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The 5 “Must Knows” of Job Interview Preparation

You’ve impressed an employer with your resume and they called you to schedule an interview. You’re ecstatic. Now, it’s time to get over the ecstasy and start preparing for the interview.

How do you prepare properly? Follow these five “must knows” of interview preparation:

Know Yourself. You got the interview, so you must have already communicated much of this in your resume and cover letter. Now, think about how you’ll describe yourself. What truly sets you apart from other candidates? What’s your “personal brand”? What are the strengths you bring to the job? Also, be prepared to answer typical and atypical interview questions. What are your career goals? Why do you want to leave your current employer? How can this job help you accomplish your career goals?

Know Your Resume. The interviewer has painted a mental picture of you by reading your resume and cover letter. Be sure you have a copy to refer to as you prepare for the interview. Since your resume should be targeted at the job description, you need to look for the parts they might ask questions about. For instance, you may have written about an accomplishment from a previous job that is not fresh in your mind but is critical to the position you’re seeking. So, jog your memory for some details that you can cite during the interview. CareerBuilder.com recently asked about 3,000 hiring managers about interview blunders by job candidates, and 30% said “not offering specific answers to interview questions” was a common and detrimental gaffe.

Know the Company. Go into an interview without having researched the employer and your candidacy may well be dead before your seat turns warm. With all the information available on the web, and the rise in importance of networking, you have no excuse for not knowing important data about the company before you walk into the interview. Fortunately, we’re getting better at this, according to a recent Accountemps survey of senior executives with the nation’s largest companies. The survey found that about four of every five executives (79%, to be exact) said candidates either somewhat or very frequently demonstrate knowledge of companies during interviews. That’s up from 59% in 1997.

Know What You Want to Ask. Close to half (48%) of the CareerBuilder survey base named “appearing disinterested” as a common interview faux pas among candidates. To demonstrate your interest, prepare two lists: questions whose answers you need to know and another of what you want to know. Which questions go where? That depends on what you feel is crucial to deciding whether you might want to take the job if it’s offered.

Know Your Interviewers. If the hiring manager or would-be boss is interviewing you, get to know about them, namely, their managerial styles, how they might react in a hypothetical scenario, such as a pressing project deadline or an unexpected drop in revenue. If you know the names and roles of your interviewers ahead of time, find out about them through their bios on the company web site (if they’re available) or through a web search. Gain a sense of what it would be like working for and with these people.

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5 Types of Decision Making Skills You Need To Know

 

Every workplace needs people with different types of decision making skills. All workplace decisions, both big and small, require a decision making process. Even if you do not realize it, you’re using some type of decision making process every day.

 

There are many different types of decision making processes, not all of which are explored here. For example, “Emotional” is a very common decision making process, used by people that make decisions based on how they feel.

 

There are some types of decision making that are both common and valued in the workplace. Those are the ones we’d like to highlight here.

The following are several examples of decision making, and an example of how you might use it in the workplace.

Intuitive – Intuitive is one of the simplest, and arguably one of the most common ways to make a decision. It should be noted that it is not always the best way. Intuitive decision making involves relying on the decision that feels right, without necessarily thinking about the logic that goes into that choice. An example may be deciding to use a software because you like it after a few minutes, rather than comparing it to other types of software and determining which is the better value.

 

 

Rational – Rational decision making is the type of decision making most people want to believe they do. It is the act of using logic to determine what is best, by reviewing all possible options and then evaluating each option using logic and rationality. An example would be listing out all possible marketing methodologies, along with budgets, data, and more, and then working out which one(s) would provide the best investment.

 

 

Satisficing – Satisficing is accepting the one that is satisfactory for the needs of the company. A non work example would be deciding you need coffee, and then going to the nearest coffee shop even if it’s not the best, simply because you get the job done. It means you may miss out on better options.

 

 

Collaborative – Collaborative is exactly as it sounds. Rather than make a decision yourself, you collaborate in some way to make the decision. An example might include meeting with others to get their input, voting on the final decision (although that may integrate other types of decision making models), or, otherwise relying on the group as a whole.

 

 

Combination – Not all decision making falls into a simple bucket. Many people use a combination of these different types of decision making styles. For example, rational and intuitive may be easily combined. The person doesn’t necessarily use any data, or create any logic charts, but they think about the decision from a logical perspective and then go with their gut on the final decision.

 

 

Understanding your preferred decision making style will help you prepare answers to interview questions.

