5 Types of Decision Making Skills You Need To Know

 

Every workplace needs people with different types of decision making skills. All workplace decisions, both big and small, require a decision making process. Even if you do not realize it, you’re using some type of decision making process every day.

 

There are many different types of decision making processes, not all of which are explored here. For example, “Emotional” is a very common decision making process, used by people that make decisions based on how they feel.

 

There are some types of decision making that are both common and valued in the workplace. Those are the ones we’d like to highlight here.

The following are several examples of decision making, and an example of how you might use it in the workplace.

Intuitive – Intuitive is one of the simplest, and arguably one of the most common ways to make a decision. It should be noted that it is not always the best way. Intuitive decision making involves relying on the decision that feels right, without necessarily thinking about the logic that goes into that choice. An example may be deciding to use a software because you like it after a few minutes, rather than comparing it to other types of software and determining which is the better value.

 

 

Rational – Rational decision making is the type of decision making most people want to believe they do. It is the act of using logic to determine what is best, by reviewing all possible options and then evaluating each option using logic and rationality. An example would be listing out all possible marketing methodologies, along with budgets, data, and more, and then working out which one(s) would provide the best investment.

 

 

Satisficing – Satisficing is accepting the one that is satisfactory for the needs of the company. A non work example would be deciding you need coffee, and then going to the nearest coffee shop even if it’s not the best, simply because you get the job done. It means you may miss out on better options.

 

 

Collaborative – Collaborative is exactly as it sounds. Rather than make a decision yourself, you collaborate in some way to make the decision. An example might include meeting with others to get their input, voting on the final decision (although that may integrate other types of decision making models), or, otherwise relying on the group as a whole.

 

 

Combination – Not all decision making falls into a simple bucket. Many people use a combination of these different types of decision making styles. For example, rational and intuitive may be easily combined. The person doesn’t necessarily use any data, or create any logic charts, but they think about the decision from a logical perspective and then go with their gut on the final decision.

 

 

Understanding your preferred decision making style will help you prepare answers to interview questions.

Source: http://bit.ly/2ExTcqp 

8 Habits of Employees That Get Promoted

Getting a promotion takes more than just doing your job well. To move up the ladder to the next step if your career, you have to prove to decision makers and leadership that you are ready and deserving enough to take on more responsibility. This takes consistently working your best, staying dedicated to your work, and much more.

If you’re sick of being passed up for promotions, check out these eight habits of employees that get promoted. Make small changes as necessary if you’re ready to take the next step in your career.  

1. Set and Communicate Career Goals
Be goal-oriented

Before the start of the year, sit down with your boss to set and discuss your professional career goals. Be open about where you see yourself 6-months or a year. A good boss will help you achieve these goals by giving you opportunities to grow and provide support to keep you on track.

“In many cases, he or she truly does want to see you achieve your goals. As a manager myself, I constantly ask my employees ‘Where do you see yourself in five years?’—because if there’s a way I can help them along, I’ll do it. Whether that means putting in a good word for them in a different department at my current company or assigning them specials projects that will help them build new skill sets for a different role, I want to help,” says Katie Douthwaite Wolf, The Muse contributor.

They key, says Wolf, is to avoid announcing plans to “jump ship or that you want to take over your boss’s position.” Instead, think bigger and broader and come ready to discuss the ways you think your boss can help.

2. Always Be a Team Player
Be collaborative

Employers don’t like when employees are focused on “I” rather than “we.” They want team players who are committed to helping the greater good of the team, which ultimately benefits the company:

“A good employee volunteers his or her efforts before even being asked. They volunteer for more tasks and responsibility, and not just because of immediate reward,” according to the guide, How to be Promotable. “This type of employees simply goes above and beyond and will be the first thought of when promotions are being decided.”

3. Make Yourself Indispensable
Be irreplaceable

How can you make yourself an indispensable member of your team? One way is to become the go-to person for something specific, like designing dynamic sales decks to dealing with challenging customers. People in positions like this are not only sought after by coworkers, but also seen by leadership because they naturally stand out as someone people are always looking for.

