Employer Brand vs. Talent Brand: Why the Difference Matters

Maybe you’ve heard (or even used) the term “employer brand” without being completely sure what it means and how it’s different from the concept of “talent brand.” If so, I won’t tell anyone—and I’m here to help clear things up.

Coined in 1996, employer brand is a relatively new niche that falls under the larger umbrella of talent attraction. While talent brand and employer brand have some areas of overlap, these two terms have several key differences.

Most of those differences are tied to the voice of your potential hires, or your audience. Make no mistake, you have lots of audiences. In fact, I always say that there are at least three sides to every story. Let’s take a closer look at what makes these concepts distinct and why they’re both important to your business’s reputation as an employer.

The benefits and risks of employer branding

An employer brand is all about storytelling. It encompasses how you want your organization to be perceived and the specific messaging you use when sharing information about your company.

Companies have a great deal of control over their employer brand marketing, which can sometimes cause problems—like when multiple companies turn to the same messaging again and again. Do these phrases sound familiar?

  • Our people are our greatest asset.
  • We have amazing benefits and perks.
  • We offer career development and progression.
  • We’re the most innovative company in our space.

These seem like great claims at first, but after the 27th time a prospective employee hears the phrase “We have the best people,” it can start to lose meaning. This is what I like to call ‘Employer Branding.’

It makes matters worse if these claims turn out to be inaccurate, which happens more often than you might think. Even if an organization’s leaders mean well, they can develop a warped view of their employees’ experiences.

And when companies attempt to sell an inaccurate or inauthentic brand to potential employees, it could cost them in both the long-term and short-term when it comes to talent attraction, employee engagement and employee retention.

Your talent brand is forged by honest voices inside your organization

According to TalentBrand.Org*, your talent brand is “the honest story of life as an employee inside your organization, as told by the employees in parallel with the company.”

So how can you make sure your idea of your brand lines up with the reality of what employees are saying? That’s where a holistic view of your reputation comes in.

While your employer brand can be shaped and honed by your organization’s leaders, talent brand comes directly from employee experiences and feedback.

In other words, your talent brand is not what one website or channel says it is. Current, past and even prospective employees shape your talent brand through social media posts, review site comments, direct network conversations, face-to-face interactions and referrals.

On Indeed’s Company Pages, for example, you’ll learn what people are saying about your company’s culture, management, pay, benefits, work-life balance, job security and advancement opportunities.

This feedback from real employees provides a valuable touch point and reality check for company leaders who want to make sure their employer brand accurately reflects employee experiences. Again, this is just one piece of the Talent Brand puzzle that you need to examine.

The value in the overlap

Companies can get the most from their talent brand and employee brand identities when they consider these two concepts together. That’s why Indeed’s Company Pages feature employer-created videos and social feeds alongside reviews and ratings directly from employees.

How do I know which channels are important enough to monitor? I look at where I’m getting the biggest sources of candidate traffic.

Bringing these two types of branding together helps you visualize the overlap between the way you view your brand and how employees see your company. This area of overlap can shed new light on where the heart of your brand actually lives.

By focusing on the aspects of your brand that employees truly appreciate, you’ll get a stronger sense of which of your company’s unique perks and attributes you should amplify and share more widely, to attract the types of people you’re looking to hire.

And who knows? It may even mean you can swap out that “we have the best people” line for something that’s a much better fit.

Source: http://indeedhi.re/2zhPSgm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What Recruiters Want to See at Each Stage of the Interview Process

Everyone sort of prepares for their interviews the same way. They research the company theyre applying for and brush up on long-forgotten academic material. While this is a great start, its important to realize that recruiters and hiring managers have a vastly different set of criteria for what makes the perfect entry-level candidate than for what makes the ultimate executive. After all, the average day in the life of a second-year financial assistant is going to be far different from that of a CFO. 

For Entry-Level Employees

1. Dont be afraid to be afraid

 Recruiters arent demonic perfection seekers. They understand that entry-level job applicants will most likely be pretty new to this whole interviewing thing. If youre young and just starting off on your professional career, dont be too worried about showing some anxiety or a few jitters. In fact, during my career as a recruiter, many job applicants have outright professed to me at the start of their interviews that they were totally nervous. And you know what? I was totally fine with that, and other recruiters will be too.

2. Be prepared to talk about your college experience and your goals

At this point, you dont have too much work experience to talk about with your interviewers. Interviews can last as long as an entire day, so you can bet that your college experience and career goals will come up at some point. Failing to plan can often mean that you plan to fail, so go into the interview with a strong idea of what you want to say. It would be difficult to come up with a good response right on the spot to nebulous questions such as Where do you see yourself in 10 years?” or What about your college experience has prepared you the most for this job? 

