How To Answer Behavioral Interview Questions

Behavioral job interview questions are based on the premise that past behavior is the best predictor of future behavior – and that’s why they are so often asked by employers when assessing candidates during a job interview.

These types of competency-based interview questions typically begin with the phrase, “Tell me about a time when…” – and if you’re able to understand the specific requirements of the role before your interview, you’ll be much better prepared to predict these kinds of questions and think about how you’ll answer them.

THE CAR PRINCIPLE

The golden rule when you’re answering behavioral interview questions is to adhere to what’s called the CAR principle: Context, Action, Result.

Context is about describing a situation and setting the scene for a relevant example. The key here is to choose your example well – one that clearly demonstrates the quality or skill the employer is asking about.

Action is about explaining what action you took. Be really specific rather than making vague statements and outline your steps and rationale.

Result is about detailing the outcome of your action. Offer specific facts relating to the result. For instance, quote figures and statistics that back up your declaration.

Remember these three steps to answering behavioral interview questions and you’ll be well on your way to thoroughly impressing your interviewer.

CAR IN ACTION

Q: Tell me about a time when you helped to turn around your team’s sales performance.

Context: “One of my previous employer’s sales divisions had been experiencing decreasing sales – so I was brought in to help reverse the situation. My challenge was to manage the team effectively so they were able to actually exceed (not just meet) their sales targets.”

Action: “Over a six-month period, I introduced several initiatives within the team, including: setting specific and measurable sales targets for each individual within the team; introducing weekly sales meetings for the team and for each individual within the team; and implementing a structured sales training program.

I also conducted market research to identify what our main competitors were doing, set up focus groups with major clients to establish key goals, and introduced a new remuneration system that linked sales performance to remuneration packages.”

Result: “We lifted sales by 60% and exceeded sales targets by 25% in the first quarter, and continued the upward trajectory throughout the next year.”

SAMPLE BEHAVIOURAL JOB INTERVIEW QUESTIONS

Your ability to answer behavioural interview questions can make or break your attempt to secure that dream job – so we’ve put together some sample behavioural interview questions to help you more adequately prepare.

Communication

“Give an example of a time when you were able to build rapport with someone at work, even in a stressful or challenging situation.”

“Tell me about a time when you had to give someone constructive criticism.”

“Give me an example of how you were able to use your ability to communicate and persuade to gain buy-in from a resistant audience.”

Teamwork

“Give me an example of a time when you had to cope with interpersonal conflict when working on a team project.”

“Tell me about a time when your fellow team members were de-motivated. What did you do to improve morale?”

“Describe a situation where others you were working with on a project disagreed with your ideas. What did you do?”

Problem-solving

“Tell me about a difficult problem you were faced with, and how you went about tackling it.”

“Describe a time when you proactively identified a problem at work and were able to devise and implement a successful solution.”

“Have you ever faced a problem you could not solve?”

Creativity

“Tell me about a situation in which you worked with team members to develop new and creative ideas to solve a business problem.”

“Describe the most creative work-related project you have completed.”

“Give an example of when your creativity made a real difference in the success of a product or project.”

Organisation and planning

“Have you ever managed multiple projects simultaneously? What methods did you use to prioritise and multi-task?”

“What specific systems do you use to organise your day?”

“Describe a time when you failed to meet a deadline.”

Analytical skills

“Describe a situation where you had to interpret and synthesise a large amount of information or data.”

“Give me an example of a recent roadblock and your logic and steps in overcoming it.”

“What was your greatest success in using logic to solve a problem at work?”

Integrity

“Give an example that demonstrates your professional integrity.”

“Tell me about a time when you had to stand your ground against a group decision.”

“Have you ever had to work with, or for, someone who was dishonest? How have you handled this?”

Accomplishments

“Describe some projects that were implemented and carried out successfully primarily because of your efforts.”

“What are three achievements from your last job that you are particularly proud of?”

“What has been your most rewarding professional accomplishment to date?”

