loyalist Team, the authors (a team of four) share their insights about what makes high-performing teams sustain their greatness. After working with thousands of teams across six continents, the authors concluded that “individuals on these teams are skilled, accomplished, and driven, but what sets them apart is that they trust, challenge, and push one another to exceed expectations.” And you build trust through candor.

5. What if this setback is really an opportunity in disguise?

A setback could be anything. Maybe a sales team didn’t hit their numbers for the quarter, or maybe a product launch missed its launch date (and subsequent launch party). More than anything though, a setback represents change—a difference between what you expected to happen and what actually occurred. So, instead of wallowing in it, try finding the opportunity. Search for patterns that might’ve indicated this setback would indeed happen and study them so you’re better prepared next time. This is the main purpose of conducting after action reviews—to learn as a team what works, what doesn’t and why.

6. What hasn’t been achieved yet?

The natural follow-up to this question is “How might we?” Every new innovation stems from curiosity. Take Polaroid, for instance, who created instant film after a three-year-old asked, “Why do we have to wait for the picture?” Questions help people organize their thinking around that which they don’t know yet.

Questions build leadership capacity because they help people make their own decisions, not to mention build the psychological safety needed to ask deeper questions. The bottom line: if you want a better answer, ask a better question. 

Source: http://bit.ly/2xmbRNK

Here are the list of mistake students make in their resume

Following is a list of common mistakes students make in their resumes. Have a look and see how many of these errors (if any) your current resume contains. You may correct them now or in subsequent chapters.

Tip

These mistakes have been identified and listed as per what is generally expected in a professional resume in the industry. There may be cases where you may have to follow the guidelines issued by your placement office or recruiting company which may be contradictory to what is written here. In such situations, you have no choice but to follow what is asked by them.

1. The resume file is not named properly:

Have you named your resume file as resume.doc or cv.doc or something similar? This is not only unprofessional but also makes it difficult for a recruiter to identify your resume once he downloads and saves your resume to a folder (Think what will happen if all the applicants’ resumes were named as resume.doc inside that folder).

Correct practice to name your resume is First Name Last Name – College Name.doc. For example, if you are Rahul Rana from IIT Madras, you can name your resume as Rahul Rana – IIT Madras.doc.

Also wherever possible, always send your resume in PDF format – looks very professional.

2. The resume runs into 2 pages or more :

While there is no set rule that your resume necessarily have to be within 1 page but more often than not students’ resumes run into multiple pages either because it contains too many irrelevant details or because the space has not been utilized efficiently. If your resume is more than 1.5 pages long, get your scissors ready. Remember, if Steve Jobs can mention what he did in one page, so can you!

3. Resume follows a 2 column structure :

At times, a few students make their resume in a 2 column structure. Please don’t. Stick to a one column structure as provided in sample resumes. Two column structures make the reading extremely difficult for a reader as it becomes difficult to decide which column one should focus on. Plus it is highly space in-efficient.

4. Your resume contains logo of your college :

There are a few colleges where Training & Placement cells make it compulsory that you put your college logo on top of your resume – in that case you cannot help it. But otherwise, or when applying off campus, you do not need to include the logo and make your resume unnecessarily bulky. Remember, your resume is your advertisement,not your colleges. If you have your college logo in your resume for no reason, delete it NOW.

5. Your resume contains your photograph :

Again, not required, if you have it in your current resume – please remove it. There is absolutely no need of a photo in a resume unless you are applying for a position where how you look matters such as aviation, hospitality, media,films, modeling etc. Else it is quite an outdated practice and unnecessary bulks up your resume file..

6. Your resume contains a very generic Career Objective statement :

If you have a Career Objective listed in your resume, does it read something like this?

“To experience the challenges of a working engineer in a healthy but competitive environment of industry, enabling to extract the best out of me which is conducive to learn and grow as professional, thereby directing my future endeavors as an asset to the organization”

These kind of copy pasted and generic statements serve no purpose other than making it clear to a recruiter that you have no idea of what you want from your career. You should either have a very specific objective statement outlining your interests or have none at all (yes that is OK). An example of a good Objective statement is given

below –

“4th year B.Tech Computer Science student at IIT Madras with excellent academic record and keen interest and practical exposure in the field of information security, especially web applications security.”

