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Ways to impress a Recruiter on your next Job Interview

 7 Ways to impress a Recruiter on your next Job Interview

Morpheus Human Consulting
7 Ways to impress a Recruiter on your next job interview

    Recruiters and hiring managers have seen every trick and gimmick in the book when it comes to interviews. Sometimes they work – but when it comes down to it, whether you’re wearing purple stilettos stilettos or looking the interviewer in the eye, it’s the content of the interview that matters in the long run.


    So what can you do that will really impress a recruiter? Ace your next interview with these tips:

1.  Know your experience

    It’s amazing how many people stumble over what should be the easiest questions – you’re just talking about yourself! Look over your resume as you prep for the interview. Think about some of the most important projects you’ve worked on, what you liked and didn’t like about each job, and acknowledge some of the biggest challenges you’ve faced – and how you overcame them – in each role. Be ready to explain any “sketchy” details – leaving a job without another one lined up, gaps in work history, etc. You’ll have an easier time explaining and applying your experience when you know the basics like the back of your hand.

2.  Know the impact that your experience has had

    One of the best ways to impress a recruiter is to quantify the impact you had in previous roles. Recruiters want to hear about what you’ve done and how you did it, but understanding the big picture and the impact of your work is also important. Be prepared to answer questions about outcomes – maybe a monetary savings, increasing efficiency, or an improved customer experience – and how your work played a role. Sharing outcomes lets the recruiter know that you’re able to follow a project through from start to finish and understand the big picture.

3.  Apply your past experience to the job you’re interviewing for

    Take the challenges and outcomes you’ve already discussed and apply them to the role you’re interviewing for. It’s great to know what you’ve done, but applying that to what the company is currently doing is what will land you the job. Mention specific goals this position is intended to meet or qualities the organization is seeking (you can glean this information from the job posting as well as the initial phone screen) and discuss how you can use your skills to meet those requirements.

4.  Have a conversation

    More often than not recruiters expect candidates to do most of the talking in the interview, but in a perfect world, the interview would be a conversation between both parties – after all, you’re both trying to figure out if you’re right for each other. Find something in common with the interviewer, and do your research on the organization to come armed with the information you need. Straight Q&A sessions can get pretty boring for recruiters, so you’ll stand out if you can get the recruiter engaged in the conversation.

5.  Ask the right questions

    Keep the conversation flowing by asking questions that add value to the interview. Interview questions like these are great to ask in an early interview (i.e., your phone screening with a recruiter), but they don’t add a lot of value to the conversation in further rounds. Your interview questions should align more closely with what you already know about the job, and highlight the skills that you bring to the table.

6. Talk about the organization’s culture, and how you fit

Most organizations showcase their culture via their website or social media. Do they post funny sayings, or pictures of community events? Or do they stick strictly to product offerings and marketing communications? Investigate these sites thoroughly before your interview to get a sense of how casual or formal you will be expected to operate both in the interview and if you get the job. By better understanding the organization’s culture, you’ll be able to provide better examples of how you’ll be a fit for their team. Company culture questions like these are a great way to bring this up in the interview.

7.  Send a thoughtful follow-up note after your interview

    Pick out the most important points from your interview – whether it was something new you learned about the organization, a conversation topic where you really hit it off with the team, or a particular skill you might have forgotten to elaborate on – and send a short follow up within a day of your interview. You can use this note to remind them why you’re the best candidate for the role – based on your experience and your knowledge – not on tricks and gimmicks. Click here for tips and examples on how to write a job interview thank you letter.

Before  leaving don’t forget to check

Useful Tips to prepare for job interview 

Make your Resume Unique by following simple steps


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How to Setup a small business

Setting up a small business ? Read the following before you leave

Morpheus Human Consulting
Setting up a Small Business
    How to live the entrepreneurial dream by setting up  a small business while minimizing your risks and maximizing your success. (Warning: This ain’t easy.)

Starting a business is easy. You can do it in a day.

Starting a business that lasts is a lot harder, even if you put all your time and money into it. And the all-in approach is a lot riskier, since the more time and money you invest, the more you put at risk.

So if you haven’t yet taken the entrepreneurial plunge, how can you live your entrepreneurial dream while minimizing your risks and maximizing your chances of success?

Simple: Start your business–and keep your full-time job.

Except in rare cases, keeping a full-time job is the best approach for first-time business owners.