4. Keep Learning
Take initiative

Show your boss that you’re committed to continuously improving and developing your skills by finding learning opportunities, both within the office and outside of it. This doesn’t mean you need to get your Masters or PhD, unless that’s relevant to your job. Instead, enroll in one webinar each month, use your own money to attend conferences, or ask to be put on projects outside of your department. This shows that you’re serious about your career, and aren’t waiting for someone else to get you where you want to go.

5. Document Your Success
Advocate for yourself

When asking for a promotion, leadership is going to want to know what kind of value you bring to the business. Rather trying to think back at all you’ve accomplished, build a “working” portfolio throughout the year. After you’ve completed an important project or performed a record sales month, document it. When noting your successes, focus on the most important details:

“Keep a record of everything you do that enhances the company’s bottom line, that puts the company or your department in a good light, that is creative and innovative, and that shows your loyalty and commitment to the organization,” says Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D.

This tracking shows that you’ve been successful and improved the company, and are invested in the work you’re doing.

6. Don’t Be Afraid to Take Charge
Show leadership potential

Do you display passion, trustworthiness, decisiveness and confidence? Possessing these types of leadership skills is essential for getting promoted. After all, the first step in being a leader is acting like one. Don’t get involved in office politics or develop bad habits, like being late or missing deadlines. Leaders need to be great role models for the employees they manage and work with, and without these skills, it will be hard to get a management promotion.

7. Network with the Right People
Stay connected

Take advantage of every networking opportunity you have, even if it’s a small get together with new co-workers at lunch. Networking with others within your organization and otherwise will allow you to get to know the people who can provide support now and in the future. It’s also a chance to promote yourself and your skills as well. You can reap similar benefits by getting involved with groups in your organization, like those who help plan events or keep the office stocked.

8. Be an engaged employee
Get involved

Being engaged goes beyond paying attention or taking notes in meetings—both of which are also important. It means being an active member of your organization, attending every optional  “Lunch and Learn” or coming up with new ideas for sharing successes in the workplace. This shows your commitment to the company and the success of your co-workers.

Get Promoted This Year

Getting promoted is not an easy task—it takes time, learning and dedication to yourself and the business. Successfully manage your own career path by using these eight tips—you might just get that promotion you’ve been hoping for.

Source: http://bit.ly/2E7LL98 

How to Be a More Engaged Employee

The struggle is real, folks. Employee engagement is on the decline, and it’s something every employer — and employee — needs to take seriously. According to Office Vibe’s Global & Real-Time State of Employee Engagement:

The statistics don’t lie: many employees are not engaged. But it’s not just on employers — I firmly believe that employee engagement is a two-way street.

Employers should be engaging with their employees to build meaningful relationships — at my company, we send out bi-weekly pulse surveys to gain regular feedback from our employees — but employees should also show some initiative to become a more engaged employee. Because odds are, becoming engaged will make your day-to-day life at the office a whole lot more enjoyable. It might even boost your work performance!

Having personally read through hundreds of comments submitted by employees, I’ve found myself providing some of the same tips and advice over and over again.

Below are my suggestions on how to become a more engaged employee.

Provide Feedback

How is a company supposed to fix a problem they aren’t aware exists? If your company is investing in surveys and feedback tools, the least you can do is engage and provide your thoughts and feedback. And if your organization does not have these tools, request them!

Transparency is expected in most organizations today. Let your employer know you don’t understand a certain policy or don’t agree with something. If you have a great suggestion, then share it! It doesn’t necessarily mean your new idea will be implemented, but at least you can have your voice heard and be a trusted source of feedback for your employer.

If you don’t speak up now, it’s hard to complain later. Just remember, feedback is nothing without honesty —  that’s what your employer is asking for!

Ask Questions

Question your employer. Not in a rude or “gotcha” fashion, but ask tough questions. I’ve found that when an employee asks a question, and I can provide context as to why a decision was made, it benefits all parties involved. Not only do you get your answers, but you show your employer that you’re invested in the company.

