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7 Ways to Get Recruiters & Job Offers to Come to You

Did you know that you don’t have to spend hour upon hour trying to find a job, and that you can do things that will have potential employers approaching you instead? Yes, this is a reality for many people, but it isn’t something that just happens. You have to work at it, and you need to market yourself in a way that is going to make you very desirable to potential employers. Today we are going to take a look at seven ways to get recruiters and job offers to come to you, instead of the other way around.

1. Start Networking

It is true that a lot of people aren’t hired because they filled out a job application or sent in a resume. They are hired because they have connections, people that they network with who are able to help them in their career search. Now is the time to get out there and network with everyone you know, from friends and family to former coworkers, employers, professors, etc. The more networking you can do, the better off you will be in the long run. Let everyone in your network know that you are looking for a job, and make sure that they are well aware of your education, skills, and experience. If they think you are a fit for a certain job, they won’t hesitate to recommend you.

2. Build Your Brand Online

“You are your own brand, and you need to build that brand and promote it as much as possible. It is important that you start building your brand online, because this is where employers are going to be looking for potential employees,” suggests Dima Midon, an expert from TrafficBox. Use all of the online tools at your disposal, particularly LinkedIn, which is a professional network that allows you to really promote yourself as a professional, and someone who is an expert in your field. This is a great tool for job seekers. Make sure that you keep your profile up to date, especially when it comes to contact information, so when an employer searches you, they will be able to contact you if they are interested in learning more.

3. Create a Professional Website

Let’s say that you have already applied for a job that you really want. The employer is going to want to learn as much about you as possible, and they are usually quite impressed when they see that candidates have their own professional websites. Your website is basically an extension of your resume, where you have the opportunity to really expand on your education, skills, experience, and knowledge. You can include samples of your past work, your portfolio, contact information, and a lot more. Make sure that your resume is up to date and included as its own separate section of your website, and also include your LinkedIn profile. Consider trying a platform like Squares peace to get started!

4. Keep on Applying for Jobs

Even if you are waiting for employers to start seeking you out, don’t stop applying for other jobs while you are waiting. After all, you could end up waiting for a long time, and you don’t want to be out of work and not able to pay your bills just because you are waiting for the perfect job to come along. Remember, most people who apply for jobs are rejected at least 15 times before they actually receive an offer of employment. Figure out what you have done wrong at the other interviews, and keep on applying until you get it right, and get the job offer you really want. The only real problem this is going to cause is that you could end up with several job offers, and have to decide which one you are the most interested in.

5. Dress for the Job

You may not have the job yet, but you should always be dressed as if you do. If you are interested in a certain type of profession, you should dress for that profession on a regular basis. Don’t run to the store looking sloppy. This could be just the time when you end up running into someone in your network, a potential employer, etc., and they are not going to see you at your absolute best. Another bonus to dressing for success is that the better you look, the better and more confident you are going to feel. It is particularly important to dress for the role when you are meeting employers for interviews, applying for jobs, etc. You need to look the part for every type of job you are interested in.

6. Don’t Badmouth Former Employers

The last thing a potential employer wants is an employee who badmouths their former employers. For one thing, no one likes to have someone around who is constantly complaining about something. You need to have a positive outlook, and as the saying goes, if you don’t have anything nice to say about someone, don’t say anything at all. One of the most common job interview mistakes that many people make is saying bad things about their former employers. Yes, you do have to be honest about why you are no longer employed by the company, but you need to find ways to put a positive spin on things.

7. Let Recruiters Know You are Open

Let’s get back to LinkedIn. It isn’t just enough to have a LinkedIn profile. You need to let recruiters that you are “open”. There are several ways that you can do this, including having your phone number and email address in the summary section (many recruiters don’t bother going any further than the summary, so you need to give them what they are looking for). Make sure your profile has a professional head shot photo. If you have a silly photo, or none at all, it is going to make potential employers think that you are not going to be professional and take your job seriously. Also, make sure that your profile is “on” so they know you are available.

