5 CRITICAL INTERVIEW TIPS

Professional introduction

Every interviewer asks for an introduction. A candidate should be prepared with the best 4-5 liner summary starting with his present position and job role. You should give a very crisp summary of past roles, but don’t discount your education degrees and achievements in those roles.

Personal interests

All interviewers ask for personal details as well. This question is best answered by a brief about your immediate family and should have mention of your interest. Mention those hobbies where you have won some laurels to create an impression on the interviewer.

Industry knowledge

Every interviewer will want to check your on ground know how and understanding. Make sure you know the latest trend about your industry and company in particular. It helps to talk about them in a manner where you can highlight your achievements as well.

Timeliness

Being punctual will only win you good points. Arriving late and then justifying that with excuses will spoil your reputation even before an interaction.

Politeness

Common sense is becoming uncommon. Hence wishing the interviewer, saying things like – thank you, please, pardon me (when you haven’t understood a query well), if I may add (when stating a personal opinion), have a good day, it was a pleasure meeting you all – will reflect well on you.

The Two-Minute Resume Review: Where Skills Meet Results

Many of us who have chosen to navigate the constantly variable — and often unpredictable — waters of human resources are familiar with the common components of the resume. Most applications ask for them, many demand them.

With all of the resources available for candidates to search and reference for resume preparation, there is really no excuse for the submission of a sub-standard presentation of their career snapshot. The action verbs that are trending, examples of job descriptions, requirements and templates galore are literally at the fingertips of those who sit in front of a search engine. Knowing that all of these tools are at the disposal of the applicant should imply that the resume quality would be somewhat less variable among the candidate pool. So, should we even spend time on the details of what was once the only passport to the next round of the process? In short, absolutely.

The candidate who leverages the components of the application process to tailor their resume to your posting should migrate toward the top of the pile, simply because they’ll waste less of your time. To help decipher those detail-oriented applicants, here are five ways to cut through the fancy verbiage and get to predictive results, section by section:

1. Objective: “To obtain a position in…” This section can provide insight to the candidate’s maturity in the job market — it should be obvious that they’re seeking a position, so restating that concept is a waste of space that could be used further outlining their qualifications. Assessment: Skip it.

2. Education: It’s always perplexed me when I see this section toward the top, as if the candidate believes that promoting the formal aspects of their training is worth making note of first. The degree displays the candidate’s ability to learn and demonstrate proficiency in a controlled environment. Where they went to school outlines their professional network and perhaps the “culture” of learning they experienced. If the position requires a bachelor’s degree, we shouldn’t see high school graduation information as it just takes up space. And, unless specifically called for within the posting or they’re applying for a scholarship, GPA isn’t as relevant as applicants would like it to be. Assessment: Skim it.

3. Experience: Review for merely a restating of the job description, but hope for a collection of results achieved. Working backward from their most recent position, candidates should describe their experiences in terms of what they actually accomplished, not what they were responsible for. For instance, seeing the bulleted phrase “Responsible for leading a team of 15 employees to success in plastics production,” sounds important. But, were they actually successful? If the candidate has the necessary experience but fails to make their results clear, either place them in limbo until all have been reviewed or advance and target results in the behavioral interview. Assessment: Review for results.

4. References: Candidates should be selecting references specifically pertaining to the job for which they are applying, and if your hiring process requires personal and professional references, they should be included the application. The removal of required references from the resume allows the candidate more space to describe their qualifications as opposed to someone else’s contact information. The astute candidate will avoid this repetition and optimize their space. Assessment: Skip it.

5. Skills and certifications: Given the increasingly standard requirement of the bachelor’s degree, this section will often generate the most relevant substance for candidate evaluation. Unfortunately, applicants will often focus most of their efforts into a robust description of experiences and minimize the skills categorization. A candidate’s ability to demonstrate enough self-awareness to define what tools are in their toolbox will provide the hiring manager with an insight into how they may align with the responsibilities of the position, regardless of their experiences.