By preparing yourself in advance and familiarizing yourself with these and other sample behavioral interview questions, you’ll be primed and ready for any number of behavioral questions that may come your way.

Source: http://bit.ly/22LeN0C

Here’s What the Perfect Resume Looks Like

Resumes are essential to the job search, but let’s be honest: creating one is not exactly anyone’s idea of a good time. With so many conflicting pieces of advice, you might feel like you don’t know where to start or what to do. But don’t worry — this time, we’ve done the heavy lifting. We combed through some of our best resume advice and compiled it into one info graphic to give you an easy-to-follow outline for a resume that will wow recruiters and hopefully, land you the job of your dreams.

Ready for a resume revamp? Read on below!

1. Design Matters: Don’t go overboard with intricately decorated templates. Look for sufficient white space, margins of at least .7 inches, and a font size no smaller than 11 pt.

2. Be Reachable: Make it easy for recruiters to reach out to you by providing your contact info near the header.

3. Show Off Your Skills: Don’t make recruiters hunt for the most critical information on your resume — include a table of your key soft and hard skill sets up top. Make sure your highlighted skills show why you’re a good fit for the job — all the better if these are keywords from the job description.

4. List Your Experience: This section should include each company you’ve worked for, your title, the dates you worked there, and several bullet points that describe your key accomplishments and responsibilities.

5. Quantify Your Experience:  Whenever you can, use concrete data points — it helps provide recruiters with the scope and context of your work, and demonstrates how you contributed to the bottom line.

6. Include Other Positions: Don’t be afraid to include positions that aren’t directly related to the one you’re applying for, especially if you have limited work experience. You can still use it to demonstrate the skills and qualities you want highlighted.

7. Get the Grade: Many jobs require degrees or certifications, so make sure to list yours. GPA is optional, but may be worth including if you’ve graduated recently with high marks.

8. The Extra Stuff: Add some color to your resume with a short catch-all ‘Additional Experience’ section at the end. Include clubs/organizations, volunteer experience, awards you’ve won, and even interesting hobbies or activities.

9. Keep It Concise: Limit your resume to 1-2 pages at the most.

Source: http://bit.ly/2tUFGaB

QUALITIES THAT HR IS LOOKING IN NEW HIRES

QUALITIES THAT HR IS LOOKING IN NEW HIRES

Here are the some key qualities That HR look out in the new hires to ensure longevity of the tenure.

  1.  Endurance:

Turnovers can be expensive for HR. Hence the foremost qualities they look for in new hires are endurance, commitment and prospect of longevity of the tenure.

  1.  Team player:

Anybody can work in silos but it takes a lot of perseverance and high levels of patience and gratitude to work as a team player. Incidentally, all these qualities make for a good employee itself.

  1.   Ambitious:

Motivated and self-driven people are an asset to any organization. Ambitious employees work hard and try to surpass their own excellence, which in turn benefits the organization at large. Who doesn’t want to hire such employees?

  1.   Trustworthy:

Trust is a very tricky characteristic to identify in an employee. An employee who is true in his/her work and dependable is sure to have long-term benefits for the organizations and is most likely to stick around for long.

  1.    Positive attitude:

They say, if you have a positive attitude in life you are a sure winner. Organizations look out for such employees because they know such employees can stand up to failure and competition with much confidence.

  1.  Multi-tasking skills:

Businesses often resort to cost cutting by having fewer employees who can multi-task. With growing competition, multi-tasking is one of the desired quality HR looks for in new hires.

Promoting yourself: the rules of success

Promoting yourself: the rules of success - Morpheus Consulting

A diligent and hard-working project manager at a global bank was known for meeting deadlines. A functional expert and a team player, she never hesitated to work beyond the designated hours. Self-evasive and reticent, she strongly believed that her work would speak louder than words to get her the recognition she deserved. Much to her dismay, however, she was passed over for a promotion that year.

Inherent excellence is not always enough to fetch recognition.