It’s also the hardest approach, since sacrifice, discipline, and a massive amount of hard work will be necessary. But that’s OK; if you aren’t willing to work hard and sacrifice, your new business will fail whether you keep your full-time job or not.

Here are six steps to minimizing risk while building a solid foundation for small business success:

1. Live like a college student.

Almost every business venture requires spending money before making money. (And if money isn’t required, time certainly is–and time is money.) Some small businesses take years to turn a profit.

A huge percentage of start-ups fail because they run out of money, and even if you do not, chronic money problems can lead to poor long-term decisions.

Never assume personal savings will see you through. Eliminate every bit of personal spending that isn’t necessary.

Before you start your business, cut all your personal expenses to the bone.

2. Work incredibly hard at your current job.

When small-business capital and cash flow are tight, losing your income is the last thing you can afford. Be a superstar. Work as hard and efficiently as possible. Get more done than anyone else you so you can leave on time without regret–and without raising concerns about your performance and dedication.

Work incredibly hard at your job so your evening and weekend time is yours, not your employer’s.

You’ll need it.

3. Set a daunting schedule.

When your “normal” work day ends, your start-up workday is just beginning.

Decide how many hours you think you can spend on your start-up every evening and add 25 to 50 percent.

Then commit to that schedule. Write it down, and if your schedule says you will work from 5.30 p.m. to 9 p.m. every evening, and from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekends, work those hours.

See the schedule you create for your start-up the same way you see your schedule for your current job–as non-negotiable.

Then work that schedule.

4. Ignore the temptation to whine about your daunting schedule.

Say you start a consulting business. Once you land a few clients you’ll be working every evening and most weekends.

That’s not a bad thing; it’s a good thing. Landing clients means you’re generating revenue.

You may have to get up early every day to take care of emails and voicemails before you head off to work. In large part your clients will choose your work hours for you.

Don’t whine. Don’t complain. Keep reminding yourself that having demanding clients is great because it means you actually have clients.

Resist the temptation to complain or feel sorry for yourself. Happily pay the price–it’s a price most other people won’t pay.

5. Be Ebenezer Scrooge.

At first you’ll be tempted to spend your profits. That’s natural.

Don’t. Reinvest every dollar you earn. Use profits to set up the business infrastructure you need (not the one you want, but the one you need). Buy supplies. Buy equipment you’ve been renting. Advertise. Or save cash to tide you through inevitable revenue downswings.

Don’t think of profits as income; think of profits as a tool to further establish your business.

6. Keep your full-time job longer than you want.

Deciding when to quit your job and go into business full-time is the hardest decision you will make.

It’s impossible to make an objective decision when you’re tired, stressed, sick of your full-time job, sick of your boss, or when you just want your life back.

But don’t quit too soon. When in doubt, hold out. Always focus on numbers, not emotions.

Your financials–personal and business–will tell you when it’s finally time to quit your job.

Before you leave don’t forget to check

Top 8 Useful tips to prepare for Job Interview 

and  Make your Resume Unique with 7  simple steps

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Very Useful Tips to prepare for Your Job interview

Top 8 Useful tips to prepare for Job Interview

Morpheus Human Consulting

    When you go for a job interview, it is very important that you are prepared and confident for it. It is necessary to be confident in a job interview so that you can deliver your best. Once you get a job, it will be easier for you to pay back your debts, especially if you are a fresh graduate and have a student loan on your shoulders. When you are sitting in front of a panel, which are ready to judge your every action and reaction, it is not easy to keep your cool. These are some tips that can help you to survive through an interview.

1.  Be prepared mentally

    It is important to think positive always and feel good about yourself. If you keep thinking about what will go wrong, you will automatically feel bad during the interview and lose the level of confidence that you have. In order to increase your self confidence you should remain quiet before an interview and think about positive things.


2.  Get prepared about the subject

    If you want to be confident for an interview, you have to know what you are doing. Prepare completely about the subject that you will be interviewed on. You should go through all the details of the subject but don’t be fanatic and over prepare. Once you are prepared with the subject you can answer questions with ease. You should be careful not to repeat memorised sentences. Your interviewers may thinks you are repeating sentences whose meaning you haven’t understood. Try and put ideas into your own words and be spontaneous.