Source: http://bit.ly/2EgrVWi  

7 Tips to Hire Best Candidates in 2018

 7 tips to hire best candidates in 2018

 

If you are a smart recruiter, then finding the right candidate for your organization is not hard to find. Hiring right talent – even in a competitive job market – becomes easy with well-thought out strategies. Top recruiters spend time formulating sound recruitment tactics which are both efficient and effective in procuring the best and the brightest employees. Here are some tips for hiring best candidates in 2018.

 

Use of Technology:

Technology plays a key role in improving the overall efficiency and effectiveness of the hiring process. Recruiters often use technology to select appropriate candidates, reach out to them easily and most importantly, fish the best out of the lot.

 

​Cross industry hiring:

Organisations are now looking for talent who can apply specialist knowledge in a generic industry. People who can use their experience to make a better tomorrow will be in demand and hence, cross industry hiring will receive a lot of fillip.

 

Power of review:

Employer review platforms – such as Glassdoor- offer an unbiased and clear picture to job seekers about their dream companies. The new generation of job-seekers extensively research prospective employers before they make a career move. Hence recruiters should pay attention to their employer brand and concerns surrounding it.

 

Use of analytics:

Today, recruiters are flooded with data pertaining to a variety of topics. This includes talent catchment, candidate preferences, performance of candidates on board, reasons why candidates refuse offers, and so on. Analytic support is becoming extremely crucial to decide which candidates to go after and how to keep them engaged.

 

Going social:

While job portals are the most preferred hiring medium for nearly 55% organisations, social media hiring is also gaining importance, revealed a recent study done. With significant penetration of Social Media – both in business and employees’ personal and professional lives – social networking is becoming a key source to tap diverse talent pool.

 

The mobile revolution:

More companies will develop apps that help schedule and record time and attendance, aid employee engagement, create digital to-do lists, productivity trackers and complete a range of other tasks. These apps will have the ability to access data stored in the cloud and be accessible from multiple devices. A smart recruiter must make use of these apps to save on time and resources.

 

Catch them young:

On the campus hiring front there has been a steady increase in the number of Pre-Placement Offers (PPOs). Year 2018 may see offers being rolled out to students who intern or do projects even in their second year of college. Hence keep a watch on the campus relevant to you.

 

 

 

 

Soft skills for successful career in 2018

Soft skills at Morpheus Consulting

What is it that truly differentiates one candidate from another during the job application process? While most candidates may have similar academic qualifications for a specific job, it is the soft skills and extracurricular activities that set one job aspirant apart from the others.

Soft skills are key to building relationships, gaining visibility, and creating more opportunities for advancement. These skills are not specific to one career but are generic across all employment sectors. Have a look at them here:

Communication:

Communication skills are perhaps the first set of skills that all potential employers notice. Employers look for people who cancommunicate well – both verbally and otherwise. Communication skills boost your performance because they help you put exact messaging forward.

Team Player:

Employers look to team players to help build a friendly office culture, which helps retain employees and, in turn attracts top talent. A positive attitude – especially when it comes to working with others – is essential since it fosters team harmony.

Adaptability:

The ability to adapt to change and a positive attitude about the change, go a long way towards growing a successful career. Employers need workers who can adapt to industry shifts and keep the company running.

Leadership:

Leadership is the ability to influence others and achieve a common goal. Bosses and managers are always looking for employees with leadership potential because such workers will one day take over the reins and build on the company’s legacy.

Problem Solving:

Decision making and problem solving is another skill that is high in demand. The ability to identify complex problems and review relatedinformation in order to develop and implement solutions, can distinguish one employee from another.

How to Be a More Engaged Employee

The struggle is real, folks. Employee engagement is on the decline, and it’s something every employer — and employee — needs to take seriously. According to Office Vibe’s Global & Real-Time State of Employee Engagement:

The statistics don’t lie: many employees are not engaged. But it’s not just on employers — I firmly believe that employee engagement is a two-way street.

Employers should be engaging with their employees to build meaningful relationships — at my company, we send out bi-weekly pulse surveys to gain regular feedback from our employees — but employees should also show some initiative to become a more engaged employee. Because odds are, becoming engaged will make your day-to-day life at the office a whole lot more enjoyable. It might even boost your work performance!

Having personally read through hundreds of comments submitted by employees, I’ve found myself providing some of the same tips and advice over and over again.

Below are my suggestions on how to become a more engaged employee.