The increasingly popular preferences for certifications such as the PHR, PMP, SHRM-CSP, display the higher emphasis on specialization and proven skills acquisition — all accompanied by a third-party validation. This is where candidates can draw on their previous organizational experience to promote the skills obtained as well as the formal and professional experience. For example, if I see a candidate list the “Texas FFA Association” anywhere on their resume, I should expect a skills section including advanced record keeping, public speaking and communication, efficient conduct of meetings, emotionally-intelligent leadership, etc. The intuitive candidate will highlight this degree of proficiency through maximizing the skills they bring to the table as they relate to the position. Assessment: Of crucial importance — read it.

The resume’s relevance can be determined by the organization’s desire to seek insight into the candidate’s attention to detail, coupled with the hiring managers’ understanding of the relationship between skill sets and results. Experience in one position of the same name doesn’t guarantee success in another, as the cultural aspect of an organization may be enough to force a new hire to draw a little deeper into their arsenal of resources. Their resume should describe those resources in enough detail to provide a baseline for the behavioral interview, at which point you will have enough to dig a little deeper into how they’ve applied the skills to achieve results.

Two minutes spent on the resume can lead to hours saved in unfulfilling interviews and disappointing hires. Skills coupled with past results are a definite predictor of future success, and the prepared candidates will make this understanding abundantly clear.

Source: http://bit.ly/2ych2Rn

Ten Things A Recruiter Look For In A Job Candidate

I’ve been into HR industry for more than 15 years. Since then I’ve hired thousands of people.

Here’s what I look for in a job candidate.

1.  Look for someone who is awake and aware of their surroundings. This sounds like a trivial item, but it is fundamental. Many people view a job search as a clerical task, like filing their tax return. They put no thought into it. The show up at a job interview unprepared, never having spent a minute thinking about the role or how they would approach it.

2. Look for a candidate who owns their story. Many people don’t. When they talk about their career, they say “I got hired at Company A, and that was okay for a while but then they laid me off. My sister knew about a job in Kansas so I went out there, but then that company shut down.” Their whole career history is about things that happened to them. There is no agency or ownership of any of the moves they’ve made. I want to hire someone who makes their own decisions!

3. Look for someone who has their own opinions. I hope the candidate doesn’t stare at my face as they speak, hoping that their words meet with my approval. Who cares what I think? I am just another person on the planet, one of seven billion.

4. Want to hire someone who can see the intersection between the work they’ve already done and the work I am hiring someone to do. It doesn’t have to be linear, left-brain relevance. They could have worked in a different function or industry. Those things don’t matter nearly as much as a person’s ability to put themselves in the hiring manager’s shoes and say “I hear what you are saying. It sounds like your problem is X  — here’s how I’ve solved that problem in the past.”

5. Look for someone with a sense of humor. We spend too much time at work to be serious all the time. If work is stiff and formal, it’s no fun. Time-and-motion-type “efficiency” is overrated. Real efficiency comes from tapping the human power we all bring to work — if our leaders allow us to use it!

6. Hire folks who are confident in their own abilities. I don’t want to hire someone who is afraid to speak with their own voice. How could a fearful person help me solve my biggest problems? I don’t want to hire the most docile or submissive candidate. Some managers do, of course — but how long could you stand working for someone like that?

7. Look for a candidate who values their life outside of work.

8. Want to hire someone who knows what they want from their next job and their career. I am excited when a candidate says “I want to work in the corporate world for a few years, and then start my own business.” We all need an entrepreneurial outlook and mindset these days, whether we work for ourselves or someone else. People with an entrepreneurial mindset look out at the horizon to spot problems before they can cause trouble. I don’t want to hire someone who only focuses on the work on their desk.