3.  Be careful about your body language

    You should pay attention to your body language and make it impeccable. Your posture is what is going to show your level of confidence. You should sit straight and make eye contact when answering all questions which shows that you are confident and leaves a good impression.


4.  Have a friendly attitude

    It is important that you have a friendly attitude when you go for an interview. You should be gracious with every one whom you meet. Your employer may seek opinion of other people who meet at the interview site such as the receptionist in order to get an overall idea about your attitude. Arrogance won’t get you a long way.


5.  Make eye contact

    It is important that you maintain eye contact while answering questions of the interviewer. This will not only make you seem confident but also trustworthy.


6.  Shake hands

    After the interview is over, be sure to shake hands with the person who will be interviewing you. This leaves a positive impression on the interviewer and shows that you are interested to work there.


7.  Speak clearly

    Along with your posture, the way you speak is important in deciding whether you will get the job and creating an impression. If you speak in a low voice and be shy, then it can make your impression fall. You should speak in an energetic and lively voice which will sound good. You should also speak clearly so that the interviewer doesn’t have to give too much effort in understanding what you are trying to say.


8.  Don’t show an urge to get the job

    You should refrain from being overexcited or eager which gives the impression that you need to job badly. You should give out the impression that you have other chances of showing your skills and work out with the complete ability of yours. It is important that the company feels that they need you to do the job rather than the other way round. This will make the chances of you getting through the interview with flying colors higher.

Don’t Forget to check steps for making up a unique resume

Thus you can that the above 8 tips can help you to prepare for your interview in a complete manner and excel in it.


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Make your resume unique with these 7 simple steps


Make Your Resume Unique with these 7 Simple Steps


Here are some easy 7 tips to take your resume to the  unique level

    When applying for a job, you’re counting on your skills, experience, and your overall personality to help you land that coveted position. However, before you even get that chance to meet with a potential employer, you need to get a call for an interview. And you’re counting on your resume to convince a recruiter that you are worth the time for said interview.

    If you haven’t already figured it out, your resume is the key first step in helping you land your dream job. Your resume is what will get your foot in the door and land you the interview you need to secure the position you’re applying for. So, it’s crucial that you make sure your resume is spectacular before you send it off to a recruiter. To help you out, I’m sharing seven ways you make your resume stand out from the crowd and impress everyone who see it.
Following are the simple 7 steps to make your resume unique

1.  Tailor your resume to the job you’re applying for.

   The truth is, a generic resume that you send to every employer isn’t going to catch the eye of the recruiter who receives it. What they’re really hoping to see is a resume that has been tailored to the job at hand. They want to know that you’ve read their job listing and that you know exactly what they want in a potential employee. And you should tailor your resume to show off the skills and experience they’re looking for.

    While it may be time-consuming, it’s worthwhile to make a few tweaks to your resume before sending it off. Review the job listing for the position you’re applying to and figure out what the company is looking for in an employee. Determine what it is they value for members of their team. Make sure your resume shows that you have those skills so they’ll see that you’re a perfect fit. This is a key way to make your resume stand out since many applicants won’t be bothered to do this.

2.  Use industry keywords when appropriate.

   I hate to break it to you, but many recruiters aren’t going to take the time to read your resume in its entirety. This is especially true if you’re applying to a job at a large company that may receive hundreds of applications per job. Many of those companies will actually use a filtering system to scan your resume for certain keywords that they’re looking for.

3.  Use a header.

   If you really want to make your resume stand out, one great way to do that is by using a header. Use this space to include your name and contact information and also mention the specific position you’re applying for. It’s a simple, but effective, way to grab their attention! It also helps to bring the resume together and will give it a polished look.

4.  Back up your skills.

    One important section of your resume is without a doubt the section where you list your skills. In this space, you’ll want to focus on the skills that are most impressive to the employer you’re hoping to land a job with. However, while many people just list the skills they have, you can take it one step further.

    Back up your skills with proof. Instead of saying you helped the last company increase their sales by implementing a new marketing technique, state how much sales increased. This is a sure-fire way to impress every recruiter who sees your resume. Always remember to use metrics to back up the skills you possess so a recruiter sees you could potentially bring those same results to this position.

5.  Show how you’ve grown by telling a story.

   You’ve probably never thought to tell a story with your resume content, but it’s a great way to get results. You can use your resume as a way to showcase your experiences, your accomplishments, and the skills you have, but also make it clear how you’ve grown over the years. How have your skills developed as the years have gone on and as you’ve changed positions? Show that off and you’re sure to get a call for an interview!