Provide Feedback

How is a company supposed to fix a problem they aren’t aware exists? If your company is investing in surveys and feedback tools, the least you can do is engage and provide your thoughts and feedback. And if your organization does not have these tools, request them!

Transparency is expected in most organizations today. Let your employer know you don’t understand a certain policy or don’t agree with something. If you have a great suggestion, then share it! It doesn’t necessarily mean your new idea will be implemented, but at least you can have your voice heard and be a trusted source of feedback for your employer.

If you don’t speak up now, it’s hard to complain later. Just remember, feedback is nothing without honesty —  that’s what your employer is asking for!

Ask Questions

Question your employer. Not in a rude or “gotcha” fashion, but ask tough questions. I’ve found that when an employee asks a question, and I can provide context as to why a decision was made, it benefits all parties involved. Not only do you get your answers, but you show your employer that you’re invested in the company.

Set-up a regular meeting cadence with your manager — you can ask questions, talk about your performance and set career goals. These meetings don’t have to be long, but dedicating time from you and your manager’s calendar shows how important this meeting is to your success.

Become an Ambassador

You hear a lot today about employer branding (defined as a company’s ability to differentiate and promote its identity to a defined group of candidates that they’re interested in hiring). HR writer, speaker and advisor William Tincupsimply states employer branding is “your unique scent.”

There’s no one better to help share your company’s message than you — an employee of the company. Studies show time and time again that employees are viewed as more trustworthy than CEOs and/or marketing departments, and recommendations from friends and family always rank near the top with respect to trusted referral sources.

When your employer publishes a great blog post, share it with your network. At the next company event, take some fun photos and post them using the company’s branded hashtag. Being an employment brand ambassador will show employers you care about the company, and not just yourself.

Give Back

To give is better than to receive. Whether you’re talking about presents or philanthropy, this statement always rings true. Many companies are fully on board with social responsibility and giving back to the communities where their employees live, work and play.

If your organization sponsors and/or volunteers at these events, do yourself a favor and be present. Sometimes these charitable events are after hours or are on the weekends and not necessarily convenient. However, your attendance will not only impress your employer, but more often than not, will also enrich your life in more ways than one.

No one person, or even team, is responsible for employee engagement. Every employee at an organization adds to or takes away from the company culture. We spend a tremendous portion of our waking hours at work — why not be engaged while you’re there?

8 LinkedIn Profile Tips to Boost Your Job Search Efforts

Whether you’re actively seeking a new job or just keeping your career options open, it’s essential to have a stand-out LinkedIn profile. From searching for accounting and finance positions to finding roles in salesengineering, or IT, polishing up your LinkedIn presence is a pre-requisite to embarking on a job search in today’s digital hiring landscape.

Nearly 90 percent of recruiters use LinkedIn as a tool for candidate sourcing. If you’re not on LinkedIn or haven’t updated your LinkedIn profile in several years, you’re missing out on networking and career opportunities.  Get the most out of LinkedIn by optimizing your job search with these 8 LinkedIn profile tips.

 

1. Get Your Profile to All-Star Status

To optimize your LinkedIn profile, make sure all sections, including your recommendations and endorsements, are as complete as possible. LinkedIn makes this easy; on your profile, below your summary, you will see if you have what LinkedIn calls an “All-Star Profile.” If you don’t, LinkedIn will guide you through the process of adding to your profile until you do.

LinkedIn shares that people with All-Star Profiles are 40 times more likely to get contacted by recruiters than people without, so be sure to follow the recommendations.

 

2. Leverage Your Headline and Career Summary

Though your resume and LinkedIn profile overlap in several areas – education, work history, and skills – a key differentiator is your headline and summary. These sections are the most searched for and reviewed by recruiters and hiring managers.

On a traditional resume, page space often limits what you can say; however, on your LinkedIn summary, your story-telling space is ample – 2000 characters. Tell your career story by including explanations of your career history, changes, and aspirations. Why did you choose the previous roles or companies? What are you looking for next? For instance, did you move into sales after working as a software engineer? Are you an experienced financial accountant looking to transition into management? To increase how often your profile appears in recruiters’ searches, incorporate relevant keywords common in your line of work.