Source: http://bit.ly/2ExTcqp 

5 Critical Mistakes that Could Destroy Your Career

This is that time of the year when many of us start to review our career; this usually starts with an audit of the past year — we review our goals, what we achieved and what we didn’t, and career highlights from the past year. It is then followed by setting resolutions and career goals for the new year. While there is nothing wrong with setting goals and making career resolutions for the new year, it is important that your career plans for this new year is made with a focus on one thing: mistakes to avoid.

If you want to achieve your career goals this year and have a much successful career than in previous years, you need to avoid these mistakes. Making one or more of them could destroy your career:

1. Ignoring Relationship With Co-Workers and Higher Ups

Most people wrongly assume that their career progression depends on their IQ and academic qualifications. This is very far from the truth. While these could have gotten you a job, you will need much more than that to have a progressive career.

According to Law Settlement Funding, “By far, one of the most important things if you want to move up in your career is to have a good relationship with your co-workers and superiors. In fact, this is often reported to be more important than other factors. If, on the other hand, you are not on good terms with co-workers and superiors and you think ‘it is just enough to do an excellent job,’ don’t be surprised if you are out of a job soon enough.”

2. Not Getting Enough Sleep

Many people sacrifice sleep in the belief that it is required to achieve their career goals and objectives. Not only is this not true, but it can be very dangerous. Besides the fact that lack of sleep has been linked to psychopathic behavior (and remember, not being able to get along well with employees and higher-ups can destroy your career), research actually shows that not getting adequate sleep does not necessarily give people the performance boost they assume they are getting. Instead, getting inadequate sleep (less than six hours daily for an adult) leads to the same effect as being drunk: it diminishes your performance and reduces your cognitive abilities.

So, if sleeping less is part of your plan to achieve your career goals, it could diminish your performance and reduce your cognitive abilities. It could also lead to you making career-damaging mistakes (since you could be operating on the same level as a drunkard).

3. Diversifying Instead of Focusing

While many will advocate “diversifying” as key to success, focus is what really makes a great career. Putting a lot of focused, undivided attention into being the best at what you do will lead to you having a stronger career than diversifying your efforts and energy into a lot of things. In fact, an analysis of the billionaires on the Forbes 400 list found that the majority of these billionaires got to where they are by being focused on one thing and reaching the peak of their career in the area of their focus. If you take a look at people at the top of your industry you will most likely notice the same thing.

“Diversifying” could limit your career trajectory. It could even destroy it. If you’re an accountant, for example, you will stand a better chance career-wise getting your CPA than learning to bake as a “side skill.”

4. Limiting Yourself by Not Networking

If you want to move forward in any industry, networking is the rule of the game: networking allows you to be aware of more opportunities, to connect to more people in your industry and to know about how things work beyond just your workplace.

Don’t make the mistake of limiting yourself by not networking — not only could it limit your growth potential, but it could make you redundant and potentially negatively affect your career prospects. Instead, network by attending industry conferences and events and connecting with people in other organizations similar to yours.

5. Not Being Careful About Your Social Life

Of course, it used to be that (for the most part!) what you do in your private life has little bearing on your career. Not anymore. In the age of social media and super fast information transmission, especially where most information posted online remain there permanently, not minding what you post on social media could not only cost you your current job, but it could also cost you future jobs and prevent you from moving forward in your career.

Being careful about what you post on social media should be paramount on the list of steps you take to advance your career — ignoring this rule could affect you beyond just this year. It can affect your career prospects forever.

Source: http://bit.ly/2EV84fm 

Soft skills for successful career in 2018

Soft skills at Morpheus Consulting

What is it that truly differentiates one candidate from another during the job application process? While most candidates may have similar academic qualifications for a specific job, it is the soft skills and extracurricular activities that set one job aspirant apart from the others.

Soft skills are key to building relationships, gaining visibility, and creating more opportunities for advancement. These skills are not specific to one career but are generic across all employment sectors. Have a look at them here:

Communication:

Communication skills are perhaps the first set of skills that all potential employers notice. Employers look for people who cancommunicate well – both verbally and otherwise. Communication skills boost your performance because they help you put exact messaging forward.

Team Player:

Employers look to team players to help build a friendly office culture, which helps retain employees and, in turn attracts top talent. A positive attitude – especially when it comes to working with others – is essential since it fosters team harmony.

Adaptability:

The ability to adapt to change and a positive attitude about the change, go a long way towards growing a successful career. Employers need workers who can adapt to industry shifts and keep the company running.