6.  Add a cover letter to truly stand out.

   If a job application says to submit a resume, more often than not, people will just submit a resume. However, if you go the extra mile to submit a cover letter as well, a recruiter is going to be impressed. Add a cover letter to supplement your resume and to briefly expand on your skills. They will appreciate the extra time you took.

7.  Proofread before hitting send.

   Before you hit send on that resume, you need to take a couple extra minutes to read it through. You need to make absolutely certain that there are no errors. There shouldn’t be any spelling mistakes or grammatical errors. Keep an eye out for any kind of formatting errors as well.

    When you send a resume that’s riddled with typos and mistakes, it’s not going to impress anyone. And while this final step may seem simple, it’s one that many don’t take the time to do because they’re too impatient. To make your resume stand out, double-check for mistakes before sending it to recruiters.


How To Answer Behavioral Interview Questions

Behavioral job interview questions are based on the premise that past behavior is the best predictor of future behavior – and that’s why they are so often asked by employers when assessing candidates during a job interview.

These types of competency-based interview questions typically begin with the phrase, “Tell me about a time when…” – and if you’re able to understand the specific requirements of the role before your interview, you’ll be much better prepared to predict these kinds of questions and think about how you’ll answer them.


The golden rule when you’re answering behavioral interview questions is to adhere to what’s called the CAR principle: Context, Action, Result.

Context is about describing a situation and setting the scene for a relevant example. The key here is to choose your example well – one that clearly demonstrates the quality or skill the employer is asking about.

Action is about explaining what action you took. Be really specific rather than making vague statements and outline your steps and rationale.

Result is about detailing the outcome of your action. Offer specific facts relating to the result. For instance, quote figures and statistics that back up your declaration.

Remember these three steps to answering behavioral interview questions and you’ll be well on your way to thoroughly impressing your interviewer.


Q: Tell me about a time when you helped to turn around your team’s sales performance.

Context: “One of my previous employer’s sales divisions had been experiencing decreasing sales – so I was brought in to help reverse the situation. My challenge was to manage the team effectively so they were able to actually exceed (not just meet) their sales targets.”

Action: “Over a six-month period, I introduced several initiatives within the team, including: setting specific and measurable sales targets for each individual within the team; introducing weekly sales meetings for the team and for each individual within the team; and implementing a structured sales training program.

I also conducted market research to identify what our main competitors were doing, set up focus groups with major clients to establish key goals, and introduced a new remuneration system that linked sales performance to remuneration packages.”

Result: “We lifted sales by 60% and exceeded sales targets by 25% in the first quarter, and continued the upward trajectory throughout the next year.”


Your ability to answer behavioural interview questions can make or break your attempt to secure that dream job – so we’ve put together some sample behavioural interview questions to help you more adequately prepare.


“Give an example of a time when you were able to build rapport with someone at work, even in a stressful or challenging situation.”

“Tell me about a time when you had to give someone constructive criticism.”

“Give me an example of how you were able to use your ability to communicate and persuade to gain buy-in from a resistant audience.”


“Give me an example of a time when you had to cope with interpersonal conflict when working on a team project.”

“Tell me about a time when your fellow team members were de-motivated. What did you do to improve morale?”

“Describe a situation where others you were working with on a project disagreed with your ideas. What did you do?”


“Tell me about a difficult problem you were faced with, and how you went about tackling it.”

“Describe a time when you proactively identified a problem at work and were able to devise and implement a successful solution.”

“Have you ever faced a problem you could not solve?”


“Tell me about a situation in which you worked with team members to develop new and creative ideas to solve a business problem.”

“Describe the most creative work-related project you have completed.”

“Give an example of when your creativity made a real difference in the success of a product or project.”

Organisation and planning

“Have you ever managed multiple projects simultaneously? What methods did you use to prioritise and multi-task?”

“What specific systems do you use to organise your day?”

“Describe a time when you failed to meet a deadline.”

Analytical skills

“Describe a situation where you had to interpret and synthesise a large amount of information or data.”

“Give me an example of a recent roadblock and your logic and steps in overcoming it.”

“What was your greatest success in using logic to solve a problem at work?”


“Give an example that demonstrates your professional integrity.”