Set-up a regular meeting cadence with your manager — you can ask questions, talk about your performance and set career goals. These meetings don’t have to be long, but dedicating time from you and your manager’s calendar shows how important this meeting is to your success.

Become an Ambassador

You hear a lot today about employer branding (defined as a company’s ability to differentiate and promote its identity to a defined group of candidates that they’re interested in hiring). HR writer, speaker and advisor William Tincupsimply states employer branding is “your unique scent.”

There’s no one better to help share your company’s message than you — an employee of the company. Studies show time and time again that employees are viewed as more trustworthy than CEOs and/or marketing departments, and recommendations from friends and family always rank near the top with respect to trusted referral sources.

When your employer publishes a great blog post, share it with your network. At the next company event, take some fun photos and post them using the company’s branded hashtag. Being an employment brand ambassador will show employers you care about the company, and not just yourself.

Give Back

To give is better than to receive. Whether you’re talking about presents or philanthropy, this statement always rings true. Many companies are fully on board with social responsibility and giving back to the communities where their employees live, work and play.

If your organization sponsors and/or volunteers at these events, do yourself a favor and be present. Sometimes these charitable events are after hours or are on the weekends and not necessarily convenient. However, your attendance will not only impress your employer, but more often than not, will also enrich your life in more ways than one.

No one person, or even team, is responsible for employee engagement. Every employee at an organization adds to or takes away from the company culture. We spend a tremendous portion of our waking hours at work — why not be engaged while you’re there?

10 MOST DEMANDED PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCIES BY COMPANIES

 

If you are looking for a job, you should definitely know which the most demanded professional competencies by companies are.

First of all, we should say that a competency is the capability to apply or use a set of related knowledge, skills and abilities required to successfully perform your tasks at work. Nowadays, as the number of offered candidates is continually growing (not to say that a lot of them has quite a similar academic profile), the keys to a proper recruiting process rely on revealing the inner competencies.

Here you will find the top 10 of most valued competencies when it comes to hiring the right employee:

Optimism: try to show an enthusiastic and always-willing-to-help attitude. Seeing tough situations with positivity is really valued on anyone.

Flexibility: show capacity to adapt to changes. Don’t just react, be prepared as things never stay the same.

Team work: it is really important to get along and bond with your colleagues. If you are a “team person” you should already know that great things can be accomplished when working in a strong and committed group.

Initiative: show that you want to learn, every day. Don’t wait for your superiors to always tell you what to do, show that you know your work and ask for help when needed.

Loyalty: simple, be loyal to your company and culture. If you don’t really trust who you are working for, you should rethink if it’s is the right place for you.

Leadership: can you take decisions? Do you continually motivate your team? Does people see you as a role model? Then you are a natural leader!

Communication skills: knowing how to communicate with superiors and equals is a great asset, but alone is not enough. You should be a good listener too and take every opinion into account.

Creativity: a creative person will bring new fresh ideas even when not asked to. Innovative and problem-solving are two of the abilities that comes with this competency.

Transparency: be honest and clear with your words.

Energy: give the most you can, every time.

Though you shouldn’t have all of these, and of course, each job will demand its own, remember to always highlight and show your professional competencies. This will help you get through your job interview and, if you are already working, to grow in the company.

 

 

Source: http://bit.ly/2BuCow1

Tips To Clear The Internship Interview With Flying Colors

Getting placed in good company for internship goes a long way in building your career, it gives you a head start. Here are few questions that will help you in clearing the HR interview round for securing a dream internship role.

Why do you want to intern with us?

As a golden rule, you must, research the company and the internship description before stepping in the interview, so that you can speak intelligently about why it appeals to you. The best answer to this question will go beyond talking about what you are looking for and gives them insight into your specific ability/ skills that prepares you to do great work in the internship role

Sample interview Answer:

“I have always been awed by your company and my marketing professors tell me that your internship program is one of the best in the service industry. Our college alumni’s tell me that your interns get an opportunity to do a lot of hands-on field marketing work. Marketing is one of my greatest strengths and I stand in the top ten students in the service marketing elective, hence I firmly believe I can make a valuable contribution during my internship stint.”