Leadership:

Leadership is the ability to influence others and achieve a common goal. Bosses and managers are always looking for employees with leadership potential because such workers will one day take over the reins and build on the company’s legacy.

Problem Solving:

Decision making and problem solving is another skill that is high in demand. The ability to identify complex problems and review relatedinformation in order to develop and implement solutions, can distinguish one employee from another.

How to Show Culture Fit in an Interview!!

Ask a hiring manager which top qualities they’re looking for in candidates, and culture fit is bound to be up there. It’s no surprise — research shows that hiring for culture fit leads to reduced turnover, cost savings and happier, more productive employees, so it’s definitely in a company’s best interest to find somebody who’s a good match.

But job seekers are often at a loss for how to show culture fit during an interview.  And although it can indeed be difficult, it’s far from impossible — you just need to follow a few best practices first.

1. Do Your Homework

The first step in demonstrating culture fit is actually knowing what a company’s culture entails. According to Megan Nunan, Career Specialist at Ama La Vida, “Culture fit sums up all the ‘extras’ about a company that you can’t classify into one bucket. Things like do you align with their values, do you mesh well with those already hired at the firm, could you thrive in the current environment, etc.” Luckily, you can find much of this through your own research before the interview even rolls around.

“Look at what they post about on social media, look at pictures of the office and people working there. These will all give you clues as to what they value and what the company’s culture is like,” she says. “It also never hurts to ask around — if you know someone that either works at the firm or knows someone that works there, taking them out for a quick coffee could be the best investment you’ll ever make in yourself.”

2. Get Introspective & Rehearse

As you learn about a company’s values, work style, office environment, etc., you’ll want to think about how those match your own. Not only will this help you identify whether or not the company is the right fit for you — it’ll also give you an idea of what points you’ll want to touch on during an interview. For example, if you’re interviewing at a startup and you realize that you’re highly independent, self-motivated and excel at working at a fast pace, you’ll want to proactively highlight all of those factors in your answers.

In order to do that, you may want to research some of the most commonly asked interview questions and think about how you plan on answering them.

“There are an endless number of cultural fit questions like, ‘what kind of corporate environment do you thrive in, who was your best boss and why, what do you love about your current job,’” Nunan says. “The key to answering these successfully is to first take the time to reflect on the type of company culture that best suits you and then answer in a way that shows you’re intentional about your desire to work at this firm and that your values align nicely with those of the organization.”

And remember: the more you rehearse the answers to those questions (yes, I mean aloud!), the more comfortable you’ll be when it comes time for the actual interview.

3. Dress the Part

When you show up for an interview, you want your outfit to be appropriate — but remember, “interview-appropriate” will have different meanings at different companies.

4. Ask Questions

The idea of having to ask questions in an interview can be stressful — after all, shouldn’t answering their questions be enough? But really, you should think of it as an opportunity. It’s a great way to get a sense of how things operate day to day and, perhaps even more importantly, prove how you would fit in there.

5. Be Honest

Demonstrating culture fit is important, but even more important is finding a job and company that fit your life. After all, if you’re going to spend 40+ hours a week there, you’ll want to enjoy it.

The perfect job and company are out there somewhere, so don’t feel like you need to force it. Odds are, when you do find the right opportunity, you (and the interviewer) will know.

HR Interview Questions That You Must Be Ready For

Behavioral interview questions ask you to spill out as to how you have behaved in certain situations in the past. Your responses give the HR interviewer an insight into how you might respond to a similar situation in the future. A small mistake in answering these HR interview questions can cost you that job; here are three questions that you must be prepared for.

So what is your salary expectation?

This is the dreaded money question. In the best case scenario, you want to do whatever you can to keep your options open and get the hiring company to provide a salary range first. “Competitive” means you expect to be compensated fairly and this approach puts the money ball back in the interviewer’s court. The interviewers may very well keep pressing you. Follow-up questions could include “What does competitive mean to you?” or “What do you make now?”

If you feel you must name a figure, choose a salary range that provides some negotiation room, and it is fair based on market value in your industry and city, as thumb rule the top of the range should be a number that would make you very happy (within reason).

One of the likely answers for this HR Interview question that you can give is,  “I’m very interested in this position so that I would be open to any competitive offer.”

Can you please explain this gap on your resume.

The HR interviewers tend to review your resume carefully and will notice if you have bee out of work between positions, and this is often seen as a sign that one of your job stints didn’t go, as you would have planned for. The career break may be for reasons that may be beyond work performance; your ex-employer may have gone out of business, your division got restructured, etc.  However, unless you clarify the interviewers tend to assume that you were fired or left under unfavorable circumstances.