“Tell me about a time when you had to stand your ground against a group decision.”

“Have you ever had to work with, or for, someone who was dishonest? How have you handled this?”


“Describe some projects that were implemented and carried out successfully primarily because of your efforts.”

“What are three achievements from your last job that you are particularly proud of?”

“What has been your most rewarding professional accomplishment to date?”

By preparing yourself in advance and familiarizing yourself with these and other sample behavioral interview questions, you’ll be primed and ready for any number of behavioral questions that may come your way.


The 5 “Must Knows” of Job Interview Preparation

You’ve impressed an employer with your resume and they called you to schedule an interview. You’re ecstatic. Now, it’s time to get over the ecstasy and start preparing for the interview.

How do you prepare properly? Follow these five “must knows” of interview preparation:

Know Yourself. You got the interview, so you must have already communicated much of this in your resume and cover letter. Now, think about how you’ll describe yourself. What truly sets you apart from other candidates? What’s your “personal brand”? What are the strengths you bring to the job? Also, be prepared to answer typical and atypical interview questions. What are your career goals? Why do you want to leave your current employer? How can this job help you accomplish your career goals?

Know Your Resume. The interviewer has painted a mental picture of you by reading your resume and cover letter. Be sure you have a copy to refer to as you prepare for the interview. Since your resume should be targeted at the job description, you need to look for the parts they might ask questions about. For instance, you may have written about an accomplishment from a previous job that is not fresh in your mind but is critical to the position you’re seeking. So, jog your memory for some details that you can cite during the interview. recently asked about 3,000 hiring managers about interview blunders by job candidates, and 30% said “not offering specific answers to interview questions” was a common and detrimental gaffe.

Know the Company. Go into an interview without having researched the employer and your candidacy may well be dead before your seat turns warm. With all the information available on the web, and the rise in importance of networking, you have no excuse for not knowing important data about the company before you walk into the interview. Fortunately, we’re getting better at this, according to a recent Accountemps survey of senior executives with the nation’s largest companies. The survey found that about four of every five executives (79%, to be exact) said candidates either somewhat or very frequently demonstrate knowledge of companies during interviews. That’s up from 59% in 1997.

Know What You Want to Ask. Close to half (48%) of the CareerBuilder survey base named “appearing disinterested” as a common interview faux pas among candidates. To demonstrate your interest, prepare two lists: questions whose answers you need to know and another of what you want to know. Which questions go where? That depends on what you feel is crucial to deciding whether you might want to take the job if it’s offered.

Know Your Interviewers. If the hiring manager or would-be boss is interviewing you, get to know about them, namely, their managerial styles, how they might react in a hypothetical scenario, such as a pressing project deadline or an unexpected drop in revenue. If you know the names and roles of your interviewers ahead of time, find out about them through their bios on the company web site (if they’re available) or through a web search. Gain a sense of what it would be like working for and with these people.


5 Types of Decision Making Skills You Need To Know


Every workplace needs people with different types of decision making skills. All workplace decisions, both big and small, require a decision making process. Even if you do not realize it, you’re using some type of decision making process every day.


There are many different types of decision making processes, not all of which are explored here. For example, “Emotional” is a very common decision making process, used by people that make decisions based on how they feel.


There are some types of decision making that are both common and valued in the workplace. Those are the ones we’d like to highlight here.

The following are several examples of decision making, and an example of how you might use it in the workplace.

Intuitive – Intuitive is one of the simplest, and arguably one of the most common ways to make a decision. It should be noted that it is not always the best way. Intuitive decision making involves relying on the decision that feels right, without necessarily thinking about the logic that goes into that choice. An example may be deciding to use a software because you like it after a few minutes, rather than comparing it to other types of software and determining which is the better value.



Rational – Rational decision making is the type of decision making most people want to believe they do. It is the act of using logic to determine what is best, by reviewing all possible options and then evaluating each option using logic and rationality. An example would be listing out all possible marketing methodologies, along with budgets, data, and more, and then working out which one(s) would provide the best investment.



Satisficing – Satisficing is accepting the one that is satisfactory for the needs of the company. A non work example would be deciding you need coffee, and then going to the nearest coffee shop even if it’s not the best, simply because you get the job done. It means you may miss out on better options.