7. In your resume, things are not listed in reverse chronological order :

Look at your Academics, or Projects, or Internships, or Co/Extra Curricular section. Does it contain information in reverse chronological i.e. most recent first order? Yes, in each section, you should mention the most recent activity/achievement at the top and the least recent at the bottom. The reason being that employers are most interested in what you have been upto recently and you should make it easy for them to find out that information. If you have written it any other way in your resume in any section, please correct it now.

8. You have mentioned each year’s/semester’s GPA/% Marks in your Academics section :

Not required, just mentioning aggregate marks/CGPA is enough. For example, if you have completed six semesters of your B.Tech degree, you do not have to write each semester’s GPA; aggregate CGPA at the end of 6th semester is enough.

9. You have listed all the courses and labs that you have done till date :

Not required, strike that section off please. At best list 2-3 most relevant courses along with your grades in those courses (if grades were good). If an employer wants to know all the courses that you have done till date, he/she will most probably ask for an official transcript anyway.

10. You have included knowledge of Windows in your Technical Skills section :

Please don’t. It’s like saying you know English alphabets – it’s that common.

Job Hunting While You’re Employed? Don’t Make These Six Mistakes

When you’re in a stealth job search, you have to be extra careful to keep your job search under wraps.

Here are six mistakes never, ever to make as a stealth job-seeker.

Six Mistakes Stealth Job Seekers Can’t Afford To Make

1. Don’t update your LinkedIn profile all at once if your co-workers are first-degree connections of yours. Do it in several small steps so that the changes to your profile are never glaring from one day to the next. Never, ever use a LinkedIn headline that makes it clear you’re job-hunting. (Currently unemployed job-seekers can do that, but not you!) Make sure your LinkedIn settings specify that updates to your profile will not generate a message to your connections.

2. Don’t go to job fairs where your own company has a booth — or any job fair where you might be spotted by somebody who knows your boss (or your boss’s boss, etc.) Job fairs are not a great job search channel for stealth job-seekers because their success rate for any individual job-seeker is so low and the risk of broadcasting your job-hunting status is so high.

3. Don’t send out a blast email announcement to tell your friends and contacts you’re job-hunting. If you do, somebody on your distribution list is bound to forward your blast email announcement to everybody they know — and the world is small enough that you could have problems as a result. Tell your friends about your job hunt one-on-one or over the phone, and emphasize the confidential nature of your search.

4. Don’t respond to “blind” job ads that don’t specify the employer organization’s name. It could be your own company!

5. Don’t go to networking events and tell the people you meet that you’re job-hunting. Network as a consultant, instead. Tell the people you meet that you’re working full-time and available to consult part-time. Get some consulting business cards and give them out.  Morpheus Consulting part-time is a great way to get a new job because hiring managers can meet with consultants any time they want (they only need a higher-up’s approval to actually hire a consultant, and sometimes not even then) whereas most hiring managers won’t meet with a job-seeker unless they have a job opening.

6. Do not forget to tell every recruiter, interviewer and HR person you deal with during your job search that you are flying under the radar. Tell them multiple times.

Your goal is to let your boss know you’re job-hunting only at the precise moment when you give notice.

Source: http://bit.ly/2xxUwTD

7 Questions – How do you create clarity in your job and those of your employees?

The importance of a good employee-manager relationship:

The manager-employee relationships are vital for organisational effectiveness and efficiency.

Q1 Why is what I do important? Q2 What am I accountable for? Q3 How is my performance measured? Q4 How am I performing? Q5 What am I doing to improve my performance? Q6 What support do I need from my manager to improve my performance? Q7 What is in it for me, if I do great, good, average or below expectations?

Why is this relevant and important?

Despite it being basic I have experienced over and again that it does not take place and often it is only performed half-heartedly and this gives rise to several challenges.

