5 Phrases To Close Your Cover Letter & Land The Interview

Writing a cover letter isn’t an easy task for many job seekers. There’s a lot of pressure because, sometimes, the cover letter is the only piece the recruiter will read. Therefore, your cover letter must be a piece of writing that describes your achievements and how you will help the company succeed.

Additionally, you want your cover letter to illustrate how you are the best fit for the company and for the reader to believe you have the qualifications they seek. If you want to land an interview with your cover letter, you don’t want to sound vague or wishy-washy. Your cover letter should illustrate why you are the best fit and how you will help the company or organization reach success.

However, when writing the closing paragraph of your cover letter, it’s easy to have a passive voice because you don’t want to appear overconfident. For example, if you say, “I look forward to hearing from you,” that’s great — but that alone doesn’t seal the deal. The closing paragraph of your cover letter must be one of the strongest elements because it is the last impression you leave in the reader’s mind.

Here are five phrases to include in the final paragraph of your cover letter that will help you seal the deal for your next interview:

1. “I am very excited to learn more about this opportunity and share how I will be a great fit for XYZ Corporation.” Strong cover letter closings are enthusiastic and confident. You want the reader to have the impression you are truly passionate about the position and working for their company. This statement will also illustrate your ability to fit into the company culture and how your personality and work ethic is exactly what they’re looking for.

2. “I believe this is a position where my passion for this industry will grow because of the XYZ opportunities you provide for your employees.” It’s always a good idea to explain what you find attractive about working for the company and how you want to bring your passions to the table. By doing this, you can illustrate how much thought you dedicated to applying for the position and how much you care about becoming a part of the company.

3. “If I am offered this position, I will be ready to hit the ground running and help XYZ Company exceed its own expectations for success.” By adding this piece to your conclusion, you will be able to add some flare and excitement to your cover letter. The reader will become intrigued by your enthusiasm to “hit the ground running.” Employers look for candidates who are prepared for the position and are easy to train. Therefore, this phrase will definitely raise some curiosity and the reader will want to discover what you have to offer for their company.

4. “I would appreciate the opportunity to meet with you to discuss how my qualifications will be beneficial to your organization’s success.” Remember, you want to make it clear in your cover letter how the employer will benefit from your experience and qualifications. You want to also express how your goal is to help the organization succeed, not how the position will contribute to your personal success.

5. “I will call you next Tuesday to follow up on my application and arrange for an interview.” The most essential part of your closing is your “call to action” statement. Remember, the purpose of your cover letter is to land an interview. Don’t end your cover letter saying you’ll hope to get in touch. Explain to the reader the exact day and how you will be contacting them. When you state you will be following up with the employer, make sure you do it!

Remember, the closing of your cover letter is the most important element that will help you land your next interview. By crafting a strong, confident, and enthusiastic closing paragraph, you will leave the reader feeling like you could be the best candidate for the position.

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What Recruiters Want to See at Each Stage of the Interview Process

Everyone sort of prepares for their interviews the same way. They research the company theyre applying for and brush up on long-forgotten academic material. While this is a great start, its important to realize that recruiters and hiring managers have a vastly different set of criteria for what makes the perfect entry-level candidate than for what makes the ultimate executive. After all, the average day in the life of a second-year financial assistant is going to be far different from that of a CFO. 

For Entry-Level Employees

1. Dont be afraid to be afraid

 Recruiters arent demonic perfection seekers. They understand that entry-level job applicants will most likely be pretty new to this whole interviewing thing. If youre young and just starting off on your professional career, dont be too worried about showing some anxiety or a few jitters. In fact, during my career as a recruiter, many job applicants have outright professed to me at the start of their interviews that they were totally nervous. And you know what? I was totally fine with that, and other recruiters will be too.

2. Be prepared to talk about your college experience and your goals

At this point, you dont have too much work experience to talk about with your interviewers. Interviews can last as long as an entire day, so you can bet that your college experience and career goals will come up at some point. Failing to plan can often mean that you plan to fail, so go into the interview with a strong idea of what you want to say. It would be difficult to come up with a good response right on the spot to nebulous questions such as Where do you see yourself in 10 years?” or What about your college experience has prepared you the most for this job? 

3. Befriend the interviewer by showing your likable side

I hate to say it, but interviewers often care more about the likability of entry-level candidates than whether or not theyre actually qualified for the job. This is because the person interviewing you will often also be your future boss and mentor, so it makes perfect sense that they would want to hire someone whom they personally like and want to work with. A strong interview performance means establishing a strong connection with your interviewer. Try to show off your personality instead of just answering questions robotically. You can even get a bit personal if you’d like to.

4. Show that you are committed

 According to Julia Scott, a founding partner at Mock Interview, companies oftentimes lose money by hiring you – at least early on. They have to train you, and this requires time and effort from more senior employees who could be doing something else to benefit the company. On top of that, they need to pay you a yearly salary. So what companies are really hoping for is that youre committed to sticking around. That way, their efforts will be rewarded down the road once youve become a true asset to the company as opposed to a liability. This is why its super duper important to show interviewers that you are in it for the long haul.

