5 Types of Decision Making Skills You Need To Know

 

Every workplace needs people with different types of decision making skills. All workplace decisions, both big and small, require a decision making process. Even if you do not realize it, you’re using some type of decision making process every day.

 

There are many different types of decision making processes, not all of which are explored here. For example, “Emotional” is a very common decision making process, used by people that make decisions based on how they feel.

 

There are some types of decision making that are both common and valued in the workplace. Those are the ones we’d like to highlight here.

The following are several examples of decision making, and an example of how you might use it in the workplace.

Intuitive – Intuitive is one of the simplest, and arguably one of the most common ways to make a decision. It should be noted that it is not always the best way. Intuitive decision making involves relying on the decision that feels right, without necessarily thinking about the logic that goes into that choice. An example may be deciding to use a software because you like it after a few minutes, rather than comparing it to other types of software and determining which is the better value.

 

 

Rational – Rational decision making is the type of decision making most people want to believe they do. It is the act of using logic to determine what is best, by reviewing all possible options and then evaluating each option using logic and rationality. An example would be listing out all possible marketing methodologies, along with budgets, data, and more, and then working out which one(s) would provide the best investment.

 

 

Satisficing – Satisficing is accepting the one that is satisfactory for the needs of the company. A non work example would be deciding you need coffee, and then going to the nearest coffee shop even if it’s not the best, simply because you get the job done. It means you may miss out on better options.

 

 

Collaborative – Collaborative is exactly as it sounds. Rather than make a decision yourself, you collaborate in some way to make the decision. An example might include meeting with others to get their input, voting on the final decision (although that may integrate other types of decision making models), or, otherwise relying on the group as a whole.

 

 

Combination – Not all decision making falls into a simple bucket. Many people use a combination of these different types of decision making styles. For example, rational and intuitive may be easily combined. The person doesn’t necessarily use any data, or create any logic charts, but they think about the decision from a logical perspective and then go with their gut on the final decision.

 

 

Understanding your preferred decision making style will help you prepare answers to interview questions.

Source: http://bit.ly/2ExTcqp 

ROLE OF WORK EX IN MBA ADMISSIONS

 

 

 

Here is my article on the role of work experience in getting a student into a good MBA College.
Few common questions have been answered in this article.
Hope you find it useful.

So, is it advantageous to have work experience prior to commencing on the MBA journey? The question is straightforward but the answer is not. Duration, job role, industry/sector of work all contribute to the experience becoming an asset or a liability.

 

1.First things first- why MBA?

 Although the question might seem redundant, it is essential to understand the perspective of those already  having  jobs. Quitting a job and pursuing MBA would have the following cost implications:

  1. The existing flow of income would stop. Most flagship MBA courses in India are 2 years long. This would mean a gap of 2 years between the last and next pay cheques.
  2. A significant investment in course fees and living expenses. Many MBA students apply for educational loans, thereby creating financial obligations for the future.

 

 

2.What is the significance of the work experience in the MBA process?

 

  1. MBA entrance exams: It is tougher to prepare for MBA entrance exams in parallel with your job . Work means a break from academics coupled with a restricted amount of time for preparations. Consequently, those having jobs have to exhibit greater tenacity and focus to gear themselves for entrance tests.
  2. Selection into top colleges: This is one aspect where having work experience generally favours the applicant. IIM Bangalore, for example, has a 5% weightage for experience. Therefore, a person with experience can get through with a score lower than a fresher’s.
  3. The actual MBA coursework and campus life: Work experience obviously endows one with specialized domain knowledge. This practical perspective is useful in both theory-based coursework as well as projects based on market scenarios. Further, campus life provides a tremendous opportunity for personal growth. Those who have gone through the churn of corporate life appreciate this aspect better.
  4. The MBA jobs: Companies treat 0-18 months of work experience as a single category. Companies offer similar job profiles to these students. It is relevant to discuss the concept of ‘lateral placements’ here.

 

 

3.How Important is My College GPA After few Years of Work Experience?

 

With 3-5 years of work experience, you can present essay content that demonstrates the deepening and broadening of your professional skills and experiences, reinforcing the idea that you have matured into a highly effective and impactful young professional and that you are no longer defined by your undergraduate performance. Ideally, your GMAT score should be strong, which will also reinforce these ideas.

Strive to secure recommendation letters that emphasize this same message. Some candidates take business courses after college at a reputable institution, building an “alternative transcript” that provides evidence of their current abilities.