How will this internship help you meet your career goals?

By asking this question during the internship interview, the interviewer is probing to learn more about your careergoals.  He is looking for more information on these areas

  1. Do you have a clear idea of the next steps in your career path?
  2. Do your career goals fit with what the internship offers?
  3. Your knowledge and understanding of the internship position.
  4. Whether you have you done your research to understand the organisation and the internship program?

Though this question is about you and your goals, make sure that you are not coming across as self-centered. Weave your answer to show how it will be a win-win situation for both you and the company if you are selected for the internship role.

Sample interview Answer:

“Thanks a lot for asking me this question, this internship stint would give me an opportunity to gain some very valuable hands-on experience in the manufacturing industry. My goal is to find a full-time position as a production assistant on the shop floor, after my graduation next April. By working with your company, I will get an opportunity to work in a smart factory with some of the best minds. As a fresher, I am ready to work hard and work on any assignment in the Production division that adds value to the company and my career experience.”

I am sure you would have made some tough academic choices; tell me about it?

Through this question, the internship interviewer is trying to understand how you think, how you make decisions, and how you operate under pressure. Through this question, the interviewer is trying to see how you might respond in a similar situation while working for them. For this question, choose a real life academic situation in which you utilised your smart decision-making skills and it led to the positive outcome.

Sample interview Answer:

“In the early days of my career year, I accidently bumped into seniors who were doing doctoral research in Machine Learning. The first year curriculum for engineering was very heavy, leaving me with little or no time, and the doctoral student would have completed his thesis by the time I would have gone into the second year. I am a state level badminton player, I decided to skip my sports sessions for a year and spend the evening time, assisting The Doctoral student as a research assistant. I knew that my long-term career path would be in Machine learning and I wanted to learn as much as possible early on. I had to work hard and give up a lot of social activities over the last year, but I know I made the right decision and I am currently on track to publish a research paper on ML.”

Tell me more about our industry?

The interviewer is asking you this question to test your industry knowledge; they are not expecting a monologue on the history of the industry.  They are keen to see if you know about the latest industry trends, what are three-four big challenges facing the industry and what are the new innovations that could shape the industry in times to come.

I am curious to know, how did you choose your college and this stream?

Through this question, the internship interviewer is going to gauge how you have approach decision-making and your educational goals and priorities. In case you are applying for an internship that is not closely related to your field of study, be ready to explain as to why you are making a changeover and how your curriculum gives you the leeway to do this role. As a spin to throw you off guard, it is common for the internship interviewer to follow up by asking you whether you feel you made the right choice. Keep off from negativity about your college or your stream.

Source: http://bit.ly/2zf0cnY

QUALITIES THAT HR IS LOOKING IN NEW HIRES

QUALITIES THAT HR IS LOOKING IN NEW HIRES

Here are the some key qualities That HR look out in the new hires to ensure longevity of the tenure.

  1.  Endurance:

Turnovers can be expensive for HR. Hence the foremost qualities they look for in new hires are endurance, commitment and prospect of longevity of the tenure.

  1.  Team player:

Anybody can work in silos but it takes a lot of perseverance and high levels of patience and gratitude to work as a team player. Incidentally, all these qualities make for a good employee itself.

  1.   Ambitious:

Motivated and self-driven people are an asset to any organization. Ambitious employees work hard and try to surpass their own excellence, which in turn benefits the organization at large. Who doesn’t want to hire such employees?

  1.   Trustworthy:

Trust is a very tricky characteristic to identify in an employee. An employee who is true in his/her work and dependable is sure to have long-term benefits for the organizations and is most likely to stick around for long.

  1.    Positive attitude:

They say, if you have a positive attitude in life you are a sure winner. Organizations look out for such employees because they know such employees can stand up to failure and competition with much confidence.

  1.  Multi-tasking skills:

Businesses often resort to cost cutting by having fewer employees who can multi-task. With growing competition, multi-tasking is one of the desired quality HR looks for in new hires.