For Mid-Level Employees

1. Emphasize your achievements at past jobs 

Youre no longer a wildcard. Youve been working for a number of years now so recruiters are going to be expecting you to tell them what youve managed to achieve over the course of your previous jobs. Conveying to your interviewer that you were an effective employee in the past is perhaps the most important message to get across, because this is one tell-tail sign that youll be an effective employee in the future as well.

2. Present your unique value proposition

Your past work experience should have molded you into an employee with a unique set of skills and capabilities that set you apart from other candidates.Now its up to you to bundle all of these valuable traits together and present them as your sales pitch on why you should be hired. Unlike the case with entry-level employees, interviewers are expecting mid-level employees to be able to start generating the company profits immediately upon arrival. 

3. Showcase your hard skills and technical expertise 

Mid-level job interviews de-emphasize soft skills and focus on what you can actually do as an employee. Those who show a superior technical proficiency will be the ones who edge out a win here. Even though your hard skills may already be listed on your resume and cover letter, you should be actively seeking opportunities during your interview to advertise the arsenal of skills youve acquired over the years. 

Its not enough to simply say that you know how to program in C++. Youve got to provide evidence that your C++ prowess is better than that of the next guy waiting in line to be interviewed. Try your best to bring up examples of the most impressive projects that youve completed in the past.

For Executive-Level Employees

1. Flaunt your leadership and management abilities 

senior-level employee is likely to be the manager of an entire team. While its still, of course, important to know the technical side the job, interviewers will test your hard skills far less than they will for job applicants at other levels of experience. In fact, with all your years of work experience, hiring managers often make the assumption that you already have complete mastery over the technical aspects of the job. Now the emphasis is placed on your ability to lead and coordinate others in doing the work you once did in the past. 

2. Explain your vision

Its all about the big picture. Often times, companies want to bring on a seasoned executive who has the vision necessary to steer them in a new and better direction. The person sitting across from you is going to want to know what that new direction is and where it will take the company. Not only do you need to clearly explain to the interviewer your vision and overall game plan, you may also need to give reasons for why your approach is superior to alternatives that other job candidates may propose. 

3. Show how you can increase the companys bottom line today

This should be one of your main selling points. How are you going to improve the companys bottom line once hired? While describing your vision and goals is one thing, its another to present numerical data and facts that support the notion that youll be able to ultimately increase the companys net income. Many candidates can seem quite wishy-washy when explaining their ideas, so always be sure to bring things back to dollar terms.

 

6 tips to dress professionally for an interview

Tips for job interview

 

When you go for a job interview, you make your first contact with your potential employer and it’s always best for you to give them a great first impression. Here are some tips that you can use to look professional and confident when you go for your interview.

Feel comfortable

You should wear your attire that you are comfortable with. This will prevent you from twitching on your seat that makes you and your interviewee look uncomfortable. So wear something lose that let you feel light.

Limit Jewelry

Not just women, but even men should limit wearing swaying earrings, loud bracelets and other unnecessary accessories that might cause distraction. Flashy jewelry will also be a distraction for the recruiter to keep eye contact with you

Don’t overuse perfume.

It’s good to smell fresh and attractive. But don’t over use perfumes or deodorant which will let you be that unwanted standout person in the room. The recruiters shouldn’t remember you for having that distinct smell.

Hide your piercings and tattoos

Tattoos and piercing are the latest trend among young adults. However, it doesn’t show a professional character when you apply for a job. It is better if you have any markings covered and made invisible to your employer.

Have a back up

It’s always good to have a backup shirt just in case you happen to get some dirt, sauce or some stain while you are on your way to your interview. Even if you plan not to take the public transport or not to have a meal before your interview, you might still be prone to have an accident because of someone else.  You don’t want to be in those commercials!

Look good, feel great

Have a shower, comb your hair, and look as if you are going on a date with a celebrity. You shouldn’t always rely on deos to cover up your smell. Also don’t forget to have some mints before you walk in.

Ask if you are not sure

If you are not sure what you should wear for your interview, don’t be afraid to ask your employer. It doesn’t give out any negative impression about you and you don’t end up having a dilemma on what you should be wearing that morning for your interview.

What to do after Job Interview?

What to do after Job Interview

 So, the job interview is over

Did your interview go well or not, the worst thing you can do is nothing at all. It’s always important to be prepared for any possible outcome – and do the most you can to boost your chances. To help turn your potential post-interview stress into a positive attitude that could help land your dream job, here are some of our top tips on what to do after a job interview:

Follow up, but don’t be impatient

Do follow-up with a telephone call to the employer within a week to ten days (or sooner, if the employer had a shorter timetable) to ask about the position. And do continue to build rapport and sell your strengths during the phone call.

Take notes on what worked, and what didn’t work.

A great interview might tempt you to put your job search on a shelf and move on with your personal life. You should have some time to write down what did, or did not, go well in your interview. Evaluating yourself after an interview — even a great one — can help you learn more about your own strengths and weaknesses.