 

 

4.What do the Admissions Committees look for in a candidate’s Work Experience?

 

          3 Aspects Admissions Committees Look For In Work Experience

Think about the amount of time a B-school has in hand to judge your application… just 1 or at the most 2 hours to know who you are and what your potential is. In such a situation, your work experience comes to their rescue. AdComs turn to your work experience to quickly know what you have been doing over a period of time and what domain expertise you bring to the table.

  1. Pedigree of the company you worked with:

Are you working with Google or Microsoft? If yes, great! If not, no problem. This is because Admissions committees do understand that not everyone gets into a Google or a Microsoft. Yes, though it’s true that a big brand does leverage your chances of getting into your dream B-school, the good news is that even if you are working for a start-up, your application will not be rejected solely on this basis.

However, if you are working for a small brand, you should be able to quantify your performance, roles and responsibilities and precisely what value addition you brought to your employer.

  1. How well did you perform at work?

There is something even more important than the brand name of the company you work with and the number of years of experience you have.Now, is there any standard or norm to appraise this? Your performance is directly related to the number of promotions you got.

If you are able to show a couple of jumps, this adds a lot of weight to your application.

 

  1. Roles and Responsibilities:

You may be a great software engineer, doing a great job assigned to you.
However,Was your job restricted only to IT coding?
Or were you also involved in the cross-functional and cross-cultural roles?
For instance,
Did you work in other functions also such as pre-sales, functional consultancy etc?
Have you worked, studied or traveled abroad?
Even if you have not worked abroad, have you undertaken any such project where you had to deal with foreign parties?
Are you a person who can appreciate and work with people from other cultures?

Remember, this holds true for professionals belonging to other industries also, not just IT. It is very crucial that you provide precise quantifiable information that will demonstrate your initiative to take more challenges and responsibilities and show your excellence in these.

 

REAL QUESTION : SO DOES WORK EX REALLY MATTER?

 

The straightforward answer is YES. Let me explain it to you with a real life example.

The whole idea of MBA is developing your Management and leadership skills and use them in real (mostly but not only business) world. Therefore you are supposed to study many business courses like Finance, Marketing, Economics etc in  a B School.

Now consider two individuals. One is fresher and the other one has a work ex of let’s say 5 years. The fresher let’s assume (and he will be) brilliant in academics and hence will grasp the concepts easily. However what do you actually mean by those concepts, how do they affect in day to day lives, that understanding cannot come without work experience.

For example – you want to become captain of a hockey team, first of all you need to play hockey and then only you can become a captain. Similarly if one becomes a Manager without work ex, he or she will be like a hockey captain who has been to a nice bschool but hasn’t played hockey ever.
THANK YOU FOR READING

BY MR. KAILASH SHAHANI

 

5 Critical Mistakes that Could Destroy Your Career

This is that time of the year when many of us start to review our career; this usually starts with an audit of the past year — we review our goals, what we achieved and what we didn’t, and career highlights from the past year. It is then followed by setting resolutions and career goals for the new year. While there is nothing wrong with setting goals and making career resolutions for the new year, it is important that your career plans for this new year is made with a focus on one thing: mistakes to avoid.

If you want to achieve your career goals this year and have a much successful career than in previous years, you need to avoid these mistakes. Making one or more of them could destroy your career:

1. Ignoring Relationship With Co-Workers and Higher Ups

Most people wrongly assume that their career progression depends on their IQ and academic qualifications. This is very far from the truth. While these could have gotten you a job, you will need much more than that to have a progressive career.

According to Law Settlement Funding, “By far, one of the most important things if you want to move up in your career is to have a good relationship with your co-workers and superiors. In fact, this is often reported to be more important than other factors. If, on the other hand, you are not on good terms with co-workers and superiors and you think ‘it is just enough to do an excellent job,’ don’t be surprised if you are out of a job soon enough.”

2. Not Getting Enough Sleep

Many people sacrifice sleep in the belief that it is required to achieve their career goals and objectives. Not only is this not true, but it can be very dangerous. Besides the fact that lack of sleep has been linked to psychopathic behavior (and remember, not being able to get along well with employees and higher-ups can destroy your career), research actually shows that not getting adequate sleep does not necessarily give people the performance boost they assume they are getting. Instead, getting inadequate sleep (less than six hours daily for an adult) leads to the same effect as being drunk: it diminishes your performance and reduces your cognitive abilities.