Unless you change it, your headline defaults to your current job title. This is, however, fully editable. Your headline will appear in recruiters’ search results, so you want to make sure it stands out. You have precisely 120 characters for your headline; make each one count. Unless you are an engineer at Google or Facebook, you don’t need to list your current employer. A better use of this space is to use relevant, descriptive keywords.

For example:
Poor Headline: Accountant for Nelson Jobs

Strong Headline: Senior-level accountant specializing in finance accounting, cost accounting, auditing, and financial controls

 

3. Loosen Up

Differentiate your resume from your LinkedIn profile by adopting a conversational rather than formal writing tone on LinkedIn. Though you want to avoid being too casual – LinkedIn still isn’t Snapchat, after all – you can lose the stuffiness associated with resumes by writing closer to the way you talk and avoiding overused clichés or buzzwords.

Striking the balance between promoting your skills and presenting yourself in a relaxed, engaging manner can be tricky. Have a professional friend proofread your profile to see if your tone is right. If not, consider hiring a professional resume writer or career coach to assist with this task.

 

4. Build up Your Skills, Endorsements, and Recommendations

For the best chance of being found by recruiters, beef up your LinkedIn skills section and request endorsements. A complete skills section can boost your search ranking, so add suggested keywords even if they are similar to skills you already have to appear in as many searches as possible. For example, if you are in sales, add account management, relationship building, lead generation, sales management, outside sales, inside sales, team leadership, management, etc. You are permitted to have up to 50 separate skills in this section, and LinkedIn assists you by suggesting related keywords.

The best way to get others to endorse your skills or to write a recommendation is to ask. Reach out to your colleagues and ask them to help! Be sure to offer endorsements and/or recommendations in return. If you’re uncomfortable asking, start by endorsing their skills. Be selective; only endorse a person for 2-3 skills you know are strengths of the person being endorsed. Endorsements can go an extra long way if a hiring manager or recruiter has a mutual connection that has endorsed your skills.

 

5. Actively Expand Your Network

Your LinkedIn profile is more than just a “LinkedIn resume.” It shows how well-connected you are. An important LinkedIn tip is to reach out and connect with others, including recruiters. LinkedIn prioritizes search results by displaying how people are connected to the person searching. By connecting to more people, you will have more 1st or 2nd connections and appear in more searches, increasing your odds of building a trusted relationship with a prospective hiring manager or recruiter.

Another good way to build rapport and expand your network is to join industry-specific Groups. Whether you’re looking for engineering and tech jobs, accounting and finance jobs, or sales and marketing positions, there are specific LinkedIn Groups you can join to network with others in your field. To get the most out of Groups:

  • Make sure Groups you join are still active. LinkedIn Groups aren’t as popular as they once were, so don’t spend time on groups that don’t have active discussions and members.
  • Focus on the value you can give rather than what you can get. By giving advice or serving as a resource to others looking to make connections, you increase the chances someone else will help you when you need a favor, too!
  • Message Group members directly. If you’re in the same Group as someone, you can message them directly even if they’re not a connection. Use this feature to build your network further.

 

6. Verify Your Settings

If you want your profile to be public and searchable by anyone, adjust your privacy settings accordingly. By using this LinkedIn tip, you allow recruiters and others who aren’t in your network to contact you. You may, however, receive unsolicited offers, so be prepared to handle those graciously. LinkedIn walks you through your settings, privacy, and visibility in their “help” section.

 

7. Claim Your Custom URL

Once you’ve created this custom URL, be sure to link to it wherever possible. Add it to your email signature or portfolio page, or provide it in your bio for events you attend or speak at. This will help your profile become more searchable both within LinkedIn and through Google. When a hiring manager searches for you by name and finds that your LinkedIn profile shows up near the top of Google, it will add to the positive perception of your personal brand.

 

8. Stay Active

The more active and engaged you are on the “professionals’ social media platform,” the better your presence becomes. Like and comment on others’ articles and posts. Share posts that are relevant to your industry or profession. Publish an article to share your knowledge and gain contacts organically while developing your own professional thought leadership brand. Another good way to get more engagement is to ask a thought-provoking, timely question about an article, resource, or trend.