Preparing For A Phone Interview? Four Tips To Keep Top Of Mind

You made it past the initial resume screening and are scheduled for a phone interview. It’s easy to overlook this step in the process, but remember, if you don’t do well here, the chances of getting to the next step in the hiring process are next to nil. The person conducting the interview is either going to put their stamp of approval on you as a candidate or send you a rejection letter. Ace this step and you may even gain an ally in the hiring process.

Here are a few dos (and don’ts) to make sure you get the face-to-face interview.

1. Make sure you set aside time so there’s no conflict.

Set up a quiet place where you can have a candid conversation without risk of intrusion. As an interviewer, I always ask a candidate prior to starting if it’s still a good time for them. Recently, I have gotten responses like:

• “Hang on, let me go outside. I’m at a restaurant.”

• “Sure, I’m in the car driving so I may cut out, but go ahead.”

• “I may have to put you on hold if someone like my boss comes into the office.”

• “If you don’t mind the (kids, pets, etc.) making noise…”

The truth is, if you can’t set aside the time to talk about a career move to my company, I will assume you are not taking the job seriously or respecting my time. Why would I want you to join our team? If there is a conflict, let your interviewer know ahead of time so you can reschedule.

2. Do a little research.

You are almost guaranteed to be asked the question, “What do you know about our company and/or this role?” If you are not prepared to answer this, your interviewer is going to lose interest in you quickly.

While it’s the interviewer’s job to learn enough about your background and skill set, your job should be to learn enough about the company and the role to see if you want to move to the next step. They’ve read your resume, done some background research on you and have a set of questions tailored to what they have already learned. You should be equally prepared.

Spend some time Googling the company, and read their website to learn the core business and know their competitors. Take a look at LinkedIn and get a better understanding of their general organization. Once you have done this, make a list of key questions you want answers to. Have those ready during the phone interview so you’re not improvising.

3. Remember to be professional.

One of the things I like to do is get people to let their guard down. But over the phone, it is easy to fall into the trap of becoming too casual. You would be surprised at what folks say over the phone once they get too comfortable.

I cannot tell you how many times a candidate has dropped a swear word or used an inappropriate phrase. This only makes your interviewer wonder whether you will do this with clients, co-workers or other leaders who would interview you if they were to move you ahead.

Talk to the interviewer as if you were in their office. Envision yourself at the conference table with them. A neat trick is to pull up their profile on LinkedIn so you have their photo in front of you while you interview. It will help you stay focused. In this case, a picture is worth more than 1,000 words!

4. Be prepared to close.

When the interview is over, be sure to ask about next steps. Leaving the phone interview with an ambiguous ending is a sure recipe for not moving ahead. Not indicating that you want a next step is also telling.

Even if you need to dictate what the next step is, be sure it’s mutually agreed upon. For example, “This was a great conversation, but I would like to talk it over with my spouse. I will get back to you by Tuesday.” Similarly, you should expect to hear, “We’ll be interviewing several candidates and will get back to you by Tuesday to let you know if we are moving you ahead.”

Think of your phone interview as a low-stress, initial opportunity for you and the company to get to know each other. Don’t torpedo your chances of getting hired because you exemplified your weaknesses over your strengths.

Employer Brand vs. Talent Brand: Why the Difference Matters

Maybe you’ve heard (or even used) the term “employer brand” without being completely sure what it means and how it’s different from the concept of “talent brand.” If so, I won’t tell anyone—and I’m here to help clear things up.

Coined in 1996, employer brand is a relatively new niche that falls under the larger umbrella of talent attraction. While talent brand and employer brand have some areas of overlap, these two terms have several key differences.

Most of those differences are tied to the voice of your potential hires, or your audience. Make no mistake, you have lots of audiences. In fact, I always say that there are at least three sides to every story. Let’s take a closer look at what makes these concepts distinct and why they’re both important to your business’s reputation as an employer.