In his book Power: Why Some Have It And Some Don’t, Jeffrey Pfeffer, professor of organizational behaviour at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business, says it’s not enough to presume that success is based on the quality of your work and job performance alone. Potential sponsors need to know about your skills, competencies, accomplishments and experiences to be encouraged to make a positive difference to your career. You can share information on this so that you get career-enhancing opportunities “If you blend into the woodwork, no one will care about you, even if you are doing a great job. Being memorable equals getting picked,” says Pfeffer.

How to do it

Self-promotion is a delicate art because if you overdo it, you come across as a braggart, and if you underplay, you don’t get the accolades. “It needs to be subtle, responsible and balanced,” cautions Saket Kanoria, managing director, TCPL Packaging Ltd. “Self-promotion that takes the toxic shape of running down other people’s work, claiming credit which rightfully belongs elsewhere, and taking advantage of proximity to one’s manager, may fetch short-term gains, but will undoubtedly prove counter-productive in the long run,” adds Sunder Ram Korivi, dean, School for Securities Education, National Institute of Securities Markets, Navi Mumbai. There should be a line between gaining a following and becoming sickeningly self-promotional, especially if you don’t wan’t to be penalized for the latter.

Here are a few strategies to generate more visibility:

Prepare your story

A senior stakeholder you meet in the elevator enquires, “What’s up?”, and you respond with, “All well. Thanks!” Instead, you could have seized this opportunity to promote yourself by highlighting an accomplishment or two. For instance, “We successfully closed a record number of 248 transactions this month—25% above average.” Or, “I finished cross-training on process ABC. I am now conversant with a range of processes in the system.” The trick lies in being prepared with your story, and arming yourself with data points that you can reel off at the drop of a hat.

Redefine self-promotion

Since promoting one’s accomplishments goes against the value of modesty ingrained in us, let’s first rethink the definition of self-promotion. “Just as the objective of marketing a product is to generate awareness about its key benefits to help customers make sound decisions, think of self-promotion as a responsible communication of your talents and accomplishment to those who can leverage and benefit from this information, thus making it a win-win proposition,” says Darshana Ogale, chief operating officer, S P Jain School of Global Management.

In his 2014 book Promote Yourself: The New Rules For Career Success, author Dan Schawbel highlights the disconnect between what managers look for when deciding on promotions (a positive attitude and the ability to prioritize) and what employees think managers want (communication skills and leadership ability). So, it is important to showcase a range of abilities instead of coming across as one-dimensional.

Clothe it in anecdotes

Share your success in the form of a story. Instead of saying that you did an awesome job negotiating a successful deal with a tough customer, share your strategy and challenges in cracking the deal, enabling your team to learn from your experience. Engage with humility, focus on facts, and ensure that those stories are relevant, says Dorie Clark, in a Harvard Business Review article, How To Promote Yourself Without Looking Like A Jerk.

“Align your story with the context and the audience. Share it with a genuine belief that it is relevant to the audience, rather than with a mindset of promoting yourself. Authenticity matters,” says Atul Srivastava, chief executive officer, Effective People, a Mumbai-based human resources consulting and training company.

impactful introduction

When called upon to introduce yourself at an external conference, an internal training programme or to a visiting global practice head, go beyond the vanilla introduction encompassing your role, designation and experience. Make your introduction audience-centric and impactful by incorporating elements that differentiate and lend a recall value. For instance, something like, “I am an avid trekker, I did the Everest base camp trek last year,” is likely to stick in the minds of the audience. “A compelling introduction at an event, almost always an outcome of serious introspection and practice, certainly helps you make an impact. In fact, sometimes just asking a question at a conference or a seminar gets you noticed, and works towards your promotion,” says Srivastava.

Engage beyond your core work

As the organization expands, it is not easy to get noticed outside your immediate circle. “Participating in forums outside my core work, like knowledge-sharing forums, organizational committees, corporate social responsibility initiatives, diversity, etc. has gone a long way in helping me garner visibility and connect with people beyond my operational network,” says Ogale.