Collaborative – Collaborative is exactly as it sounds. Rather than make a decision yourself, you collaborate in some way to make the decision. An example might include meeting with others to get their input, voting on the final decision (although that may integrate other types of decision making models), or, otherwise relying on the group as a whole.



Combination – Not all decision making falls into a simple bucket. Many people use a combination of these different types of decision making styles. For example, rational and intuitive may be easily combined. The person doesn’t necessarily use any data, or create any logic charts, but they think about the decision from a logical perspective and then go with their gut on the final decision.



Understanding your preferred decision making style will help you prepare answers to interview questions.






Here is my article on the role of work experience in getting a student into a good MBA College.
Few common questions have been answered in this article.
Hope you find it useful.

So, is it advantageous to have work experience prior to commencing on the MBA journey? The question is straightforward but the answer is not. Duration, job role, industry/sector of work all contribute to the experience becoming an asset or a liability.


1.First things first- why MBA?

 Although the question might seem redundant, it is essential to understand the perspective of those already  having  jobs. Quitting a job and pursuing MBA would have the following cost implications:

  1. The existing flow of income would stop. Most flagship MBA courses in India are 2 years long. This would mean a gap of 2 years between the last and next pay cheques.
  2. A significant investment in course fees and living expenses. Many MBA students apply for educational loans, thereby creating financial obligations for the future.



2.What is the significance of the work experience in the MBA process?


  1. MBA entrance exams: It is tougher to prepare for MBA entrance exams in parallel with your job . Work means a break from academics coupled with a restricted amount of time for preparations. Consequently, those having jobs have to exhibit greater tenacity and focus to gear themselves for entrance tests.
  2. Selection into top colleges: This is one aspect where having work experience generally favours the applicant. IIM Bangalore, for example, has a 5% weightage for experience. Therefore, a person with experience can get through with a score lower than a fresher’s.
  3. The actual MBA coursework and campus life: Work experience obviously endows one with specialized domain knowledge. This practical perspective is useful in both theory-based coursework as well as projects based on market scenarios. Further, campus life provides a tremendous opportunity for personal growth. Those who have gone through the churn of corporate life appreciate this aspect better.
  4. The MBA jobs: Companies treat 0-18 months of work experience as a single category. Companies offer similar job profiles to these students. It is relevant to discuss the concept of ‘lateral placements’ here.



3.How Important is My College GPA After few Years of Work Experience?


With 3-5 years of work experience, you can present essay content that demonstrates the deepening and broadening of your professional skills and experiences, reinforcing the idea that you have matured into a highly effective and impactful young professional and that you are no longer defined by your undergraduate performance. Ideally, your GMAT score should be strong, which will also reinforce these ideas.

Strive to secure recommendation letters that emphasize this same message. Some candidates take business courses after college at a reputable institution, building an “alternative transcript” that provides evidence of their current abilities.



4.What do the Admissions Committees look for in a candidate’s Work Experience?


          3 Aspects Admissions Committees Look For In Work Experience

Think about the amount of time a B-school has in hand to judge your application… just 1 or at the most 2 hours to know who you are and what your potential is. In such a situation, your work experience comes to their rescue. AdComs turn to your work experience to quickly know what you have been doing over a period of time and what domain expertise you bring to the table.

  1. Pedigree of the company you worked with:

Are you working with Google or Microsoft? If yes, great! If not, no problem. This is because Admissions committees do understand that not everyone gets into a Google or a Microsoft. Yes, though it’s true that a big brand does leverage your chances of getting into your dream B-school, the good news is that even if you are working for a start-up, your application will not be rejected solely on this basis.

However, if you are working for a small brand, you should be able to quantify your performance, roles and responsibilities and precisely what value addition you brought to your employer.

  1. How well did you perform at work?

There is something even more important than the brand name of the company you work with and the number of years of experience you have.Now, is there any standard or norm to appraise this? Your performance is directly related to the number of promotions you got.

If you are able to show a couple of jumps, this adds a lot of weight to your application.


  1. Roles and Responsibilities:

You may be a great software engineer, doing a great job assigned to you.
However,Was your job restricted only to IT coding?
Or were you also involved in the cross-functional and cross-cultural roles?
For instance,
Did you work in other functions also such as pre-sales, functional consultancy etc?
Have you worked, studied or traveled abroad?
Even if you have not worked abroad, have you undertaken any such project where you had to deal with foreign parties?
Are you a person who can appreciate and work with people from other cultures?