Firstly, that the employee leaves the company due to a poor relationship with the immediate manager. Several studies show that the most often quoted reason for leaving a position is the relationship with the immediate manager.

Secondly, the performance or output from the employee is not optimal compared to what it should be.

Thirdly, a poor or less optimally performing employee has a less than optimal effect on the people and processes in the company.

Fourth, you can probably add to the list yourself, but the above mentioned three should be adequate cause for action.

The above outcome is bad for the company as well as the employee, hence worthwhile to ensure that employees and managers jointly have a good understanding of the job and their respective responsibilities this regard

The below outline is compiled of what I have picked up over the years from inspiring people, leaders I have come across and especially some bright HR people in Maersk Line and I have tried to apply the principles in my own work life, both for myself as well as for the people in my responsibility and I hope you find some inspiration either in your role as employee or as a leader.

Please note this is all about structure, not the interpersonal relationship on how we relate and communicate. Without respect and earned trust all structures come to naught, but this structure creates a culture of alignment and communication at the employee-manager level.

The work and job relationship description consists of seven (7) questions surrounding job purpose, responsibilities, measurements, feedback and managing expectations and outcome.

 Question 1 – Why is what I do important?

Always start with the WHY! Clarity of purpose is critical for motivation and can be used for guidance, when in doubt how to act.

The most important place to start is to ask and answer WHY is the job important to yourself as an employee. Someone may argue that the job is for the company’s sake and not for the employee’s sake, but I think the feeling of meaning, of purpose in one’s job is important for all people and most organisations desire employees with motivation. And frankly, getting up early every morning, commute to work, spend a large portion of your life working; it better be worth your while.

So, why is your job important to you? Is it just the money? Probably not, only you know. Is it a sense of belonging, an opportunity to learn new skills and develop as a person, opportunity for promotion and further development, the creation of good relations, meeting exciting people? Only you know – or do you? For many people it is necessary and a source of joy to belong to a group of people and we must not underestimate the importance of the social relationships in our teams.

Why is your job important for the company? Do you ensure the customers are more than satisfied? Or do you ensure that the people servicing the customers can do this well? You can also ask “What happens if I do a bad job?”, some people, maybe your nearest team-members, rely on you to do a good job or even a great job.

As leaders we work on ensuring the company vision, mission and strategy are clear and understood by all employees and that is very important. But, sometimes we forget to operational this at an employee level, and that may be cause for confusion, uncertainty or even discontent, especially if the employee feels there are discrepancies between the overall vision or strategy and his/her job.

This question is not the job description, but the answer could form the the introduction to the job description.

Question 2 – What am I accountable for?

 This question covers the activities that encompasses the job, the required output and the necessary output, perhaps some quality requirements and timeliness. Processes or systems, which the employee is responsible for, and also important relations inside the company or outside.

Matters that will often be described in the job description if such is available.

This is probably the first a new employee is informed about, since it covers what the employee is doing on a daily basis (or weekly, or monthly, or whatever is described), however, even if an employee has worked in the job for a longer time, it might still be worthwhile to revisit this once in a while.

 Generally a job description can include items such as:

  • Responsibilities
  • Tasks (Example: Prepare monthly reports)
  • Specific tasks (Example: Prepare monthly report for submission by 3rd working day of the month, and as a minimum include information on XXX and YYY, by using information from System ZZZ)
  • Hierarchical relationships (Example: This position reports to Director of Finance)
  • Requirements (The position requires specific knowledge about Danish Accounting standards and IFRS regulations)

It is important that the employee is fully aware of what his/her responsibilities are and at the same time it is important that the job description does not become a straitjacket, but has room for initiative and flexibility in line with changing requirements in the job and the organisation.

When an employee has served a year in a new position, the initial job description is likely no longer complete in relation to what the employee is actually doing and as time goes by the original job description becomes outdated, and as such it makes sense to revisit the job description from time to time.

Question 3 – How is my performance measured?