So, if sleeping less is part of your plan to achieve your career goals, it could diminish your performance and reduce your cognitive abilities. It could also lead to you making career-damaging mistakes (since you could be operating on the same level as a drunkard).

3. Diversifying Instead of Focusing

While many will advocate “diversifying” as key to success, focus is what really makes a great career. Putting a lot of focused, undivided attention into being the best at what you do will lead to you having a stronger career than diversifying your efforts and energy into a lot of things. In fact, an analysis of the billionaires on the Forbes 400 list found that the majority of these billionaires got to where they are by being focused on one thing and reaching the peak of their career in the area of their focus. If you take a look at people at the top of your industry you will most likely notice the same thing.

“Diversifying” could limit your career trajectory. It could even destroy it. If you’re an accountant, for example, you will stand a better chance career-wise getting your CPA than learning to bake as a “side skill.”

4. Limiting Yourself by Not Networking

If you want to move forward in any industry, networking is the rule of the game: networking allows you to be aware of more opportunities, to connect to more people in your industry and to know about how things work beyond just your workplace.

Don’t make the mistake of limiting yourself by not networking — not only could it limit your growth potential, but it could make you redundant and potentially negatively affect your career prospects. Instead, network by attending industry conferences and events and connecting with people in other organizations similar to yours.

5. Not Being Careful About Your Social Life

Of course, it used to be that (for the most part!) what you do in your private life has little bearing on your career. Not anymore. In the age of social media and super fast information transmission, especially where most information posted online remain there permanently, not minding what you post on social media could not only cost you your current job, but it could also cost you future jobs and prevent you from moving forward in your career.

Being careful about what you post on social media should be paramount on the list of steps you take to advance your career — ignoring this rule could affect you beyond just this year. It can affect your career prospects forever.

Source: http://bit.ly/2EV84fm 

8 Habits of Employees That Get Promoted

Getting a promotion takes more than just doing your job well. To move up the ladder to the next step if your career, you have to prove to decision makers and leadership that you are ready and deserving enough to take on more responsibility. This takes consistently working your best, staying dedicated to your work, and much more.

If you’re sick of being passed up for promotions, check out these eight habits of employees that get promoted. Make small changes as necessary if you’re ready to take the next step in your career.  

1. Set and Communicate Career Goals
Be goal-oriented

Before the start of the year, sit down with your boss to set and discuss your professional career goals. Be open about where you see yourself 6-months or a year. A good boss will help you achieve these goals by giving you opportunities to grow and provide support to keep you on track.

“In many cases, he or she truly does want to see you achieve your goals. As a manager myself, I constantly ask my employees ‘Where do you see yourself in five years?’—because if there’s a way I can help them along, I’ll do it. Whether that means putting in a good word for them in a different department at my current company or assigning them specials projects that will help them build new skill sets for a different role, I want to help,” says Katie Douthwaite Wolf, The Muse contributor.

They key, says Wolf, is to avoid announcing plans to “jump ship or that you want to take over your boss’s position.” Instead, think bigger and broader and come ready to discuss the ways you think your boss can help.

2. Always Be a Team Player
Be collaborative

Employers don’t like when employees are focused on “I” rather than “we.” They want team players who are committed to helping the greater good of the team, which ultimately benefits the company:

“A good employee volunteers his or her efforts before even being asked. They volunteer for more tasks and responsibility, and not just because of immediate reward,” according to the guide, How to be Promotable. “This type of employees simply goes above and beyond and will be the first thought of when promotions are being decided.”

3. Make Yourself Indispensable
Be irreplaceable

How can you make yourself an indispensable member of your team? One way is to become the go-to person for something specific, like designing dynamic sales decks to dealing with challenging customers. People in positions like this are not only sought after by coworkers, but also seen by leadership because they naturally stand out as someone people are always looking for.

4. Keep Learning
Take initiative

Show your boss that you’re committed to continuously improving and developing your skills by finding learning opportunities, both within the office and outside of it. This doesn’t mean you need to get your Masters or PhD, unless that’s relevant to your job. Instead, enroll in one webinar each month, use your own money to attend conferences, or ask to be put on projects outside of your department. This shows that you’re serious about your career, and aren’t waiting for someone else to get you where you want to go.