Remember, this holds true for professionals belonging to other industries also, not just IT. It is very crucial that you provide precise quantifiable information that will demonstrate your initiative to take more challenges and responsibilities and show your excellence in these.




The straightforward answer is YES. Let me explain it to you with a real life example.

The whole idea of MBA is developing your Management and leadership skills and use them in real (mostly but not only business) world. Therefore you are supposed to study many business courses like Finance, Marketing, Economics etc in  a B School.

Now consider two individuals. One is fresher and the other one has a work ex of let’s say 5 years. The fresher let’s assume (and he will be) brilliant in academics and hence will grasp the concepts easily. However what do you actually mean by those concepts, how do they affect in day to day lives, that understanding cannot come without work experience.

For example – you want to become captain of a hockey team, first of all you need to play hockey and then only you can become a captain. Similarly if one becomes a Manager without work ex, he or she will be like a hockey captain who has been to a nice bschool but hasn’t played hockey ever.



5 Critical Mistakes that Could Destroy Your Career

This is that time of the year when many of us start to review our career; this usually starts with an audit of the past year — we review our goals, what we achieved and what we didn’t, and career highlights from the past year. It is then followed by setting resolutions and career goals for the new year. While there is nothing wrong with setting goals and making career resolutions for the new year, it is important that your career plans for this new year is made with a focus on one thing: mistakes to avoid.

If you want to achieve your career goals this year and have a much successful career than in previous years, you need to avoid these mistakes. Making one or more of them could destroy your career:

1. Ignoring Relationship With Co-Workers and Higher Ups

Most people wrongly assume that their career progression depends on their IQ and academic qualifications. This is very far from the truth. While these could have gotten you a job, you will need much more than that to have a progressive career.

According to Law Settlement Funding, “By far, one of the most important things if you want to move up in your career is to have a good relationship with your co-workers and superiors. In fact, this is often reported to be more important than other factors. If, on the other hand, you are not on good terms with co-workers and superiors and you think ‘it is just enough to do an excellent job,’ don’t be surprised if you are out of a job soon enough.”

2. Not Getting Enough Sleep

Many people sacrifice sleep in the belief that it is required to achieve their career goals and objectives. Not only is this not true, but it can be very dangerous. Besides the fact that lack of sleep has been linked to psychopathic behavior (and remember, not being able to get along well with employees and higher-ups can destroy your career), research actually shows that not getting adequate sleep does not necessarily give people the performance boost they assume they are getting. Instead, getting inadequate sleep (less than six hours daily for an adult) leads to the same effect as being drunk: it diminishes your performance and reduces your cognitive abilities.

So, if sleeping less is part of your plan to achieve your career goals, it could diminish your performance and reduce your cognitive abilities. It could also lead to you making career-damaging mistakes (since you could be operating on the same level as a drunkard).

3. Diversifying Instead of Focusing

While many will advocate “diversifying” as key to success, focus is what really makes a great career. Putting a lot of focused, undivided attention into being the best at what you do will lead to you having a stronger career than diversifying your efforts and energy into a lot of things. In fact, an analysis of the billionaires on the Forbes 400 list found that the majority of these billionaires got to where they are by being focused on one thing and reaching the peak of their career in the area of their focus. If you take a look at people at the top of your industry you will most likely notice the same thing.

“Diversifying” could limit your career trajectory. It could even destroy it. If you’re an accountant, for example, you will stand a better chance career-wise getting your CPA than learning to bake as a “side skill.”

4. Limiting Yourself by Not Networking

If you want to move forward in any industry, networking is the rule of the game: networking allows you to be aware of more opportunities, to connect to more people in your industry and to know about how things work beyond just your workplace.

Don’t make the mistake of limiting yourself by not networking — not only could it limit your growth potential, but it could make you redundant and potentially negatively affect your career prospects. Instead, network by attending industry conferences and events and connecting with people in other organizations similar to yours.

5. Not Being Careful About Your Social Life

Of course, it used to be that (for the most part!) what you do in your private life has little bearing on your career. Not anymore. In the age of social media and super fast information transmission, especially where most information posted online remain there permanently, not minding what you post on social media could not only cost you your current job, but it could also cost you future jobs and prevent you from moving forward in your career.