9. Hire people who expect more out of their work than just a paycheck. I want to work around people with ideas, sparky people who try new things just to see what will happen. I want to get their texts at six in the morning that say “I just had the craziest thought, stepping out of the shower! What if we tried…”

10. Finally, I look for a candidate who takes responsibility for their decisions. Sadly, many candidates don’t. They show up as victims, rather than the most important and powerful person in their own life.

We all run into roadblocks and hardships. It’s part of life. How we deal with them is everything. I want to hire someone who has faced adversity and who overcame it. They have muscles!

You deserve a manager who wants to hire someone as smart, capable and awesome as you are.

If you have to dumb down your resume or play a part on a job interview to get hired, you know one thing — that manager doesn’t deserve your talents!

You may have to kiss a lot of frogs to find a manager who gets you and thus deserves you.

If you aren’t willing to kiss frogs and slam doors on the wrong opportunities in order to bring the right ones in, we can all sympathize with you — but you will not grow the muscles you need until you face that challenge and surmount it.

Three Traits Recruiters Find Most Desirable In Face-to-Face Job Interviews

Recruiters and hiring managers have always considered conversational skills an important trait in new hires, but a new survey now places communication at the very top of the list.

The recruiting software company, Jobvite, together with Zogby Analytics, has just released its 2017 Recruiter Nation Report. The online survey of 831 recruiters in the U.S. is intended to identify the traits and qualities that recruiters evaluate to make the perfect hire—and the qualities they consider deal breakers, too.

Recruiters were asked the following question: “Which of the following positively impact your decision to hire a candidate during an initial in-person interview?” The question was a followed by a list of ‘subjective traits’ such as: appearance, punctuality, portfolio, conversation skills, industry knowledge and enthusiasm. According to recruiters, the most desirable traits are (in order):

1). Conversational skills (69% of recruiters said this is most important quality they look for in a job candidate)

2). Knowledge of industry

3). Enthusiasm

According to recruiters, a candidate’s ability to articulate their ideas effectively in conversation is a measure of their capacity to engage with others, a window into how the job candidate might interact with team members, clients and customers should they be hired.

Interestingly, the survey showed a generation gap among recruiters and the premium they place on conversational skills. For example, millennial recruiters place more of an emphasis on conversational skills than those recruiters over 50. A full 75% of millennials value communication skills as their top priority compared to 60% of those recruiters over 50, who place a greater emphasis on industry knowledge.

According to the survey, recruiters have seen it all— the good, the bad and the downright strange. For example, most recruiters say they’ve interviewed job candidates who didn’t know what company they were interviewing for. And a full 75% of recruiters say they’ve had candidates who dress “too casual,” which is a good reminder to dress a little better than you would for a normal day at the office.

Some qualities are subjective, of course, but the following actions are universal deal breakers, according to the survey. In other words, a majority of recruiters agreed that these actions would automatically disqualify a candidate:

  • Being rude to the receptionist or support staff
  • Checking phones during the interview
  • Showing up late
  • Bad hygiene

Communication skills will set you apart in a job interview. As I wrote in a previous article, many recruiters will openly admit that if they had to choose between two candidates with equal credentials, they are more likely to give the job to the person who can communicate better with colleagues and customers. Credentials and experience are no longer enough. Yes, they might get you through the door, but how you present yourself when you’re in the room still counts the most.

Source: http://bit.ly/2xoQIUD

7 Questions – How do you create clarity in your job and those of your employees?

The importance of a good employee-manager relationship:

The manager-employee relationships are vital for organisational effectiveness and efficiency.

Q1 Why is what I do important? Q2 What am I accountable for? Q3 How is my performance measured? Q4 How am I performing? Q5 What am I doing to improve my performance? Q6 What support do I need from my manager to improve my performance? Q7 What is in it for me, if I do great, good, average or below expectations?

Why is this relevant and important?

Despite it being basic I have experienced over and again that it does not take place and often it is only performed half-heartedly and this gives rise to several challenges.

Firstly, that the employee leaves the company due to a poor relationship with the immediate manager. Several studies show that the most often quoted reason for leaving a position is the relationship with the immediate manager.