You May Also Like To Read: 10 Tricky HR Interview Questions & Their Answers

If you have a positive or neutral reason for the gap, go ahead and concisely explain it. If it was a layoff that was unrelated to your performance, make that amply clear. If you were let go or there was another potentially sensitive reason for your departure, you’ll have to tread a bit more carefully. The key is to keep your explanation crisp and then make an effort to move the conversation along to more positive topics.  In these cases, it’s widespread to get sidetracked into discussing the grisly details of the separation or criticizing your former bosses or coworkers. You must explain what happened in few words and make it clear it’s something that could never happen again. At all costs, you should try to avoid using the word “fired” if you can. Deflect the interviewer attention to your track record of jobs that ended well. If the gap between jobs was lengthy, you should also make it clear that you were keeping busy with up-skilling, volunteering for social work, or taking a break to do your hobby. This shows that you are proactive and energetic.

One of the likely answers that you can give for HR Interview question is,  “The job and I did not fit together. On the hindsight, I ignored my gut feeling and took the position because it was a very generous offer. I have learned a lesson and won’t remake the same mistake.  Apart from this slip-up, I have been very successful in all the roles that I have picked up.”

Tell me about a time when you had to work with someone difficult

This HR interview question is designed to test your ability to handle conflict and work with different personalities. This question puts you in a spot because it forces you to talk about someone who derailed your apple cart. You have to handle this HR Interview question diplomatically and avoid any sign of negativity of ill feeling. Step out of the zone and try to recollect a situation in which you managed to keep a positive professional relationship with a difficult coworker, manager, client or partner.  By answering this HR Interview question smartly, you can help the interviewer see your professionalism and ability to remain calm under pressure.

 

Source: http://bit.ly/2z9NCTu

10 MOST DEMANDED PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCIES BY COMPANIES

 

If you are looking for a job, you should definitely know which the most demanded professional competencies by companies are.

First of all, we should say that a competency is the capability to apply or use a set of related knowledge, skills and abilities required to successfully perform your tasks at work. Nowadays, as the number of offered candidates is continually growing (not to say that a lot of them has quite a similar academic profile), the keys to a proper recruiting process rely on revealing the inner competencies.

Here you will find the top 10 of most valued competencies when it comes to hiring the right employee:

Optimism: try to show an enthusiastic and always-willing-to-help attitude. Seeing tough situations with positivity is really valued on anyone.

Flexibility: show capacity to adapt to changes. Don’t just react, be prepared as things never stay the same.

Team work: it is really important to get along and bond with your colleagues. If you are a “team person” you should already know that great things can be accomplished when working in a strong and committed group.

Initiative: show that you want to learn, every day. Don’t wait for your superiors to always tell you what to do, show that you know your work and ask for help when needed.

Loyalty: simple, be loyal to your company and culture. If you don’t really trust who you are working for, you should rethink if it’s is the right place for you.

Leadership: can you take decisions? Do you continually motivate your team? Does people see you as a role model? Then you are a natural leader!

Communication skills: knowing how to communicate with superiors and equals is a great asset, but alone is not enough. You should be a good listener too and take every opinion into account.

Creativity: a creative person will bring new fresh ideas even when not asked to. Innovative and problem-solving are two of the abilities that comes with this competency.

Transparency: be honest and clear with your words.

Energy: give the most you can, every time.

Though you shouldn’t have all of these, and of course, each job will demand its own, remember to always highlight and show your professional competencies. This will help you get through your job interview and, if you are already working, to grow in the company.

 

 

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Artificial Intelligence trends are HR realities

 

The emergence of Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies in the past years has profoundly impacted a tremendous number of companies and sectors. Take the example of supply chain functions – these have been completely reshaped and fully robotized warehouses are now the new standard. In parallel, other support or corporate functions have also caught this technological wave, but not with the same speed and pace. Human Resources today are the perfect illustration: the shift towards Digital HR has started for pioneer organizations, but the majority of companies are still in the reflection and conceptualization stages. On one hand, there is an overwhelming feeling related to the immensity of ‘the possible’ in terms of HR technology offerings, and on the other hand, there is a need to answer growing expectations from an evolving workforce.

Today, HR C-levels are facing a common main equation: Ensuring that HR roadmaps will become even more relevant in the C-suite and help streamlining organizations while improving the employee’s experience.