Communicate with your manager

“Proactively meeting your manager not only to seek feedback, but also to apprise him of your accomplishments, challenges and aspirations is important. While a manager is likely to be aware of your big-ticket items, your differentiator may lie in some of your smaller achievements,” says Korivi. So tracking your accomplishments and feeding your manager with regular updates would be mutually beneficial—it would not only help you promote yourself, but also offer your manager data points to identify areas where you could contribute. Managing others’ perceptions about your accomplishments separates workplace winners from those who don’t move up the ladder, says Pfeffer.

Engage on social media

Soumitra Dutta, professor at the Institut Européen d’Administration des Affaires (Insead), a graduate business school, and writer of the Harvard Business Review article Managing Yourself: What’s Your Personal Social Media Strategy?, strongly advocates embracing the social media as a platform for promoting yourself, building your personal brand and engaging with stakeholders by communicating who you are. “Active participation on social media is a powerful tool—the difference between leading effectively and ineffectively, and between advancing and faltering in the pursuit of your goals,” says Prof. Dutta.

Start with posting an impactful profile, portraying your expertise by engaging in discussion forums, posting articles and commenting on posts, thus creating visibility for yourself. “I have found that leveraging the organization’s intranet is a great way of getting your story before your audience,” says Ogale.

Reverse promotion

When you promote others, guided by the principle of reciprocity, they promote you in return. This reverse promotion, besides enhancing your visibility and highlighting your achievements, also helps you build relationships and earn goodwill. So, be open to connecting with people, learning about, and promoting, their talents and achievements.

Source: http://bit.ly/2ArpFJH

6 Impressive Skills to Include on Your Resume

In a job market where recruiters review an average of up to 250 applications per job listing, you need to submit a resume that stands out. But where do you even start?

Since you already know which skills to leave off your resume, and you’ve studied which trends to try and which to ignore, it’s time to talk about what should be on your resume. Here are three experts’ takes on the seven skills that will have recruiters excited to see your resume come into their queue.

Hard Skills

Whether you’re a high-tech data scientist or a high-performing elementary school teacher, here’s a selection of hard skills that can make you stand out from the competition.

1. Data Collection and Analysis

Increased technology usage in the workplace means there’s more data than ever to collect, track and analyze. That’s why data analysis is such a huge growth area, says Matt Sigelman, the CEO of Burning Glass Technologies, in Time: “Mainstream American companies have come to realize that in order to become more effective in the marketplace, they need to analyze data,” explains Sigelman. “And we’re seeing those skills showing up at a premium in a variety of industries, including marketing, logistics jobs and operations management jobs.”

How to Highlight: Reflect on the opportunities you’ve had to capture and analyze data in your current job and include them on your resume. If you can’t think of any, consider taking a free online course in data analytics from a website like edX or Coursera, then apply what you learn on the job.

2. Social Media

Social media makes a timely addition to any resume, says career coach Bethany Wallace: “Regardless of career field and job role, possessing social media management skills is a plus for any candidate,” she remarks. “Many companies still resist hiring a social media manager, and the ability to fill that gap might make the difference in a candidate’s standing.”

How to Highlight: If you completed coursework or an internship that involved social media, include it on your resume — extra points for sharing specifics on a campaign you executed. Don’t list recreational social media on your resume — limit this to times that you’ve managed social media accounts in a professional capacity.

3. Content Management Systems

Website building and design aren’t just for coders anymore. Easy-to-learn platforms like WordPress, Blogger, Squarespace and more can help you learn the basics of creating and maintaining a blog or website. “WordPress is the most popular CMS (content management system) in the world. Tons of sites, big and small, use it to power their businesses,” says Laurence Bradford, creator of Learn to Code With Me, on Forbes. “WordPress is helpful to know in a range of careers from web development to writing.”

How to Highlight: Learn how to use these platforms through one of the many available online classes or tutorials, then list it under the skill section of your resume. If you want to go the extra mile, build a personal website or online portfolio and include a link to it so recruiters and hiring managers can see your skills for themselves.