5. Document Your Success
Advocate for yourself

When asking for a promotion, leadership is going to want to know what kind of value you bring to the business. Rather trying to think back at all you’ve accomplished, build a “working” portfolio throughout the year. After you’ve completed an important project or performed a record sales month, document it. When noting your successes, focus on the most important details:

“Keep a record of everything you do that enhances the company’s bottom line, that puts the company or your department in a good light, that is creative and innovative, and that shows your loyalty and commitment to the organization,” says Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D.

This tracking shows that you’ve been successful and improved the company, and are invested in the work you’re doing.

6. Don’t Be Afraid to Take Charge
Show leadership potential

Do you display passion, trustworthiness, decisiveness and confidence? Possessing these types of leadership skills is essential for getting promoted. After all, the first step in being a leader is acting like one. Don’t get involved in office politics or develop bad habits, like being late or missing deadlines. Leaders need to be great role models for the employees they manage and work with, and without these skills, it will be hard to get a management promotion.

7. Network with the Right People
Stay connected

Take advantage of every networking opportunity you have, even if it’s a small get together with new co-workers at lunch. Networking with others within your organization and otherwise will allow you to get to know the people who can provide support now and in the future. It’s also a chance to promote yourself and your skills as well. You can reap similar benefits by getting involved with groups in your organization, like those who help plan events or keep the office stocked.

8. Be an engaged employee
Get involved

Being engaged goes beyond paying attention or taking notes in meetings—both of which are also important. It means being an active member of your organization, attending every optional  “Lunch and Learn” or coming up with new ideas for sharing successes in the workplace. This shows your commitment to the company and the success of your co-workers.

Get Promoted This Year

Getting promoted is not an easy task—it takes time, learning and dedication to yourself and the business. Successfully manage your own career path by using these eight tips—you might just get that promotion you’ve been hoping for.

Source: http://bit.ly/2E7LL98 

7 Ways to Get Recruiters & Job Offers to Come to You

Did you know that you don’t have to spend hour upon hour trying to find a job, and that you can do things that will have potential employers approaching you instead? Yes, this is a reality for many people, but it isn’t something that just happens. You have to work at it, and you need to market yourself in a way that is going to make you very desirable to potential employers. Today we are going to take a look at seven ways to get recruiters and job offers to come to you, instead of the other way around.

1. Start Networking

It is true that a lot of people aren’t hired because they filled out a job application or sent in a resume. They are hired because they have connections, people that they network with who are able to help them in their career search. Now is the time to get out there and network with everyone you know, from friends and family to former coworkers, employers, professors, etc. The more networking you can do, the better off you will be in the long run. Let everyone in your network know that you are looking for a job, and make sure that they are well aware of your education, skills, and experience. If they think you are a fit for a certain job, they won’t hesitate to recommend you.

2. Build Your Brand Online

“You are your own brand, and you need to build that brand and promote it as much as possible. It is important that you start building your brand online, because this is where employers are going to be looking for potential employees,” suggests Dima Midon, an expert from TrafficBox. Use all of the online tools at your disposal, particularly LinkedIn, which is a professional network that allows you to really promote yourself as a professional, and someone who is an expert in your field. This is a great tool for job seekers. Make sure that you keep your profile up to date, especially when it comes to contact information, so when an employer searches you, they will be able to contact you if they are interested in learning more.

3. Create a Professional Website

Let’s say that you have already applied for a job that you really want. The employer is going to want to learn as much about you as possible, and they are usually quite impressed when they see that candidates have their own professional websites. Your website is basically an extension of your resume, where you have the opportunity to really expand on your education, skills, experience, and knowledge. You can include samples of your past work, your portfolio, contact information, and a lot more. Make sure that your resume is up to date and included as its own separate section of your website, and also include your LinkedIn profile. Consider trying a platform like Squares peace to get started!

4. Keep on Applying for Jobs

Even if you are waiting for employers to start seeking you out, don’t stop applying for other jobs while you are waiting. After all, you could end up waiting for a long time, and you don’t want to be out of work and not able to pay your bills just because you are waiting for the perfect job to come along. Remember, most people who apply for jobs are rejected at least 15 times before they actually receive an offer of employment. Figure out what you have done wrong at the other interviews, and keep on applying until you get it right, and get the job offer you really want. The only real problem this is going to cause is that you could end up with several job offers, and have to decide which one you are the most interested in.