Not only does staying active put your name in front of more people, it also helps LinkedIn and search engines understand that your profile is authoritative. This will help increase how often your profile appears in searches.

Follow these LinkedIn profile tips to make the most of your LinkedIn profile and best position yourself for your job search. While it should not be the only tool you use in your job search, LinkedIn can certainly play a valuable role in increasing your opportunities and helping you make a great impression.

Source: http://bit.ly/2lJaGUO

How to Show Culture Fit in an Interview!!

Ask a hiring manager which top qualities they’re looking for in candidates, and culture fit is bound to be up there. It’s no surprise — research shows that hiring for culture fit leads to reduced turnover, cost savings and happier, more productive employees, so it’s definitely in a company’s best interest to find somebody who’s a good match.

But job seekers are often at a loss for how to show culture fit during an interview.  And although it can indeed be difficult, it’s far from impossible — you just need to follow a few best practices first.

1. Do Your Homework

The first step in demonstrating culture fit is actually knowing what a company’s culture entails. According to Megan Nunan, Career Specialist at Ama La Vida, “Culture fit sums up all the ‘extras’ about a company that you can’t classify into one bucket. Things like do you align with their values, do you mesh well with those already hired at the firm, could you thrive in the current environment, etc.” Luckily, you can find much of this through your own research before the interview even rolls around.

“Look at what they post about on social media, look at pictures of the office and people working there. These will all give you clues as to what they value and what the company’s culture is like,” she says. “It also never hurts to ask around — if you know someone that either works at the firm or knows someone that works there, taking them out for a quick coffee could be the best investment you’ll ever make in yourself.”

2. Get Introspective & Rehearse

As you learn about a company’s values, work style, office environment, etc., you’ll want to think about how those match your own. Not only will this help you identify whether or not the company is the right fit for you — it’ll also give you an idea of what points you’ll want to touch on during an interview. For example, if you’re interviewing at a startup and you realize that you’re highly independent, self-motivated and excel at working at a fast pace, you’ll want to proactively highlight all of those factors in your answers.

In order to do that, you may want to research some of the most commonly asked interview questions and think about how you plan on answering them.

“There are an endless number of cultural fit questions like, ‘what kind of corporate environment do you thrive in, who was your best boss and why, what do you love about your current job,’” Nunan says. “The key to answering these successfully is to first take the time to reflect on the type of company culture that best suits you and then answer in a way that shows you’re intentional about your desire to work at this firm and that your values align nicely with those of the organization.”

And remember: the more you rehearse the answers to those questions (yes, I mean aloud!), the more comfortable you’ll be when it comes time for the actual interview.

3. Dress the Part

When you show up for an interview, you want your outfit to be appropriate — but remember, “interview-appropriate” will have different meanings at different companies.

4. Ask Questions

The idea of having to ask questions in an interview can be stressful — after all, shouldn’t answering their questions be enough? But really, you should think of it as an opportunity. It’s a great way to get a sense of how things operate day to day and, perhaps even more importantly, prove how you would fit in there.

5. Be Honest

Demonstrating culture fit is important, but even more important is finding a job and company that fit your life. After all, if you’re going to spend 40+ hours a week there, you’ll want to enjoy it.

The perfect job and company are out there somewhere, so don’t feel like you need to force it. Odds are, when you do find the right opportunity, you (and the interviewer) will know.

HR Interview Questions That You Must Be Ready For

Behavioral interview questions ask you to spill out as to how you have behaved in certain situations in the past. Your responses give the HR interviewer an insight into how you might respond to a similar situation in the future. A small mistake in answering these HR interview questions can cost you that job; here are three questions that you must be prepared for.

So what is your salary expectation?

This is the dreaded money question. In the best case scenario, you want to do whatever you can to keep your options open and get the hiring company to provide a salary range first. “Competitive” means you expect to be compensated fairly and this approach puts the money ball back in the interviewer’s court. The interviewers may very well keep pressing you. Follow-up questions could include “What does competitive mean to you?” or “What do you make now?”

If you feel you must name a figure, choose a salary range that provides some negotiation room, and it is fair based on market value in your industry and city, as thumb rule the top of the range should be a number that would make you very happy (within reason).