Soft Skills

Even in a technical age, it’s not all about technical skills. In fact, in a report compiled by the International Association of Administrative Professionals, OfficeTeam and HR.com, 67 percent of HR managers said they’d hire a candidate with strong soft skills even if that person’s technical skills were lacking.

While you can’t rely on being hired for a job based on soft skills alone, such a strong majority opinion among hiring managers is more than enough incentive to bring a focus to soft skills on your resume and in your interview process. Just don’t list them out point-blank — that’s an amateur (and unconvincing) way to do it. Instead, let your resume bullet points demonstrate how you’ve leveraged these skills.

1. Communication

Communication consistently ranks among the most important skills for a candidate to have — and that includes both verbal and written. “According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, 73.4% of employers want a candidate with strong written communication skills,” says Kaleigh Moore, contributing writer for Inc.

How to Highlight: Edit your resume for grammar and spelling, but also for clarity. Rewrite long sentences to be shorter, then read your resume out loud to make sure all of your thoughts make sense. Prove your communication skills by email and phone by being brief and to-the-point — yet warm — whenever you interact with the recruiter.

2. Problem-Solving

“Employees themselves are hopefully ‘solved problems,’ fulfilling their job duties and more,” writes Jessica Amidon on the AthLife blog, a career development resource for post-professional, professional and collegiate athletes. “An employee that is able to present creative solutions to complex problems creates tremendous value for the employer and makes himself indispensable.”

How to Highlight: Most resume bullet points should focus on the solution to a problem, such as “Increased email open rates 10 percent.” Whenever possible, articulate the problem as well as the solution so that recruiters can see exactly how you’ve applied your problem-solving skills.

3. Positive Attitude

It’s not hard to understand why employers value this skill so highly — it can help in nearly every situation you encounter in the workplace, from collaborating with others to identifying creative solutions. “Having a positive attitude is absolutely crucial if candidates want to stand out from their peers,” Wallace agrees.

How to Highlight: It’s easier to display a positive attitude in an interview than on a resume, but you can start by framing your on-the-job challenges in a positive way. Using verbs like “overcame,” “surmounted,” “succeeded” and “won” can contribute to an overall positive, energetic impression.

Whether you’re one of the millions of people looking for a job, or currently employed but considering your next move, list as many of these skills as you can to make your resume pop up in front of the recruiters.

Source: http://bit.ly/2zPiUjS

Preparing For A Phone Interview? Four Tips To Keep Top Of Mind

You made it past the initial resume screening and are scheduled for a phone interview. It’s easy to overlook this step in the process, but remember, if you don’t do well here, the chances of getting to the next step in the hiring process are next to nil. The person conducting the interview is either going to put their stamp of approval on you as a candidate or send you a rejection letter. Ace this step and you may even gain an ally in the hiring process.

Here are a few dos (and don’ts) to make sure you get the face-to-face interview.

1. Make sure you set aside time so there’s no conflict.

Set up a quiet place where you can have a candid conversation without risk of intrusion. As an interviewer, I always ask a candidate prior to starting if it’s still a good time for them. Recently, I have gotten responses like:

• “Hang on, let me go outside. I’m at a restaurant.”

• “Sure, I’m in the car driving so I may cut out, but go ahead.”

• “I may have to put you on hold if someone like my boss comes into the office.”

• “If you don’t mind the (kids, pets, etc.) making noise…”

The truth is, if you can’t set aside the time to talk about a career move to my company, I will assume you are not taking the job seriously or respecting my time. Why would I want you to join our team? If there is a conflict, let your interviewer know ahead of time so you can reschedule.

2. Do a little research.

You are almost guaranteed to be asked the question, “What do you know about our company and/or this role?” If you are not prepared to answer this, your interviewer is going to lose interest in you quickly.