5. Dress for the Job

You may not have the job yet, but you should always be dressed as if you do. If you are interested in a certain type of profession, you should dress for that profession on a regular basis. Don’t run to the store looking sloppy. This could be just the time when you end up running into someone in your network, a potential employer, etc., and they are not going to see you at your absolute best. Another bonus to dressing for success is that the better you look, the better and more confident you are going to feel. It is particularly important to dress for the role when you are meeting employers for interviews, applying for jobs, etc. You need to look the part for every type of job you are interested in.

6. Don’t Badmouth Former Employers

The last thing a potential employer wants is an employee who badmouths their former employers. For one thing, no one likes to have someone around who is constantly complaining about something. You need to have a positive outlook, and as the saying goes, if you don’t have anything nice to say about someone, don’t say anything at all. One of the most common job interview mistakes that many people make is saying bad things about their former employers. Yes, you do have to be honest about why you are no longer employed by the company, but you need to find ways to put a positive spin on things.

7. Let Recruiters Know You are Open

Let’s get back to LinkedIn. It isn’t just enough to have a LinkedIn profile. You need to let recruiters that you are “open”. There are several ways that you can do this, including having your phone number and email address in the summary section (many recruiters don’t bother going any further than the summary, so you need to give them what they are looking for). Make sure your profile has a professional head shot photo. If you have a silly photo, or none at all, it is going to make potential employers think that you are not going to be professional and take your job seriously. Also, make sure that your profile is “on” so they know you are available.

Source: http://bit.ly/2EgrVWi  

7 Tips to Hire Best Candidates in 2018

 7 tips to hire best candidates in 2018

 

If you are a smart recruiter, then finding the right candidate for your organization is not hard to find. Hiring right talent – even in a competitive job market – becomes easy with well-thought out strategies. Top recruiters spend time formulating sound recruitment tactics which are both efficient and effective in procuring the best and the brightest employees. Here are some tips for hiring best candidates in 2018.

 

Use of Technology:

Technology plays a key role in improving the overall efficiency and effectiveness of the hiring process. Recruiters often use technology to select appropriate candidates, reach out to them easily and most importantly, fish the best out of the lot.

 

​Cross industry hiring:

Organisations are now looking for talent who can apply specialist knowledge in a generic industry. People who can use their experience to make a better tomorrow will be in demand and hence, cross industry hiring will receive a lot of fillip.

 

Power of review:

Employer review platforms – such as Glassdoor- offer an unbiased and clear picture to job seekers about their dream companies. The new generation of job-seekers extensively research prospective employers before they make a career move. Hence recruiters should pay attention to their employer brand and concerns surrounding it.

 

Use of analytics:

Today, recruiters are flooded with data pertaining to a variety of topics. This includes talent catchment, candidate preferences, performance of candidates on board, reasons why candidates refuse offers, and so on. Analytic support is becoming extremely crucial to decide which candidates to go after and how to keep them engaged.

 

Going social:

While job portals are the most preferred hiring medium for nearly 55% organisations, social media hiring is also gaining importance, revealed a recent study done. With significant penetration of Social Media – both in business and employees’ personal and professional lives – social networking is becoming a key source to tap diverse talent pool.

 

The mobile revolution:

More companies will develop apps that help schedule and record time and attendance, aid employee engagement, create digital to-do lists, productivity trackers and complete a range of other tasks. These apps will have the ability to access data stored in the cloud and be accessible from multiple devices. A smart recruiter must make use of these apps to save on time and resources.

 

Catch them young:

On the campus hiring front there has been a steady increase in the number of Pre-Placement Offers (PPOs). Year 2018 may see offers being rolled out to students who intern or do projects even in their second year of college. Hence keep a watch on the campus relevant to you.

 

 

 

 

Soft skills for successful career in 2018

Soft skills at Morpheus Consulting

What is it that truly differentiates one candidate from another during the job application process? While most candidates may have similar academic qualifications for a specific job, it is the soft skills and extracurricular activities that set one job aspirant apart from the others.

Soft skills are key to building relationships, gaining visibility, and creating more opportunities for advancement. These skills are not specific to one career but are generic across all employment sectors. Have a look at them here:

Communication:

Communication skills are perhaps the first set of skills that all potential employers notice. Employers look for people who cancommunicate well – both verbally and otherwise. Communication skills boost your performance because they help you put exact messaging forward.