3. Befriend the interviewer by showing your likable side

I hate to say it, but interviewers often care more about the likability of entry-level candidates than whether or not theyre actually qualified for the job. This is because the person interviewing you will often also be your future boss and mentor, so it makes perfect sense that they would want to hire someone whom they personally like and want to work with. A strong interview performance means establishing a strong connection with your interviewer. Try to show off your personality instead of just answering questions robotically. You can even get a bit personal if you’d like to.

4. Show that you are committed

 According to Julia Scott, a founding partner at Mock Interview, companies oftentimes lose money by hiring you – at least early on. They have to train you, and this requires time and effort from more senior employees who could be doing something else to benefit the company. On top of that, they need to pay you a yearly salary. So what companies are really hoping for is that youre committed to sticking around. That way, their efforts will be rewarded down the road once youve become a true asset to the company as opposed to a liability. This is why its super duper important to show interviewers that you are in it for the long haul.

For Mid-Level Employees

1. Emphasize your achievements at past jobs 

Youre no longer a wildcard. Youve been working for a number of years now so recruiters are going to be expecting you to tell them what youve managed to achieve over the course of your previous jobs. Conveying to your interviewer that you were an effective employee in the past is perhaps the most important message to get across, because this is one tell-tail sign that youll be an effective employee in the future as well.

2. Present your unique value proposition

Your past work experience should have molded you into an employee with a unique set of skills and capabilities that set you apart from other candidates.Now its up to you to bundle all of these valuable traits together and present them as your sales pitch on why you should be hired. Unlike the case with entry-level employees, interviewers are expecting mid-level employees to be able to start generating the company profits immediately upon arrival. 

3. Showcase your hard skills and technical expertise 

Mid-level job interviews de-emphasize soft skills and focus on what you can actually do as an employee. Those who show a superior technical proficiency will be the ones who edge out a win here. Even though your hard skills may already be listed on your resume and cover letter, you should be actively seeking opportunities during your interview to advertise the arsenal of skills youve acquired over the years. 

Its not enough to simply say that you know how to program in C++. Youve got to provide evidence that your C++ prowess is better than that of the next guy waiting in line to be interviewed. Try your best to bring up examples of the most impressive projects that youve completed in the past.

For Executive-Level Employees

1. Flaunt your leadership and management abilities 

senior-level employee is likely to be the manager of an entire team. While its still, of course, important to know the technical side the job, interviewers will test your hard skills far less than they will for job applicants at other levels of experience. In fact, with all your years of work experience, hiring managers often make the assumption that you already have complete mastery over the technical aspects of the job. Now the emphasis is placed on your ability to lead and coordinate others in doing the work you once did in the past. 

2. Explain your vision

Its all about the big picture. Often times, companies want to bring on a seasoned executive who has the vision necessary to steer them in a new and better direction. The person sitting across from you is going to want to know what that new direction is and where it will take the company. Not only do you need to clearly explain to the interviewer your vision and overall game plan, you may also need to give reasons for why your approach is superior to alternatives that other job candidates may propose. 

3. Show how you can increase the companys bottom line today

This should be one of your main selling points. How are you going to improve the companys bottom line once hired? While describing your vision and goals is one thing, its another to present numerical data and facts that support the notion that youll be able to ultimately increase the companys net income. Many candidates can seem quite wishy-washy when explaining their ideas, so always be sure to bring things back to dollar terms.

 

Top 7 Job Interview Mistakes

interview mistakes

Appearing Uninterested

You should be attentive not only with your physical appearance but intellectually also. Taking actively part in a conversation, sitting up straight and being kind to the receptionist all these things are counted when you appear somewhere for interview process. Also make sure you are not interrupting the interviewer with your query. Save it till the interviewer doesn’t complete his part of speech.

Take Good Time before answering the question

Interviewer wants to understand your knowledge in the short span of time so you need to think before you speak. Many candidates jump to the first thing they think of because they feel like they need to respond at the earliest. And blurting out anything that comes out first in your mind is not always a good option.

Bad Mouth about Previous Employers

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Recruitment Process Outsourcing Benefits

recruitment-process-outsourcing

Many organizations are still unfamiliar with the word RPO – Recruitment Process Outsourcing. Some companies are not aware of the fact that there are options to improve the recruiting process while some others are stuck with some other solutions because that’s how their boss want to recruit for their companies and missing out something that is more efficient. In fact, now-a-days more and more companies are using RPO to recruit positions which are bound to affect the performance and productivity of the organization. Finding the right people at this point of time becomes crucial for the company and hence to opt RPO is the best solution.

Advantages of Recruitment Process Outsourcing

Stronger Quality of hires

As the global market has become quite competitive it becomes difficult for the organization to search the qualified candidates or improve their internal recruiting for the same. Thus the main aim of the RPO is to provide best talent to its clients. RPO invest their time and energy to source, screen and present the cream resumes to the clients from the pool of CV’s

Cost Reduction

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