While it’s the interviewer’s job to learn enough about your background and skill set, your job should be to learn enough about the company and the role to see if you want to move to the next step. They’ve read your resume, done some background research on you and have a set of questions tailored to what they have already learned. You should be equally prepared.

Spend some time Googling the company, and read their website to learn the core business and know their competitors. Take a look at LinkedIn and get a better understanding of their general organization. Once you have done this, make a list of key questions you want answers to. Have those ready during the phone interview so you’re not improvising.

3. Remember to be professional.

One of the things I like to do is get people to let their guard down. But over the phone, it is easy to fall into the trap of becoming too casual. You would be surprised at what folks say over the phone once they get too comfortable.

I cannot tell you how many times a candidate has dropped a swear word or used an inappropriate phrase. This only makes your interviewer wonder whether you will do this with clients, co-workers or other leaders who would interview you if they were to move you ahead.

Talk to the interviewer as if you were in their office. Envision yourself at the conference table with them. A neat trick is to pull up their profile on LinkedIn so you have their photo in front of you while you interview. It will help you stay focused. In this case, a picture is worth more than 1,000 words!

4. Be prepared to close.

When the interview is over, be sure to ask about next steps. Leaving the phone interview with an ambiguous ending is a sure recipe for not moving ahead. Not indicating that you want a next step is also telling.

Even if you need to dictate what the next step is, be sure it’s mutually agreed upon. For example, “This was a great conversation, but I would like to talk it over with my spouse. I will get back to you by Tuesday.” Similarly, you should expect to hear, “We’ll be interviewing several candidates and will get back to you by Tuesday to let you know if we are moving you ahead.”

Think of your phone interview as a low-stress, initial opportunity for you and the company to get to know each other. Don’t torpedo your chances of getting hired because you exemplified your weaknesses over your strengths.

5 Phrases To Close Your Cover Letter & Land The Interview

Writing a cover letter isn’t an easy task for many job seekers. There’s a lot of pressure because, sometimes, the cover letter is the only piece the recruiter will read. Therefore, your cover letter must be a piece of writing that describes your achievements and how you will help the company succeed.

Additionally, you want your cover letter to illustrate how you are the best fit for the company and for the reader to believe you have the qualifications they seek. If you want to land an interview with your cover letter, you don’t want to sound vague or wishy-washy. Your cover letter should illustrate why you are the best fit and how you will help the company or organization reach success.

However, when writing the closing paragraph of your cover letter, it’s easy to have a passive voice because you don’t want to appear overconfident. For example, if you say, “I look forward to hearing from you,” that’s great — but that alone doesn’t seal the deal. The closing paragraph of your cover letter must be one of the strongest elements because it is the last impression you leave in the reader’s mind.

Here are five phrases to include in the final paragraph of your cover letter that will help you seal the deal for your next interview:

1. “I am very excited to learn more about this opportunity and share how I will be a great fit for XYZ Corporation.” Strong cover letter closings are enthusiastic and confident. You want the reader to have the impression you are truly passionate about the position and working for their company. This statement will also illustrate your ability to fit into the company culture and how your personality and work ethic is exactly what they’re looking for.

2. “I believe this is a position where my passion for this industry will grow because of the XYZ opportunities you provide for your employees.” It’s always a good idea to explain what you find attractive about working for the company and how you want to bring your passions to the table. By doing this, you can illustrate how much thought you dedicated to applying for the position and how much you care about becoming a part of the company.

3. “If I am offered this position, I will be ready to hit the ground running and help XYZ Company exceed its own expectations for success.” By adding this piece to your conclusion, you will be able to add some flare and excitement to your cover letter. The reader will become intrigued by your enthusiasm to “hit the ground running.” Employers look for candidates who are prepared for the position and are easy to train. Therefore, this phrase will definitely raise some curiosity and the reader will want to discover what you have to offer for their company.

4. “I would appreciate the opportunity to meet with you to discuss how my qualifications will be beneficial to your organization’s success.” Remember, you want to make it clear in your cover letter how the employer will benefit from your experience and qualifications. You want to also express how your goal is to help the organization succeed, not how the position will contribute to your personal success.