Team Player:

Employers look to team players to help build a friendly office culture, which helps retain employees and, in turn attracts top talent. A positive attitude – especially when it comes to working with others – is essential since it fosters team harmony.

Adaptability:

The ability to adapt to change and a positive attitude about the change, go a long way towards growing a successful career. Employers need workers who can adapt to industry shifts and keep the company running.

Leadership:

Leadership is the ability to influence others and achieve a common goal. Bosses and managers are always looking for employees with leadership potential because such workers will one day take over the reins and build on the company’s legacy.

Problem Solving:

Decision making and problem solving is another skill that is high in demand. The ability to identify complex problems and review relatedinformation in order to develop and implement solutions, can distinguish one employee from another.

How to Be a More Engaged Employee

The struggle is real, folks. Employee engagement is on the decline, and it’s something every employer — and employee — needs to take seriously. According to Office Vibe’s Global & Real-Time State of Employee Engagement:

The statistics don’t lie: many employees are not engaged. But it’s not just on employers — I firmly believe that employee engagement is a two-way street.

Employers should be engaging with their employees to build meaningful relationships — at my company, we send out bi-weekly pulse surveys to gain regular feedback from our employees — but employees should also show some initiative to become a more engaged employee. Because odds are, becoming engaged will make your day-to-day life at the office a whole lot more enjoyable. It might even boost your work performance!

Having personally read through hundreds of comments submitted by employees, I’ve found myself providing some of the same tips and advice over and over again.

Below are my suggestions on how to become a more engaged employee.

Provide Feedback

How is a company supposed to fix a problem they aren’t aware exists? If your company is investing in surveys and feedback tools, the least you can do is engage and provide your thoughts and feedback. And if your organization does not have these tools, request them!

Transparency is expected in most organizations today. Let your employer know you don’t understand a certain policy or don’t agree with something. If you have a great suggestion, then share it! It doesn’t necessarily mean your new idea will be implemented, but at least you can have your voice heard and be a trusted source of feedback for your employer.

If you don’t speak up now, it’s hard to complain later. Just remember, feedback is nothing without honesty —  that’s what your employer is asking for!

Ask Questions

Question your employer. Not in a rude or “gotcha” fashion, but ask tough questions. I’ve found that when an employee asks a question, and I can provide context as to why a decision was made, it benefits all parties involved. Not only do you get your answers, but you show your employer that you’re invested in the company.

Set-up a regular meeting cadence with your manager — you can ask questions, talk about your performance and set career goals. These meetings don’t have to be long, but dedicating time from you and your manager’s calendar shows how important this meeting is to your success.

Become an Ambassador

You hear a lot today about employer branding (defined as a company’s ability to differentiate and promote its identity to a defined group of candidates that they’re interested in hiring). HR writer, speaker and advisor William Tincupsimply states employer branding is “your unique scent.”

There’s no one better to help share your company’s message than you — an employee of the company. Studies show time and time again that employees are viewed as more trustworthy than CEOs and/or marketing departments, and recommendations from friends and family always rank near the top with respect to trusted referral sources.

When your employer publishes a great blog post, share it with your network. At the next company event, take some fun photos and post them using the company’s branded hashtag. Being an employment brand ambassador will show employers you care about the company, and not just yourself.

Give Back

To give is better than to receive. Whether you’re talking about presents or philanthropy, this statement always rings true. Many companies are fully on board with social responsibility and giving back to the communities where their employees live, work and play.

If your organization sponsors and/or volunteers at these events, do yourself a favor and be present. Sometimes these charitable events are after hours or are on the weekends and not necessarily convenient. However, your attendance will not only impress your employer, but more often than not, will also enrich your life in more ways than one.

No one person, or even team, is responsible for employee engagement. Every employee at an organization adds to or takes away from the company culture. We spend a tremendous portion of our waking hours at work — why not be engaged while you’re there?

8 LinkedIn Profile Tips to Boost Your Job Search Efforts

Whether you’re actively seeking a new job or just keeping your career options open, it’s essential to have a stand-out LinkedIn profile. From searching for accounting and finance positions to finding roles in salesengineering, or IT, polishing up your LinkedIn presence is a pre-requisite to embarking on a job search in today’s digital hiring landscape.

Nearly 90 percent of recruiters use LinkedIn as a tool for candidate sourcing. If you’re not on LinkedIn or haven’t updated your LinkedIn profile in several years, you’re missing out on networking and career opportunities.  Get the most out of LinkedIn by optimizing your job search with these 8 LinkedIn profile tips.