But how are AI technologies concretely impacting the HR community?

 

Beyond the reflection and conceptualization stages mentioned earlier, AI is clearly acknowledged as a critical component of the future HR service delivery model. Most of discussions today are about how to incorporate chatbots, robots or other cognitive solutions within Human Resources departments.

Just to name a few examples:

 

  • Robotic process automation (RPA) is a new norm today. Any process optimization exercise almost always considers robotic automation as a solution. In this context, almost all HR processes are subject to automation. The main recurring ones that we observe are related to recruitment, core HR administration, compensation, payroll and performance, but all HR processes that require significant manual input are candidates for automation.
  • Chatbots are also getting a lot of traction. For example, in the HR space, chatbots are replacing traditional FAQs. Cognitive chatbots can also be trained by humans in order to improve their correct answer rate. This is a real game changer and robust accelerator to change the employee experience.
  • Robots are less and less considered as exhibition gadgets and can now be found in some HR front office departments.
  • Voice assistants on mobile for any employee, anytime, anywhere are becoming more common – say hello to the new HR ‘Siri’. A vacation request for example can then be part of a quick phone conversation, instead of several less efficient transactions involving HR systems and emails.
  • What we are observing, is that AI technologies are becoming fully embedded within the HR community. The initial doubts and fears have been overcome by most HR professionals and AI is recognized as a real added value to the employee. The HR operating model shift is ongoing and we are only at the early stages as the technological change is evolving at an exponential speed. Tomorrow new Artificial Intelligence offerings will emerge and will continue to reshape HR departments.

Source: http://bit.ly/2zgAGyP

Tips To Clear The Internship Interview With Flying Colors

Getting placed in good company for internship goes a long way in building your career, it gives you a head start. Here are few questions that will help you in clearing the HR interview round for securing a dream internship role.

Why do you want to intern with us?

As a golden rule, you must, research the company and the internship description before stepping in the interview, so that you can speak intelligently about why it appeals to you. The best answer to this question will go beyond talking about what you are looking for and gives them insight into your specific ability/ skills that prepares you to do great work in the internship role

Sample interview Answer:

“I have always been awed by your company and my marketing professors tell me that your internship program is one of the best in the service industry. Our college alumni’s tell me that your interns get an opportunity to do a lot of hands-on field marketing work. Marketing is one of my greatest strengths and I stand in the top ten students in the service marketing elective, hence I firmly believe I can make a valuable contribution during my internship stint.”

How will this internship help you meet your career goals?

By asking this question during the internship interview, the interviewer is probing to learn more about your careergoals.  He is looking for more information on these areas

  1. Do you have a clear idea of the next steps in your career path?
  2. Do your career goals fit with what the internship offers?
  3. Your knowledge and understanding of the internship position.
  4. Whether you have you done your research to understand the organisation and the internship program?

Though this question is about you and your goals, make sure that you are not coming across as self-centered. Weave your answer to show how it will be a win-win situation for both you and the company if you are selected for the internship role.

Sample interview Answer:

“Thanks a lot for asking me this question, this internship stint would give me an opportunity to gain some very valuable hands-on experience in the manufacturing industry. My goal is to find a full-time position as a production assistant on the shop floor, after my graduation next April. By working with your company, I will get an opportunity to work in a smart factory with some of the best minds. As a fresher, I am ready to work hard and work on any assignment in the Production division that adds value to the company and my career experience.”

I am sure you would have made some tough academic choices; tell me about it?

Through this question, the internship interviewer is trying to understand how you think, how you make decisions, and how you operate under pressure. Through this question, the interviewer is trying to see how you might respond in a similar situation while working for them. For this question, choose a real life academic situation in which you utilised your smart decision-making skills and it led to the positive outcome.

Sample interview Answer:

“In the early days of my career year, I accidently bumped into seniors who were doing doctoral research in Machine Learning. The first year curriculum for engineering was very heavy, leaving me with little or no time, and the doctoral student would have completed his thesis by the time I would have gone into the second year. I am a state level badminton player, I decided to skip my sports sessions for a year and spend the evening time, assisting The Doctoral student as a research assistant. I knew that my long-term career path would be in Machine learning and I wanted to learn as much as possible early on. I had to work hard and give up a lot of social activities over the last year, but I know I made the right decision and I am currently on track to publish a research paper on ML.”

Tell me more about our industry?