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Ace The Job Interview With These Highly Recommended Tricks

job-interview-tricks

Aside from submitting a resume full of typos, the quickest way to be eliminated from consideration for a new job is making an avoidable interview blunder – like putting your foot in your mouth. Here are some tricks of landing into your dream job:

Nervous

Even if you’re more nervous than you’ve ever been, no company wants to hire someone who lacks confidence. So, in this case, honesty is not the best policy. Don’t tell your interviewer how nervous are, or were before the interview. Just fake it ’til you make it.

Weaknesses or mistakes

Never voluntarily talk about your weaknesses unless they ask you with the standard interview question, ‘What’s your biggest weakness?’ And don’t bring up mistakes you’ve made at work, unless you’re talking about them to show how you’ve made significant improvements.

Money, salary, pay, compensation etc.

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Is it the time to look for another job?

Time-for-job-change

 


1. Has your job become monotonous?

In order to advance in your career there is a need for the continuous acquisition of new skills and knowledge. If you acquire more knowledge your foundation will become stronger and you will have ability to grasp even more knowledge. If you are not doing any challenging work your professional development will start to stall. In that case, ask the manager for more responsibilities and challenging work. You can also raise the hand for volunteering in things like contribution in trade magazine or speaking at agreements. In case you want to face new challenges consistently there are always many things you can be part of.

2. Not interested with your new job responsibilities?

If your company has changed course in terms of products or services, or if your responsibilities have changed, you might not be enjoying the day-to-day tasks as much as you once did. Find out whether the change is permanent or if you’ll be doing more interesting work again in the future. At the same time, it’s also possible that you’ve simply become more interested in another professional area that your current employer doesn’t cover.

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Ten Most Common Interview Questions

interview questions

Tell me about yourself

This means: “Give me a broad overview of who you are, professionally speaking, before we dive into specifics.” You should prepare about a one-minute answer that summarizes where you are in your career and what you’re especially good at, with an emphasis on your most recent job. Keep your personal life out of it; your interviewer isn’t asking to hear about your family, hobbies or where you grew up.

What interests you about this job?

Focus on the substance of the role and how it interests you. Don’t talk about benefits, salary, the short commute or anything else unrelated to the day-to-day work you’d be doing, or you’ll signal that you’re not particularly enthusiastic about the work itself. Interviewers want to hire people who have carefully considered whether this is a job they’d be glad to do every day, and that means focusing on the work itself – not what the job can do for you.

Why did you leave your last job?

Don’t discuss conflicts with your manager or co-workers, complain about your work or badmouth employers. Job seekers are commonly advised to say they’re seeking new challenges, but that only works if you’re specific about those new challenges and how this job will provide them in a way your last job didn’t. It’s also fine to cite things like a recent or planned move, financial instability at your organization or other reasons that are true.

Why would you excel at this job?

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5 Clever Ways To Prepare For Job Interview

job-interview-tricks

Go through Job Description Carefully

Most commonly asked interview questions like “Brief about yourself”, “Your strengths and weaknesses”, “Why should we hire you” etc. might be covered in detail by hundreds of other bloggers and in books too. To know what kind of questions you will asked at interview, understand the job description carefully. For example, if it is mentioned in job description that the candidate should have good analytical skills then in such case you can expect question like “Brief about your analytical skills” or if it is written that the applicant should have good command over English (written as well as oral) then in such case obviously the expected question would be to write on any topic (they will either provide you the topic or you can choose any topic of yours).

Use LinkedIn to research the interviewer

Today, every professional person has its LinkedIn profile. So it would be better to research about the interviewer prior job interview. On LinkedIn click on the “Advanced” search and look for the name of the company you are applying to. Don’t forget to check the 1st, 2nd and 3rd connections for wide search. Read More

Things You Should Do Before Going For Job Interview

job interview

Research the organization

Feel free to appear, then ask what the organization does and how its composed. The message: You’re simply searching for a paycheck and couldn’t care less where it originates from. The organization you’re going to meeting with is going to do their own exploration on you. What do you think about the organization? You’ll need to hotshot some of that examination in the prospective employee meeting. Tell them you’re so put resources into this organization that you’ve taken eventually to figure out who is in control, what it is that they do consistently and how you can fit in and have any kind of effect. Verify you’ve checked the organization’s site, yearly reports and some other related data like press discharges and news stories.

Having some foundation information through exploration will serve you well. You would prefer not to appear to be presumptuous, yet to make a decent impression, certainty is key. It’s the exploration you do early that will give you the sort of learning to help you stand tall

Know Every Bit of Your Resume

Verify you know your resume all around. That is the archive your questioner is going to use to make inquiries. Study it as though you’re packing for a last test of the year where an A will be an absolute necessity. Furthermore, be arranged to answer pointed inquiries concerning it. Why did you leave that occupation after only six months? Why you never completed that graduate degree? What were your occupation obligations at that employment five years prior? In what capacity will those courses you took decipher into helping the organization?

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