Or put in another way: “How do I know when I am doing a good job?”.

Do I have some measurable deliveries? For instance some KPIs? Something with timeliness or accuracy. Are there means to measure the quality of my work?

What am I measured on – Quality of my work – Efficiency – Innovation – Adherence to company values – Helpfulness/Being a team-player?

Am I responsible for some large projects to be delivered, by a certain date, within a specific budget or otherwise described.

Can my deliverables be described in relatively short sentences, which describe a future desired state?

How can I ‘objectively’ identify the level of my performance. Inside myself I know my effort level, but how do I know if the hard work results in the right performance?

Some organisations set targets for the following year, however, since the environment and the work tends to change over time, similar to the job description, as mentioned above, then sometimes the targets loose relevance or the targets are fulfilled already mid year, perhaps the projects were easier to finalize, and as such it is important that new targets are set.

Question 4 – How am I performing?

It is one thing to know the responsibilities and the required activities, as well as the expected output, the performance. It is another thing to assess how things are going. Am I performing? And how well am I performing?

The employee has an opinion, but so does the manager, and alignment facilitates a good dialogue.

Firstly, the employee must ensure to form his/her own understanding on the level of performance. Firstly by considering how the performance is measured and whether he/she meets the targets.

Secondly, it is also important to get feedback from the manager to assess the extent of alignment of the employee’s opinion and the manager’s opinion.

One thing is the personal performance, but also in the larger scheme of things, “are we delivering as per the overall purpose?“. For instance the employee delivers well on all personal targets, but overall the department is not meeting its targets, for instance within customer satisfaction, then that needs to be addressed jointly in the team and with the manager. Maybe the targets, or even the tasks, do not properly contribute towards the overall goal, and this must be addressed.

Sometimes there will be a difference in opinion. The employee thinks that he/she has made a stellar performance, whilst the manager will regard it as average. That has got to do with differing expectations or lack of clarity in either responsibilities or performance measurement or reviews. An on going dialogue is the most effective way to manage expectations and create clarity.

Do you get regular and clear feed-back from your manager? And how? Regular feedback is critically important for most employees in order to ensure to manage expectations and create alignment on targets, activities and behaviours.

Question 5 – What am I doing to improve my performance?

We can all get better at what we are doing, and we should strive to improve – for our own sake. So what am I doing to improve? In some cases it is a matter of working harder, going the extra mile so to speak. However, in most cases it is a matter of working smarter, not harder.

So, how do I reflect upon my job, my tasks and activities? Can I do it differently, more effectively? Do I need new training? Do we need to change the process, can we get the person who makes my input to make some changes and thereby make my job better? Can I do some changes in my output which is improving the work of the people who uses my work?

You can argue that any employee has two jobs – the current job plus the job of continuously improving the current job. In some organisations that is already included in the job description and measurements.

Question 6 – What support do I need from my manager to improve my performance?

One of the manager’s most important responsibilities is to ensure that the employees can perform and continuously improve their jobs. This requires that the employee has the right competencies i.e. the right skill-set and training to perform the job. But also the right environment, tools and support. Example: If there are challenges in getting the right input from another department, and the employee has tried in vain, then the manager must step in and take action and help to get this sorted.

Sometimes it is easy to help employees to improve performance, say an accounting employee spends a lot of time reconciling, then two computer screens may be a big facilitator in improving performance and perhaps job satisfaction. But it can also be more complex and requiring cross-functional process changes. For instance if an AP employee spends time on locating the purchase responsible on incoming supplier invoices, the solution may be to get the purchasing functions to inform suppliers to put purchaser’s name or department on the invoice.

Question 7 – What is in it for me, if I do great, good, average or below expectations?

The answer to this question is linked to the very first question i.e. Why is what I do important (for me)?

A pay-check is one answer and continued employment could also be one. Some jobs have bonus and incentives assigned depending on job performance, and some companies base salary increments on past performance, so money is one lever that companies use to try and secure best possible performance, although a number of studies show that there is no link between incentive and performance, but that discussion is not the purpose of the article.