Secondly, the performance or output from the employee is not optimal compared to what it should be.

Thirdly, a poor or less optimally performing employee has a less than optimal effect on the people and processes in the company.

Fourth, you can probably add to the list yourself, but the above mentioned three should be adequate cause for action.

The above outcome is bad for the company as well as the employee, hence worthwhile to ensure that employees and managers jointly have a good understanding of the job and their respective responsibilities this regard

The below outline is compiled of what I have picked up over the years from inspiring people, leaders I have come across and especially some bright HR people in Maersk Line and I have tried to apply the principles in my own work life, both for myself as well as for the people in my responsibility and I hope you find some inspiration either in your role as employee or as a leader.

Please note this is all about structure, not the interpersonal relationship on how we relate and communicate. Without respect and earned trust all structures come to naught, but this structure creates a culture of alignment and communication at the employee-manager level.

The work and job relationship description consists of seven (7) questions surrounding job purpose, responsibilities, measurements, feedback and managing expectations and outcome.

 Question 1 – Why is what I do important?

Always start with the WHY! Clarity of purpose is critical for motivation and can be used for guidance, when in doubt how to act.

The most important place to start is to ask and answer WHY is the job important to yourself as an employee. Someone may argue that the job is for the company’s sake and not for the employee’s sake, but I think the feeling of meaning, of purpose in one’s job is important for all people and most organisations desire employees with motivation. And frankly, getting up early every morning, commute to work, spend a large portion of your life working; it better be worth your while.

So, why is your job important to you? Is it just the money? Probably not, only you know. Is it a sense of belonging, an opportunity to learn new skills and develop as a person, opportunity for promotion and further development, the creation of good relations, meeting exciting people? Only you know – or do you? For many people it is necessary and a source of joy to belong to a group of people and we must not underestimate the importance of the social relationships in our teams.

Why is your job important for the company? Do you ensure the customers are more than satisfied? Or do you ensure that the people servicing the customers can do this well? You can also ask “What happens if I do a bad job?”, some people, maybe your nearest team-members, rely on you to do a good job or even a great job.

As leaders we work on ensuring the company vision, mission and strategy are clear and understood by all employees and that is very important. But, sometimes we forget to operational this at an employee level, and that may be cause for confusion, uncertainty or even discontent, especially if the employee feels there are discrepancies between the overall vision or strategy and his/her job.

This question is not the job description, but the answer could form the the introduction to the job description.

Question 2 – What am I accountable for?

 This question covers the activities that encompasses the job, the required output and the necessary output, perhaps some quality requirements and timeliness. Processes or systems, which the employee is responsible for, and also important relations inside the company or outside.

Matters that will often be described in the job description if such is available.

This is probably the first a new employee is informed about, since it covers what the employee is doing on a daily basis (or weekly, or monthly, or whatever is described), however, even if an employee has worked in the job for a longer time, it might still be worthwhile to revisit this once in a while.

 Generally a job description can include items such as:

  • Responsibilities
  • Tasks (Example: Prepare monthly reports)
  • Specific tasks (Example: Prepare monthly report for submission by 3rd working day of the month, and as a minimum include information on XXX and YYY, by using information from System ZZZ)
  • Hierarchical relationships (Example: This position reports to Director of Finance)
  • Requirements (The position requires specific knowledge about Danish Accounting standards and IFRS regulations)

It is important that the employee is fully aware of what his/her responsibilities are and at the same time it is important that the job description does not become a straitjacket, but has room for initiative and flexibility in line with changing requirements in the job and the organisation.

When an employee has served a year in a new position, the initial job description is likely no longer complete in relation to what the employee is actually doing and as time goes by the original job description becomes outdated, and as such it makes sense to revisit the job description from time to time.

Question 3 – How is my performance measured?

Or put in another way: “How do I know when I am doing a good job?”.

Do I have some measurable deliveries? For instance some KPIs? Something with timeliness or accuracy. Are there means to measure the quality of my work?