The benefits and risks of employer branding

An employer brand is all about storytelling. It encompasses how you want your organization to be perceived and the specific messaging you use when sharing information about your company.

Companies have a great deal of control over their employer brand marketing, which can sometimes cause problems—like when multiple companies turn to the same messaging again and again. Do these phrases sound familiar?

  • Our people are our greatest asset.
  • We have amazing benefits and perks.
  • We offer career development and progression.
  • We’re the most innovative company in our space.

These seem like great claims at first, but after the 27th time a prospective employee hears the phrase “We have the best people,” it can start to lose meaning. This is what I like to call ‘Employer Branding.’

It makes matters worse if these claims turn out to be inaccurate, which happens more often than you might think. Even if an organization’s leaders mean well, they can develop a warped view of their employees’ experiences.

And when companies attempt to sell an inaccurate or inauthentic brand to potential employees, it could cost them in both the long-term and short-term when it comes to talent attraction, employee engagement and employee retention.

Your talent brand is forged by honest voices inside your organization

According to TalentBrand.Org*, your talent brand is “the honest story of life as an employee inside your organization, as told by the employees in parallel with the company.”

So how can you make sure your idea of your brand lines up with the reality of what employees are saying? That’s where a holistic view of your reputation comes in.

While your employer brand can be shaped and honed by your organization’s leaders, talent brand comes directly from employee experiences and feedback.

In other words, your talent brand is not what one website or channel says it is. Current, past and even prospective employees shape your talent brand through social media posts, review site comments, direct network conversations, face-to-face interactions and referrals.

On Indeed’s Company Pages, for example, you’ll learn what people are saying about your company’s culture, management, pay, benefits, work-life balance, job security and advancement opportunities.

This feedback from real employees provides a valuable touch point and reality check for company leaders who want to make sure their employer brand accurately reflects employee experiences. Again, this is just one piece of the Talent Brand puzzle that you need to examine.

The value in the overlap

Companies can get the most from their talent brand and employee brand identities when they consider these two concepts together. That’s why Indeed’s Company Pages feature employer-created videos and social feeds alongside reviews and ratings directly from employees.

How do I know which channels are important enough to monitor? I look at where I’m getting the biggest sources of candidate traffic.

Bringing these two types of branding together helps you visualize the overlap between the way you view your brand and how employees see your company. This area of overlap can shed new light on where the heart of your brand actually lives.

By focusing on the aspects of your brand that employees truly appreciate, you’ll get a stronger sense of which of your company’s unique perks and attributes you should amplify and share more widely, to attract the types of people you’re looking to hire.

And who knows? It may even mean you can swap out that “we have the best people” line for something that’s a much better fit.

Source: http://indeedhi.re/2zhPSgm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What Recruiters Want to See at Each Stage of the Interview Process

Everyone sort of prepares for their interviews the same way. They research the company theyre applying for and brush up on long-forgotten academic material. While this is a great start, its important to realize that recruiters and hiring managers have a vastly different set of criteria for what makes the perfect entry-level candidate than for what makes the ultimate executive. After all, the average day in the life of a second-year financial assistant is going to be far different from that of a CFO. 

For Entry-Level Employees

1. Dont be afraid to be afraid

 Recruiters arent demonic perfection seekers. They understand that entry-level job applicants will most likely be pretty new to this whole interviewing thing. If youre young and just starting off on your professional career, dont be too worried about showing some anxiety or a few jitters. In fact, during my career as a recruiter, many job applicants have outright professed to me at the start of their interviews that they were totally nervous. And you know what? I was totally fine with that, and other recruiters will be too.

2. Be prepared to talk about your college experience and your goals

At this point, you dont have too much work experience to talk about with your interviewers. Interviews can last as long as an entire day, so you can bet that your college experience and career goals will come up at some point. Failing to plan can often mean that you plan to fail, so go into the interview with a strong idea of what you want to say. It would be difficult to come up with a good response right on the spot to nebulous questions such as Where do you see yourself in 10 years?” or What about your college experience has prepared you the most for this job? 