One of the likely answers for this HR Interview question that you can give is,  “I’m very interested in this position so that I would be open to any competitive offer.”

Can you please explain this gap on your resume.

The HR interviewers tend to review your resume carefully and will notice if you have bee out of work between positions, and this is often seen as a sign that one of your job stints didn’t go, as you would have planned for. The career break may be for reasons that may be beyond work performance; your ex-employer may have gone out of business, your division got restructured, etc.  However, unless you clarify the interviewers tend to assume that you were fired or left under unfavorable circumstances.

You May Also Like To Read: 10 Tricky HR Interview Questions & Their Answers

If you have a positive or neutral reason for the gap, go ahead and concisely explain it. If it was a layoff that was unrelated to your performance, make that amply clear. If you were let go or there was another potentially sensitive reason for your departure, you’ll have to tread a bit more carefully. The key is to keep your explanation crisp and then make an effort to move the conversation along to more positive topics.  In these cases, it’s widespread to get sidetracked into discussing the grisly details of the separation or criticizing your former bosses or coworkers. You must explain what happened in few words and make it clear it’s something that could never happen again. At all costs, you should try to avoid using the word “fired” if you can. Deflect the interviewer attention to your track record of jobs that ended well. If the gap between jobs was lengthy, you should also make it clear that you were keeping busy with up-skilling, volunteering for social work, or taking a break to do your hobby. This shows that you are proactive and energetic.

One of the likely answers that you can give for HR Interview question is,  “The job and I did not fit together. On the hindsight, I ignored my gut feeling and took the position because it was a very generous offer. I have learned a lesson and won’t remake the same mistake.  Apart from this slip-up, I have been very successful in all the roles that I have picked up.”

Tell me about a time when you had to work with someone difficult

This HR interview question is designed to test your ability to handle conflict and work with different personalities. This question puts you in a spot because it forces you to talk about someone who derailed your apple cart. You have to handle this HR Interview question diplomatically and avoid any sign of negativity of ill feeling. Step out of the zone and try to recollect a situation in which you managed to keep a positive professional relationship with a difficult coworker, manager, client or partner.  By answering this HR Interview question smartly, you can help the interviewer see your professionalism and ability to remain calm under pressure.

 

Source: http://bit.ly/2z9NCTu

Here’s What the Perfect Resume Looks Like

Resumes are essential to the job search, but let’s be honest: creating one is not exactly anyone’s idea of a good time. With so many conflicting pieces of advice, you might feel like you don’t know where to start or what to do. But don’t worry — this time, we’ve done the heavy lifting. We combed through some of our best resume advice and compiled it into one info graphic to give you an easy-to-follow outline for a resume that will wow recruiters and hopefully, land you the job of your dreams.

Ready for a resume revamp? Read on below!

1. Design Matters: Don’t go overboard with intricately decorated templates. Look for sufficient white space, margins of at least .7 inches, and a font size no smaller than 11 pt.

2. Be Reachable: Make it easy for recruiters to reach out to you by providing your contact info near the header.

3. Show Off Your Skills: Don’t make recruiters hunt for the most critical information on your resume — include a table of your key soft and hard skill sets up top. Make sure your highlighted skills show why you’re a good fit for the job — all the better if these are keywords from the job description.

4. List Your Experience: This section should include each company you’ve worked for, your title, the dates you worked there, and several bullet points that describe your key accomplishments and responsibilities.

5. Quantify Your Experience:  Whenever you can, use concrete data points — it helps provide recruiters with the scope and context of your work, and demonstrates how you contributed to the bottom line.

6. Include Other Positions: Don’t be afraid to include positions that aren’t directly related to the one you’re applying for, especially if you have limited work experience. You can still use it to demonstrate the skills and qualities you want highlighted.

7. Get the Grade: Many jobs require degrees or certifications, so make sure to list yours. GPA is optional, but may be worth including if you’ve graduated recently with high marks.

8. The Extra Stuff: Add some color to your resume with a short catch-all ‘Additional Experience’ section at the end. Include clubs/organizations, volunteer experience, awards you’ve won, and even interesting hobbies or activities.

9. Keep It Concise: Limit your resume to 1-2 pages at the most.

Source: http://bit.ly/2tUFGaB

10 MOST DEMANDED PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCIES BY COMPANIES

 

If you are looking for a job, you should definitely know which the most demanded professional competencies by companies are.