The interviewer is asking you this question to test your industry knowledge; they are not expecting a monologue on the history of the industry.  They are keen to see if you know about the latest industry trends, what are three-four big challenges facing the industry and what are the new innovations that could shape the industry in times to come.

I am curious to know, how did you choose your college and this stream?

Through this question, the internship interviewer is going to gauge how you have approach decision-making and your educational goals and priorities. In case you are applying for an internship that is not closely related to your field of study, be ready to explain as to why you are making a changeover and how your curriculum gives you the leeway to do this role. As a spin to throw you off guard, it is common for the internship interviewer to follow up by asking you whether you feel you made the right choice. Keep off from negativity about your college or your stream.

Source: http://bit.ly/2zf0cnY

Legal HR: Recruitment strategies for MNCs entering India

India has become an attractive business destination for multi-national companies over the past few decades. The Indian market throws several opportunities for talented individuals, and it is essential that the MNCs are well prepared to grab the best talent at the beginning of their operations. In this article, we delve into the important recruitment considerations that an MNC entering India must keep in mind while devising its recruitment strategy.

Building the Set-up

For a multinational, while it is not only essential to understand the various statutory benefits for employees in India and their applicability to the concerned organization, it is also equally important to understand and strategize for the various industry practices. Employees in India are eligible for several benefits like provident fund, gratuity, compensation in case of injury, statutory bonus, etc. Further, employers are obligated to comply with laws that mandate the development of a safe, and employee-friendly workplace, viz., prevention of sexual harassment, factories act, shops & commercial establishments act, etc. Registrations and ongoing compliance with applicable laws are not just legal requirements, these are also essential for retaining the talent pool.

Tailoring Employment Documentation

Most MNCs coming to India would already have in place their global employment agreements and employment policies, and we often hear from them if they can replicate these in India to maintain uniformity of standards applicable to their workforce globally. While the short answer to their requests would be a ‘yes’, the MNCs will also be required to undertake necessary revisions to ensure that the policies are not only aligned with the applicable laws in India but also reflect the industry practice.

One such aspect which requires closer review and consideration to suit Indian needs is ‘non-compete’ covenants. Considering the edict under Section 27 of the Indian Contract Act, 1872, post-employment restrictions like ‘non-compete’ are not enforceable under the laws of India. However, mostemployers may still retain such covenants in the employment agreements to act as a moral deterrent for the employees. Typically, a ‘non-compete’ restriction is applied on an employee during the tenure of his employee and between 6 (six) months – 24 (twenty-four) months after cessation of employment. Coupled with attrition in some of the sectors (IT/ ITeS being one such), without careful consideration, this may not fare well for organizations. ‘Garden leave’ is also an offshoot of ‘non-compete’, and is a common addition to employment agreements of mid to senior-level employees of MNCs.

Jurisprudence in these matters reflects a nuanced approach taken by courts in instances of ‘non-compete’ – while ‘non-compete’ continues to remain unenforceable on individual employees, courts have successfully carved out instances wherein such negative covenants may still hold ground.

The other area of concern which requires a sensitive approach is a manner of handling confidential information. Necessary attention must be given to fine-tuning confidentiality clauses.

Bringing foreign talent to India

MNCs planning to parachute foreign employees to India for undertaking specialized projects must understand the legal implications of such import of talent in India. The applicable law requires foreign citizens employed in India (referred to as ‘international workers’) to get themselves registered with the provident fund regulator, and a percentage of their entire salary shall be deducted towards provident fund contribution. It is advisable that this contribution be factored in upfront while computing the remuneration package of the ‘international worker’.

Marrying global best practices with Indian employment trends

MNCs may consider few facets of employment practices as routine in their home jurisdiction. However, implementation of such practices locally may give them an edge over their Indian competitors. For instance, the Indian law on prevention of sexual harassment at workplace gives protection to only female employees in case of a claim of sexual harassment. MNCs with gender-neutral anti-sexual harassment policies may come forth as progressive and welcoming to potential recruits. Similarly, the addition of ‘paternity leave’ and ‘bereavement leave’ in the employment policy of the MNC may be a good addition to their package, since such leaves are otherwise not statutorily mandated under Indian laws.

Conclusion

MNCs must make the most of their global expertise in attracting the brightest talent for their Indian desk. They must leverage their international reputation to the fullest potential to maintain the competitive edge in talent market. We firmly believe that compliance of employment laws in letter and in spirit, coupled with the universal best practices, will keep MNCs in good stead.

Source: http://bit.ly/2AWJ0Tj