What am I measured on – Quality of my work – Efficiency – Innovation – Adherence to company values – Helpfulness/Being a team-player?

Am I responsible for some large projects to be delivered, by a certain date, within a specific budget or otherwise described.

Can my deliverables be described in relatively short sentences, which describe a future desired state?

How can I ‘objectively’ identify the level of my performance. Inside myself I know my effort level, but how do I know if the hard work results in the right performance?

Some organisations set targets for the following year, however, since the environment and the work tends to change over time, similar to the job description, as mentioned above, then sometimes the targets loose relevance or the targets are fulfilled already mid year, perhaps the projects were easier to finalize, and as such it is important that new targets are set.

Question 4 – How am I performing?

It is one thing to know the responsibilities and the required activities, as well as the expected output, the performance. It is another thing to assess how things are going. Am I performing? And how well am I performing?

The employee has an opinion, but so does the manager, and alignment facilitates a good dialogue.

Firstly, the employee must ensure to form his/her own understanding on the level of performance. Firstly by considering how the performance is measured and whether he/she meets the targets.

Secondly, it is also important to get feedback from the manager to assess the extent of alignment of the employee’s opinion and the manager’s opinion.

One thing is the personal performance, but also in the larger scheme of things, “are we delivering as per the overall purpose?“. For instance the employee delivers well on all personal targets, but overall the department is not meeting its targets, for instance within customer satisfaction, then that needs to be addressed jointly in the team and with the manager. Maybe the targets, or even the tasks, do not properly contribute towards the overall goal, and this must be addressed.

Sometimes there will be a difference in opinion. The employee thinks that he/she has made a stellar performance, whilst the manager will regard it as average. That has got to do with differing expectations or lack of clarity in either responsibilities or performance measurement or reviews. An on going dialogue is the most effective way to manage expectations and create clarity.

Do you get regular and clear feed-back from your manager? And how? Regular feedback is critically important for most employees in order to ensure to manage expectations and create alignment on targets, activities and behaviours.

Question 5 – What am I doing to improve my performance?

We can all get better at what we are doing, and we should strive to improve – for our own sake. So what am I doing to improve? In some cases it is a matter of working harder, going the extra mile so to speak. However, in most cases it is a matter of working smarter, not harder.

So, how do I reflect upon my job, my tasks and activities? Can I do it differently, more effectively? Do I need new training? Do we need to change the process, can we get the person who makes my input to make some changes and thereby make my job better? Can I do some changes in my output which is improving the work of the people who uses my work?

You can argue that any employee has two jobs – the current job plus the job of continuously improving the current job. In some organisations that is already included in the job description and measurements.

Question 6 – What support do I need from my manager to improve my performance?

One of the manager’s most important responsibilities is to ensure that the employees can perform and continuously improve their jobs. This requires that the employee has the right competencies i.e. the right skill-set and training to perform the job. But also the right environment, tools and support. Example: If there are challenges in getting the right input from another department, and the employee has tried in vain, then the manager must step in and take action and help to get this sorted.

Sometimes it is easy to help employees to improve performance, say an accounting employee spends a lot of time reconciling, then two computer screens may be a big facilitator in improving performance and perhaps job satisfaction. But it can also be more complex and requiring cross-functional process changes. For instance if an AP employee spends time on locating the purchase responsible on incoming supplier invoices, the solution may be to get the purchasing functions to inform suppliers to put purchaser’s name or department on the invoice.

Question 7 – What is in it for me, if I do great, good, average or below expectations?

The answer to this question is linked to the very first question i.e. Why is what I do important (for me)?

A pay-check is one answer and continued employment could also be one. Some jobs have bonus and incentives assigned depending on job performance, and some companies base salary increments on past performance, so money is one lever that companies use to try and secure best possible performance, although a number of studies show that there is no link between incentive and performance, but that discussion is not the purpose of the article.