3. Befriend the interviewer by showing your likable side

I hate to say it, but interviewers often care more about the likability of entry-level candidates than whether or not theyre actually qualified for the job. This is because the person interviewing you will often also be your future boss and mentor, so it makes perfect sense that they would want to hire someone whom they personally like and want to work with. A strong interview performance means establishing a strong connection with your interviewer. Try to show off your personality instead of just answering questions robotically. You can even get a bit personal if you’d like to.

4. Show that you are committed

 According to Julia Scott, a founding partner at Mock Interview, companies oftentimes lose money by hiring you – at least early on. They have to train you, and this requires time and effort from more senior employees who could be doing something else to benefit the company. On top of that, they need to pay you a yearly salary. So what companies are really hoping for is that youre committed to sticking around. That way, their efforts will be rewarded down the road once youve become a true asset to the company as opposed to a liability. This is why its super duper important to show interviewers that you are in it for the long haul.

For Mid-Level Employees

1. Emphasize your achievements at past jobs 

Youre no longer a wildcard. Youve been working for a number of years now so recruiters are going to be expecting you to tell them what youve managed to achieve over the course of your previous jobs. Conveying to your interviewer that you were an effective employee in the past is perhaps the most important message to get across, because this is one tell-tail sign that youll be an effective employee in the future as well.

2. Present your unique value proposition

Your past work experience should have molded you into an employee with a unique set of skills and capabilities that set you apart from other candidates.Now its up to you to bundle all of these valuable traits together and present them as your sales pitch on why you should be hired. Unlike the case with entry-level employees, interviewers are expecting mid-level employees to be able to start generating the company profits immediately upon arrival. 

3. Showcase your hard skills and technical expertise 

Mid-level job interviews de-emphasize soft skills and focus on what you can actually do as an employee. Those who show a superior technical proficiency will be the ones who edge out a win here. Even though your hard skills may already be listed on your resume and cover letter, you should be actively seeking opportunities during your interview to advertise the arsenal of skills youve acquired over the years. 

Its not enough to simply say that you know how to program in C++. Youve got to provide evidence that your C++ prowess is better than that of the next guy waiting in line to be interviewed. Try your best to bring up examples of the most impressive projects that youve completed in the past.

For Executive-Level Employees

1. Flaunt your leadership and management abilities 

senior-level employee is likely to be the manager of an entire team. While its still, of course, important to know the technical side the job, interviewers will test your hard skills far less than they will for job applicants at other levels of experience. In fact, with all your years of work experience, hiring managers often make the assumption that you already have complete mastery over the technical aspects of the job. Now the emphasis is placed on your ability to lead and coordinate others in doing the work you once did in the past. 

2. Explain your vision

Its all about the big picture. Often times, companies want to bring on a seasoned executive who has the vision necessary to steer them in a new and better direction. The person sitting across from you is going to want to know what that new direction is and where it will take the company. Not only do you need to clearly explain to the interviewer your vision and overall game plan, you may also need to give reasons for why your approach is superior to alternatives that other job candidates may propose. 

3. Show how you can increase the companys bottom line today

This should be one of your main selling points. How are you going to improve the companys bottom line once hired? While describing your vision and goals is one thing, its another to present numerical data and facts that support the notion that youll be able to ultimately increase the companys net income. Many candidates can seem quite wishy-washy when explaining their ideas, so always be sure to bring things back to dollar terms.

 

Top 7 Job Interview Mistakes

interview mistakes

Appearing Uninterested

You should be attentive not only with your physical appearance but intellectually also. Taking actively part in a conversation, sitting up straight and being kind to the receptionist all these things are counted when you appear somewhere for interview process. Also make sure you are not interrupting the interviewer with your query. Save it till the interviewer doesn’t complete his part of speech.

Take Good Time before answering the question

Interviewer wants to understand your knowledge in the short span of time so you need to think before you speak. Many candidates jump to the first thing they think of because they feel like they need to respond at the earliest. And blurting out anything that comes out first in your mind is not always a good option.

Bad Mouth about Previous Employers

Read More