Being careful about what you post on social media should be paramount on the list of steps you take to advance your career — ignoring this rule could affect you beyond just this year. It can affect your career prospects forever.


8 Habits of Employees That Get Promoted

Getting a promotion takes more than just doing your job well. To move up the ladder to the next step if your career, you have to prove to decision makers and leadership that you are ready and deserving enough to take on more responsibility. This takes consistently working your best, staying dedicated to your work, and much more.

If you’re sick of being passed up for promotions, check out these eight habits of employees that get promoted. Make small changes as necessary if you’re ready to take the next step in your career.  

1. Set and Communicate Career Goals
Be goal-oriented

Before the start of the year, sit down with your boss to set and discuss your professional career goals. Be open about where you see yourself 6-months or a year. A good boss will help you achieve these goals by giving you opportunities to grow and provide support to keep you on track.

“In many cases, he or she truly does want to see you achieve your goals. As a manager myself, I constantly ask my employees ‘Where do you see yourself in five years?’—because if there’s a way I can help them along, I’ll do it. Whether that means putting in a good word for them in a different department at my current company or assigning them specials projects that will help them build new skill sets for a different role, I want to help,” says Katie Douthwaite Wolf, The Muse contributor.

They key, says Wolf, is to avoid announcing plans to “jump ship or that you want to take over your boss’s position.” Instead, think bigger and broader and come ready to discuss the ways you think your boss can help.

2. Always Be a Team Player
Be collaborative

Employers don’t like when employees are focused on “I” rather than “we.” They want team players who are committed to helping the greater good of the team, which ultimately benefits the company:

“A good employee volunteers his or her efforts before even being asked. They volunteer for more tasks and responsibility, and not just because of immediate reward,” according to the guide, How to be Promotable. “This type of employees simply goes above and beyond and will be the first thought of when promotions are being decided.”

3. Make Yourself Indispensable
Be irreplaceable

How can you make yourself an indispensable member of your team? One way is to become the go-to person for something specific, like designing dynamic sales decks to dealing with challenging customers. People in positions like this are not only sought after by coworkers, but also seen by leadership because they naturally stand out as someone people are always looking for.

4. Keep Learning
Take initiative

Show your boss that you’re committed to continuously improving and developing your skills by finding learning opportunities, both within the office and outside of it. This doesn’t mean you need to get your Masters or PhD, unless that’s relevant to your job. Instead, enroll in one webinar each month, use your own money to attend conferences, or ask to be put on projects outside of your department. This shows that you’re serious about your career, and aren’t waiting for someone else to get you where you want to go.

5. Document Your Success
Advocate for yourself

When asking for a promotion, leadership is going to want to know what kind of value you bring to the business. Rather trying to think back at all you’ve accomplished, build a “working” portfolio throughout the year. After you’ve completed an important project or performed a record sales month, document it. When noting your successes, focus on the most important details:

“Keep a record of everything you do that enhances the company’s bottom line, that puts the company or your department in a good light, that is creative and innovative, and that shows your loyalty and commitment to the organization,” says Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D.

This tracking shows that you’ve been successful and improved the company, and are invested in the work you’re doing.

6. Don’t Be Afraid to Take Charge
Show leadership potential

Do you display passion, trustworthiness, decisiveness and confidence? Possessing these types of leadership skills is essential for getting promoted. After all, the first step in being a leader is acting like one. Don’t get involved in office politics or develop bad habits, like being late or missing deadlines. Leaders need to be great role models for the employees they manage and work with, and without these skills, it will be hard to get a management promotion.

7. Network with the Right People
Stay connected

Take advantage of every networking opportunity you have, even if it’s a small get together with new co-workers at lunch. Networking with others within your organization and otherwise will allow you to get to know the people who can provide support now and in the future. It’s also a chance to promote yourself and your skills as well. You can reap similar benefits by getting involved with groups in your organization, like those who help plan events or keep the office stocked.

8. Be an engaged employee
Get involved

Being engaged goes beyond paying attention or taking notes in meetings—both of which are also important. It means being an active member of your organization, attending every optional  “Lunch and Learn” or coming up with new ideas for sharing successes in the workplace. This shows your commitment to the company and the success of your co-workers.

Get Promoted This Year

Getting promoted is not an easy task—it takes time, learning and dedication to yourself and the business. Successfully manage your own career path by using these eight tips—you might just get that promotion you’ve been hoping for.