Clearly, personal fulfilment from the feeling of doing a good job is important for most employees, but the positive recognition from management and peers is also a motivator for most people.

There may also be opportunities for promotion either into another position or by getting more interesting and challenging tasks and activities in the current position. Both may come with company supported education and courses, which may improve future employ ability and improved CV.

The above primarily goes for above average and great performances. If on the other hand the performance is below expectations and below average, then both management and employee need to do some soul searching.

First consider why the employee is performing poorly. Assuming all the preceding questions have been properly asked and answered i.e. purpose is clear, responsibilities are clear and performance requirements are clear and aligned, then have a conversation about why the performance is poor. Is it lack of skills, poor cooperation in the team, bad attitude on behalf of the employee or something else. On the basis of this it is the manager’s responsibility to put actions in motion to improve the situation, as also clarified in a previous question. However, sometimes it ends up with letting the employee leave the position.

Conclusion

For the employee it is important that the “Why this job is important for me?” is fulfilled. If it is not, then nobody gains and it is a lose-lose situation, because an unsatisfied employee is bad for business. So even if all 6 preceding questions have been asked and answered positively, and the manager has maintained a good feedback loop there may still be dissatisfaction and sometimes it is because the employee changes opinion in terms of what is important, but it can also be matters beyond the manager’s sphere of influence, so the above 7 questions do not solve all things, but it is a good start.

From a managerial perspective I venture that the 7 questions form a strong framework for focused employee-manager conversations, and it will work whether you have weekly, fortnightly, monthly, quarterly or annual one-to-one conversations, appraisals, performance reviews or whichever label is used in your organisation. The more frequent the conversation, the more emphasis on questions surrounding the actual performance, but do not forget to bring the other questions into play now and again. The conversations shall consider the employee’s seniority, maturity and competence into consideration, as well as attitude, as is the point of situational leadership.

Whatever you decide as manager, make sure to schedule regular meetings and stick to it, even if there is very little to review, you can always benefit from getting to know your employees a little bit better, so use the framework. You do not want to be in a situation where you only have a conversation with your employees, when there are problems.

Further Reflection – Is this all there is to good people management?

Is this all there is to it? As said above it is not. This is just one tool in establishing a structure towards an effective dialogue in the employee-manager relationship, and a model for analysis of your work-life or the work-life of your employees, which can create a foundation to build on. Other steps deal with creating strong and trusting teams and of improving one’s own leadership towards transformational leadership.

Several thinkers claim, that in order for people to be truly happy at work, three fundamentals must be achieved for the individual – Purpose, Hope and Friendships. This speaks to purpose of company and organisation and individual and the opportunity to improve on the individual’s situation and the social aspects, the sense of belonging.

As an employee what is your take on the 7 questions? Can you answer these for yourself and does it make sense for you? Is there anything you will change from now on?

As a manager what is your take on the 7 questions? Have you ensured that your employees have clarity of purpose in their roles, the employees understand how you evaluate their performance and do you perform regular feedback to the employees? Is there anything you will change as a result? Or do you subscribe to a different way of managing the important employee-manager relationship?

WHAT RECRUITERS THINK WHEN JOB SEEKERS ARE UNSUCCESSFUL?

Recruiters may seem intimidating, but they genuinely want the best for both candidates and the company. Good recruiters want you to have the best experience possible during the application and interview process–but even though they want the best for you, there are some things that they just can’t share.

Salary bands, candidate competition, internal HR tactics –let’s just call them trade secrets. They are the confidential information that, unfortunately, recruiters cannot divulge.

To get to the truth, we reached out to Omer Molad, CEO/founder of Vervoe, a recruiting company that replaces face-to-face interviews with online simulations for small- and medium-sized businesses. Molad built his business on the premise HR hiring is painful, and he has unique insight into the frustrations and insights of recruiters.

Here are a few of the secrets that Molad says recruiters won’t tell you, but really want to.