 

1. Get Your Profile to All-Star Status

To optimize your LinkedIn profile, make sure all sections, including your recommendations and endorsements, are as complete as possible. LinkedIn makes this easy; on your profile, below your summary, you will see if you have what LinkedIn calls an “All-Star Profile.” If you don’t, LinkedIn will guide you through the process of adding to your profile until you do.

LinkedIn shares that people with All-Star Profiles are 40 times more likely to get contacted by recruiters than people without, so be sure to follow the recommendations.

 

2. Leverage Your Headline and Career Summary

Though your resume and LinkedIn profile overlap in several areas – education, work history, and skills – a key differentiator is your headline and summary. These sections are the most searched for and reviewed by recruiters and hiring managers.

On a traditional resume, page space often limits what you can say; however, on your LinkedIn summary, your story-telling space is ample – 2000 characters. Tell your career story by including explanations of your career history, changes, and aspirations. Why did you choose the previous roles or companies? What are you looking for next? For instance, did you move into sales after working as a software engineer? Are you an experienced financial accountant looking to transition into management? To increase how often your profile appears in recruiters’ searches, incorporate relevant keywords common in your line of work.

Unless you change it, your headline defaults to your current job title. This is, however, fully editable. Your headline will appear in recruiters’ search results, so you want to make sure it stands out. You have precisely 120 characters for your headline; make each one count. Unless you are an engineer at Google or Facebook, you don’t need to list your current employer. A better use of this space is to use relevant, descriptive keywords.

For example:
Poor Headline: Accountant for Nelson Jobs

Strong Headline: Senior-level accountant specializing in finance accounting, cost accounting, auditing, and financial controls

 

3. Loosen Up

Differentiate your resume from your LinkedIn profile by adopting a conversational rather than formal writing tone on LinkedIn. Though you want to avoid being too casual – LinkedIn still isn’t Snapchat, after all – you can lose the stuffiness associated with resumes by writing closer to the way you talk and avoiding overused clichés or buzzwords.

Striking the balance between promoting your skills and presenting yourself in a relaxed, engaging manner can be tricky. Have a professional friend proofread your profile to see if your tone is right. If not, consider hiring a professional resume writer or career coach to assist with this task.

 

4. Build up Your Skills, Endorsements, and Recommendations

For the best chance of being found by recruiters, beef up your LinkedIn skills section and request endorsements. A complete skills section can boost your search ranking, so add suggested keywords even if they are similar to skills you already have to appear in as many searches as possible. For example, if you are in sales, add account management, relationship building, lead generation, sales management, outside sales, inside sales, team leadership, management, etc. You are permitted to have up to 50 separate skills in this section, and LinkedIn assists you by suggesting related keywords.

The best way to get others to endorse your skills or to write a recommendation is to ask. Reach out to your colleagues and ask them to help! Be sure to offer endorsements and/or recommendations in return. If you’re uncomfortable asking, start by endorsing their skills. Be selective; only endorse a person for 2-3 skills you know are strengths of the person being endorsed. Endorsements can go an extra long way if a hiring manager or recruiter has a mutual connection that has endorsed your skills.

 

5. Actively Expand Your Network

Your LinkedIn profile is more than just a “LinkedIn resume.” It shows how well-connected you are. An important LinkedIn tip is to reach out and connect with others, including recruiters. LinkedIn prioritizes search results by displaying how people are connected to the person searching. By connecting to more people, you will have more 1st or 2nd connections and appear in more searches, increasing your odds of building a trusted relationship with a prospective hiring manager or recruiter.

Another good way to build rapport and expand your network is to join industry-specific Groups. Whether you’re looking for engineering and tech jobs, accounting and finance jobs, or sales and marketing positions, there are specific LinkedIn Groups you can join to network with others in your field. To get the most out of Groups:

  • Make sure Groups you join are still active. LinkedIn Groups aren’t as popular as they once were, so don’t spend time on groups that don’t have active discussions and members.
  • Focus on the value you can give rather than what you can get. By giving advice or serving as a resource to others looking to make connections, you increase the chances someone else will help you when you need a favor, too!
  • Message Group members directly. If you’re in the same Group as someone, you can message them directly even if they’re not a connection. Use this feature to build your network further.