5. “I will call you next Tuesday to follow up on my application and arrange for an interview.” The most essential part of your closing is your “call to action” statement. Remember, the purpose of your cover letter is to land an interview. Don’t end your cover letter saying you’ll hope to get in touch. Explain to the reader the exact day and how you will be contacting them. When you state you will be following up with the employer, make sure you do it!

Remember, the closing of your cover letter is the most important element that will help you land your next interview. By crafting a strong, confident, and enthusiastic closing paragraph, you will leave the reader feeling like you could be the best candidate for the position.

Source: http://bit.ly/2le52gp

What Recruiters Want to See at Each Stage of the Interview Process

Everyone sort of prepares for their interviews the same way. They research the company theyre applying for and brush up on long-forgotten academic material. While this is a great start, its important to realize that recruiters and hiring managers have a vastly different set of criteria for what makes the perfect entry-level candidate than for what makes the ultimate executive. After all, the average day in the life of a second-year financial assistant is going to be far different from that of a CFO. 

For Entry-Level Employees

1. Dont be afraid to be afraid

 Recruiters arent demonic perfection seekers. They understand that entry-level job applicants will most likely be pretty new to this whole interviewing thing. If youre young and just starting off on your professional career, dont be too worried about showing some anxiety or a few jitters. In fact, during my career as a recruiter, many job applicants have outright professed to me at the start of their interviews that they were totally nervous. And you know what? I was totally fine with that, and other recruiters will be too.

2. Be prepared to talk about your college experience and your goals

At this point, you dont have too much work experience to talk about with your interviewers. Interviews can last as long as an entire day, so you can bet that your college experience and career goals will come up at some point. Failing to plan can often mean that you plan to fail, so go into the interview with a strong idea of what you want to say. It would be difficult to come up with a good response right on the spot to nebulous questions such as Where do you see yourself in 10 years?” or What about your college experience has prepared you the most for this job? 

3. Befriend the interviewer by showing your likable side

I hate to say it, but interviewers often care more about the likability of entry-level candidates than whether or not theyre actually qualified for the job. This is because the person interviewing you will often also be your future boss and mentor, so it makes perfect sense that they would want to hire someone whom they personally like and want to work with. A strong interview performance means establishing a strong connection with your interviewer. Try to show off your personality instead of just answering questions robotically. You can even get a bit personal if you’d like to.

4. Show that you are committed

 According to Julia Scott, a founding partner at Mock Interview, companies oftentimes lose money by hiring you – at least early on. They have to train you, and this requires time and effort from more senior employees who could be doing something else to benefit the company. On top of that, they need to pay you a yearly salary. So what companies are really hoping for is that youre committed to sticking around. That way, their efforts will be rewarded down the road once youve become a true asset to the company as opposed to a liability. This is why its super duper important to show interviewers that you are in it for the long haul.

For Mid-Level Employees

1. Emphasize your achievements at past jobs 

Youre no longer a wildcard. Youve been working for a number of years now so recruiters are going to be expecting you to tell them what youve managed to achieve over the course of your previous jobs. Conveying to your interviewer that you were an effective employee in the past is perhaps the most important message to get across, because this is one tell-tail sign that youll be an effective employee in the future as well.

2. Present your unique value proposition

Your past work experience should have molded you into an employee with a unique set of skills and capabilities that set you apart from other candidates.Now its up to you to bundle all of these valuable traits together and present them as your sales pitch on why you should be hired. Unlike the case with entry-level employees, interviewers are expecting mid-level employees to be able to start generating the company profits immediately upon arrival. 

3. Showcase your hard skills and technical expertise 

Mid-level job interviews de-emphasize soft skills and focus on what you can actually do as an employee. Those who show a superior technical proficiency will be the ones who edge out a win here. Even though your hard skills may already be listed on your resume and cover letter, you should be actively seeking opportunities during your interview to advertise the arsenal of skills youve acquired over the years. 