1. “We Could Have Gone Higher If You Had Negotiated”

Salary negotiations are like a game of poker–both job seekers and recruiters are trying to maintain control and win the hand. “Very few (if any) recruiters will be so bold as to say, ‘We took advantage of you and we don’t value you highly,’” says Molad. In fact, there is often a salary band or range that recruiters have for each role. Their initial salary offer is very rarely at the top of their salary band, so base pay–as well as benefits like vacation days, work hours, etc.–can usually be negotiated.

Glassdoor’s chief reputation officer, Dawn Lyon, says, “An offer is an offer, and very few employers expect you to take the first one out of the gate. So come to the table expecting to negotiate. Don’t just ask for more, but do so intelligently, with real numbers to support your argument. Use your research to put together a case for more base salary or a signing bonus, because if you don’t ask, you most definitely won’t get it.”

2. “Don’t Go Overboard With Buzzwords, We Can Tell”

It’s smart to include keywords in your resume and to come off as knowledgeable about your particular industry. However, “Don’t try to look smarter than you really are,” says Molad unabashedly. Authenticity is key. Recruiters and employers want your personality to shine–not your ability to throw out words and phrases like “synergy,” “move the needle,” “ROI,”feed the funnel,” etc.

“It’s not about specific questions or answers that stand out, but rather the candidates who display a great deal of passion about what they do that really stand above the rest,” says employer Academy Sports + Outdoors.

3. “You Never Had A Chance After That Bad First Impression”

Your mother was right: First impressions are everything. And according to Molad, few recruiters can get past a bad first impression. Unreturned phone calls, poor manners, and clumsy interviews will all hurt your chances of moving on to the next round. Hiring managers and recruiters will bite their tongues, fighting back the desire to say, “We just don’t like you,” says Molad. However, take it from us: You must really dazzle if you’d like to make up for a rocky first impression.

“Interviewers often care more about the likability of entry-level candidates than whether or not they’re actually qualified for the job,” says career coach Peter Yang. “This is because the person interviewing you will often also be your future boss and mentor, so it makes perfect sense that they would want to hire someone whom they personally like and want to work with. A strong interview performance means establishing a strong connection with your interviewer. Try to show off your personality instead of just answering questions robotically. You can even get a bit personal if you’d like to.”

4. “Your References Were Not Very Flattering”

If a recruiter or hiring manager had doubts about you, they won’t let you know if unflattering references just confirmed their doubts, Molad says. “Your references should talk about your strengths in specific situations– not just basic information,” adds HR expert Jordan Perez. “[References] should be ready to provide examples of actual projects where you exceeded expectations. Your reference should easily cite one or two situations that highlight your strengths.”

“Bad references can ruin your candidacy as much as good ones can strengthen it,” says Sam Keefe, digital marketing manager at AVID Technical Resources. Her advice to ensure that only the good shines through? “Give only references who will say positive things about you. Work hard to build good working relationships with coworkers and bosses.”

5. “I Back-Channeled You, And Found Out The Truth”

Backdoor references, or back-channeling, is one of the sneaky ways hiring managers and recruiters gather more information about you–it refers to when employers reach out to mutual connections in order to get their honest opinion of you. “This phenomenon is even more prevalent in the last five years or so because of LinkedIn’s growing popularity,” says Keefe. “Even if you choose not to give anybody there as a reference, backdoor references can reveal the skeletons in your closet. Backdoor references can be especially common when you’re looking for a job in sectors like tech.”

6. “We Already Gave The Job To an In-House Employee”

Unfortunately, it’s perfectly legal to advertise a job that is almost certain to be filled by an insider. In fact, some research has shown that internal hires generally perform better than external ones. However, “phantom jobs” can be downright annoying when you’re looking for a new position. Even though federal labor rules don’t require employers to post openings, many HR departments require roles to be listed on a job board for some period of time to ensure a fair hiring process. Therefore, Molad says, don’t expect recruiters to come right out and say, “It was a beauty parade to show management we ran a process, but it was a sham and you were never really considered.”

Source: http://bit.ly/2xDv6a2