First of all, we should say that a competency is the capability to apply or use a set of related knowledge, skills and abilities required to successfully perform your tasks at work. Nowadays, as the number of offered candidates is continually growing (not to say that a lot of them has quite a similar academic profile), the keys to a proper recruiting process rely on revealing the inner competencies.

Here you will find the top 10 of most valued competencies when it comes to hiring the right employee:

Optimism: try to show an enthusiastic and always-willing-to-help attitude. Seeing tough situations with positivity is really valued on anyone.

Flexibility: show capacity to adapt to changes. Don’t just react, be prepared as things never stay the same.

Team work: it is really important to get along and bond with your colleagues. If you are a “team person” you should already know that great things can be accomplished when working in a strong and committed group.

Initiative: show that you want to learn, every day. Don’t wait for your superiors to always tell you what to do, show that you know your work and ask for help when needed.

Loyalty: simple, be loyal to your company and culture. If you don’t really trust who you are working for, you should rethink if it’s is the right place for you.

Leadership: can you take decisions? Do you continually motivate your team? Does people see you as a role model? Then you are a natural leader!

Communication skills: knowing how to communicate with superiors and equals is a great asset, but alone is not enough. You should be a good listener too and take every opinion into account.

Creativity: a creative person will bring new fresh ideas even when not asked to. Innovative and problem-solving are two of the abilities that comes with this competency.

Transparency: be honest and clear with your words.

Energy: give the most you can, every time.

Though you shouldn’t have all of these, and of course, each job will demand its own, remember to always highlight and show your professional competencies. This will help you get through your job interview and, if you are already working, to grow in the company.

 

 

Source: http://bit.ly/2BuCow1

Artificial Intelligence trends are HR realities

 

The emergence of Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies in the past years has profoundly impacted a tremendous number of companies and sectors. Take the example of supply chain functions – these have been completely reshaped and fully robotized warehouses are now the new standard. In parallel, other support or corporate functions have also caught this technological wave, but not with the same speed and pace. Human Resources today are the perfect illustration: the shift towards Digital HR has started for pioneer organizations, but the majority of companies are still in the reflection and conceptualization stages. On one hand, there is an overwhelming feeling related to the immensity of ‘the possible’ in terms of HR technology offerings, and on the other hand, there is a need to answer growing expectations from an evolving workforce.

Today, HR C-levels are facing a common main equation: Ensuring that HR roadmaps will become even more relevant in the C-suite and help streamlining organizations while improving the employee’s experience.

But how are AI technologies concretely impacting the HR community?

 

Beyond the reflection and conceptualization stages mentioned earlier, AI is clearly acknowledged as a critical component of the future HR service delivery model. Most of discussions today are about how to incorporate chatbots, robots or other cognitive solutions within Human Resources departments.

Just to name a few examples:

 

  • Robotic process automation (RPA) is a new norm today. Any process optimization exercise almost always considers robotic automation as a solution. In this context, almost all HR processes are subject to automation. The main recurring ones that we observe are related to recruitment, core HR administration, compensation, payroll and performance, but all HR processes that require significant manual input are candidates for automation.
  • Chatbots are also getting a lot of traction. For example, in the HR space, chatbots are replacing traditional FAQs. Cognitive chatbots can also be trained by humans in order to improve their correct answer rate. This is a real game changer and robust accelerator to change the employee experience.
  • Robots are less and less considered as exhibition gadgets and can now be found in some HR front office departments.
  • Voice assistants on mobile for any employee, anytime, anywhere are becoming more common – say hello to the new HR ‘Siri’. A vacation request for example can then be part of a quick phone conversation, instead of several less efficient transactions involving HR systems and emails.
  • What we are observing, is that AI technologies are becoming fully embedded within the HR community. The initial doubts and fears have been overcome by most HR professionals and AI is recognized as a real added value to the employee. The HR operating model shift is ongoing and we are only at the early stages as the technological change is evolving at an exponential speed. Tomorrow new Artificial Intelligence offerings will emerge and will continue to reshape HR departments.

Source: http://bit.ly/2zgAGyP