Its not enough to simply say that you know how to program in C++. Youve got to provide evidence that your C++ prowess is better than that of the next guy waiting in line to be interviewed. Try your best to bring up examples of the most impressive projects that youve completed in the past.

For Executive-Level Employees

1. Flaunt your leadership and management abilities 

senior-level employee is likely to be the manager of an entire team. While its still, of course, important to know the technical side the job, interviewers will test your hard skills far less than they will for job applicants at other levels of experience. In fact, with all your years of work experience, hiring managers often make the assumption that you already have complete mastery over the technical aspects of the job. Now the emphasis is placed on your ability to lead and coordinate others in doing the work you once did in the past. 

2. Explain your vision

Its all about the big picture. Often times, companies want to bring on a seasoned executive who has the vision necessary to steer them in a new and better direction. The person sitting across from you is going to want to know what that new direction is and where it will take the company. Not only do you need to clearly explain to the interviewer your vision and overall game plan, you may also need to give reasons for why your approach is superior to alternatives that other job candidates may propose. 

3. Show how you can increase the companys bottom line today

This should be one of your main selling points. How are you going to improve the companys bottom line once hired? While describing your vision and goals is one thing, its another to present numerical data and facts that support the notion that youll be able to ultimately increase the companys net income. Many candidates can seem quite wishy-washy when explaining their ideas, so always be sure to bring things back to dollar terms.

 

6 tips to dress professionally for an interview

Tips for job interview

 

When you go for a job interview, you make your first contact with your potential employer and it’s always best for you to give them a great first impression. Here are some tips that you can use to look professional and confident when you go for your interview.

Feel comfortable

You should wear your attire that you are comfortable with. This will prevent you from twitching on your seat that makes you and your interviewee look uncomfortable. So wear something lose that let you feel light.

Limit Jewelry

Not just women, but even men should limit wearing swaying earrings, loud bracelets and other unnecessary accessories that might cause distraction. Flashy jewelry will also be a distraction for the recruiter to keep eye contact with you

Don’t overuse perfume.

It’s good to smell fresh and attractive. But don’t over use perfumes or deodorant which will let you be that unwanted standout person in the room. The recruiters shouldn’t remember you for having that distinct smell.

Hide your piercings and tattoos

Tattoos and piercing are the latest trend among young adults. However, it doesn’t show a professional character when you apply for a job. It is better if you have any markings covered and made invisible to your employer.

Have a back up

It’s always good to have a backup shirt just in case you happen to get some dirt, sauce or some stain while you are on your way to your interview. Even if you plan not to take the public transport or not to have a meal before your interview, you might still be prone to have an accident because of someone else.  You don’t want to be in those commercials!

Look good, feel great

Have a shower, comb your hair, and look as if you are going on a date with a celebrity. You shouldn’t always rely on deos to cover up your smell. Also don’t forget to have some mints before you walk in.

Ask if you are not sure

If you are not sure what you should wear for your interview, don’t be afraid to ask your employer. It doesn’t give out any negative impression about you and you don’t end up having a dilemma on what you should be wearing that morning for your interview.

What to do after Job Interview?

What to do after Job Interview

 So, the job interview is over

Did your interview go well or not, the worst thing you can do is nothing at all. It’s always important to be prepared for any possible outcome – and do the most you can to boost your chances. To help turn your potential post-interview stress into a positive attitude that could help land your dream job, here are some of our top tips on what to do after a job interview:

Follow up, but don’t be impatient

Do follow-up with a telephone call to the employer within a week to ten days (or sooner, if the employer had a shorter timetable) to ask about the position. And do continue to build rapport and sell your strengths during the phone call.

Take notes on what worked, and what didn’t work.

A great interview might tempt you to put your job search on a shelf and move on with your personal life. You should have some time to write down what did, or did not, go well in your interview. Evaluating yourself after an interview — even a great one — can help you learn more about your own strengths and weaknesses.

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