 

6. Verify Your Settings

If you want your profile to be public and searchable by anyone, adjust your privacy settings accordingly. By using this LinkedIn tip, you allow recruiters and others who aren’t in your network to contact you. You may, however, receive unsolicited offers, so be prepared to handle those graciously. LinkedIn walks you through your settings, privacy, and visibility in their “help” section.

 

7. Claim Your Custom URL

Once you’ve created this custom URL, be sure to link to it wherever possible. Add it to your email signature or portfolio page, or provide it in your bio for events you attend or speak at. This will help your profile become more searchable both within LinkedIn and through Google. When a hiring manager searches for you by name and finds that your LinkedIn profile shows up near the top of Google, it will add to the positive perception of your personal brand.

 

8. Stay Active

The more active and engaged you are on the “professionals’ social media platform,” the better your presence becomes. Like and comment on others’ articles and posts. Share posts that are relevant to your industry or profession. Publish an article to share your knowledge and gain contacts organically while developing your own professional thought leadership brand. Another good way to get more engagement is to ask a thought-provoking, timely question about an article, resource, or trend.

Not only does staying active put your name in front of more people, it also helps LinkedIn and search engines understand that your profile is authoritative. This will help increase how often your profile appears in searches.

Follow these LinkedIn profile tips to make the most of your LinkedIn profile and best position yourself for your job search. While it should not be the only tool you use in your job search, LinkedIn can certainly play a valuable role in increasing your opportunities and helping you make a great impression.

Source: http://bit.ly/2lJaGUO

How to Show Culture Fit in an Interview!!

Ask a hiring manager which top qualities they’re looking for in candidates, and culture fit is bound to be up there. It’s no surprise — research shows that hiring for culture fit leads to reduced turnover, cost savings and happier, more productive employees, so it’s definitely in a company’s best interest to find somebody who’s a good match.

But job seekers are often at a loss for how to show culture fit during an interview.  And although it can indeed be difficult, it’s far from impossible — you just need to follow a few best practices first.

1. Do Your Homework

The first step in demonstrating culture fit is actually knowing what a company’s culture entails. According to Megan Nunan, Career Specialist at Ama La Vida, “Culture fit sums up all the ‘extras’ about a company that you can’t classify into one bucket. Things like do you align with their values, do you mesh well with those already hired at the firm, could you thrive in the current environment, etc.” Luckily, you can find much of this through your own research before the interview even rolls around.

“Look at what they post about on social media, look at pictures of the office and people working there. These will all give you clues as to what they value and what the company’s culture is like,” she says. “It also never hurts to ask around — if you know someone that either works at the firm or knows someone that works there, taking them out for a quick coffee could be the best investment you’ll ever make in yourself.”

2. Get Introspective & Rehearse

As you learn about a company’s values, work style, office environment, etc., you’ll want to think about how those match your own. Not only will this help you identify whether or not the company is the right fit for you — it’ll also give you an idea of what points you’ll want to touch on during an interview. For example, if you’re interviewing at a startup and you realize that you’re highly independent, self-motivated and excel at working at a fast pace, you’ll want to proactively highlight all of those factors in your answers.

In order to do that, you may want to research some of the most commonly asked interview questions and think about how you plan on answering them.

“There are an endless number of cultural fit questions like, ‘what kind of corporate environment do you thrive in, who was your best boss and why, what do you love about your current job,’” Nunan says. “The key to answering these successfully is to first take the time to reflect on the type of company culture that best suits you and then answer in a way that shows you’re intentional about your desire to work at this firm and that your values align nicely with those of the organization.”

And remember: the more you rehearse the answers to those questions (yes, I mean aloud!), the more comfortable you’ll be when it comes time for the actual interview.

3. Dress the Part

When you show up for an interview, you want your outfit to be appropriate — but remember, “interview-appropriate” will have different meanings at different companies.

4. Ask Questions

The idea of having to ask questions in an interview can be stressful — after all, shouldn’t answering their questions be enough? But really, you should think of it as an opportunity. It’s a great way to get a sense of how things operate day to day and, perhaps even more importantly, prove how you would fit in there.

5. Be Honest

Demonstrating culture fit is important, but even more important is finding a job and company that fit your life. After all, if you’re going to spend 40+ hours a week there, you’ll want to enjoy it.

The perfect job and company are out there somewhere, so don’t feel like you need to force it. Odds are, when you do find the right opportunity, you (and the interviewer) will know.