Clearly, personal fulfilment from the feeling of doing a good job is important for most employees, but the positive recognition from management and peers is also a motivator for most people.

There may also be opportunities for promotion either into another position or by getting more interesting and challenging tasks and activities in the current position. Both may come with company supported education and courses, which may improve future employ ability and improved CV.

The above primarily goes for above average and great performances. If on the other hand the performance is below expectations and below average, then both management and employee need to do some soul searching.

First consider why the employee is performing poorly. Assuming all the preceding questions have been properly asked and answered i.e. purpose is clear, responsibilities are clear and performance requirements are clear and aligned, then have a conversation about why the performance is poor. Is it lack of skills, poor cooperation in the team, bad attitude on behalf of the employee or something else. On the basis of this it is the manager’s responsibility to put actions in motion to improve the situation, as also clarified in a previous question. However, sometimes it ends up with letting the employee leave the position.

Conclusion

For the employee it is important that the “Why this job is important for me?” is fulfilled. If it is not, then nobody gains and it is a lose-lose situation, because an unsatisfied employee is bad for business. So even if all 6 preceding questions have been asked and answered positively, and the manager has maintained a good feedback loop there may still be dissatisfaction and sometimes it is because the employee changes opinion in terms of what is important, but it can also be matters beyond the manager’s sphere of influence, so the above 7 questions do not solve all things, but it is a good start.

From a managerial perspective I venture that the 7 questions form a strong framework for focused employee-manager conversations, and it will work whether you have weekly, fortnightly, monthly, quarterly or annual one-to-one conversations, appraisals, performance reviews or whichever label is used in your organisation. The more frequent the conversation, the more emphasis on questions surrounding the actual performance, but do not forget to bring the other questions into play now and again. The conversations shall consider the employee’s seniority, maturity and competence into consideration, as well as attitude, as is the point of situational leadership.

Whatever you decide as manager, make sure to schedule regular meetings and stick to it, even if there is very little to review, you can always benefit from getting to know your employees a little bit better, so use the framework. You do not want to be in a situation where you only have a conversation with your employees, when there are problems.

Further Reflection – Is this all there is to good people management?

Is this all there is to it? As said above it is not. This is just one tool in establishing a structure towards an effective dialogue in the employee-manager relationship, and a model for analysis of your work-life or the work-life of your employees, which can create a foundation to build on. Other steps deal with creating strong and trusting teams and of improving one’s own leadership towards transformational leadership.

Several thinkers claim, that in order for people to be truly happy at work, three fundamentals must be achieved for the individual – Purpose, Hope and Friendships. This speaks to purpose of company and organisation and individual and the opportunity to improve on the individual’s situation and the social aspects, the sense of belonging.

As an employee what is your take on the 7 questions? Can you answer these for yourself and does it make sense for you? Is there anything you will change from now on?

As a manager what is your take on the 7 questions? Have you ensured that your employees have clarity of purpose in their roles, the employees understand how you evaluate their performance and do you perform regular feedback to the employees? Is there anything you will change as a result? Or do you subscribe to a different way of managing the important employee-manager relationship?

HR Technology- Leading trends in India

 

Human resources is basically the professional field that involves optimizing relationships between employers and employees while simultaneously ensuring that both groups positively contribute to the functioning of the businesses or organizations.

Nowadays, recruiting, scheduling, employee training and the many other HR functions are being transformed by a sea of innovative software platforms and vendors.

Technology is one factor that is impacting the HR department to a great extent. The wave of technological transformation impacts the organizations in two ways- Firstly, it would offer numerous tools to better manage and engage the talent in organizations. Secondly, it is helping HR managers to shift their focus from managing workforce to driving profits to the company. 

The following are a few technological trends that bring a major change in human resources management software and industry

1)   Big Data Powers Organization:

Technology has transformed the monotony through HR platforms that digitize the                  information human resource needs. One such technological trend is Big Data, which is helping HR professionals to understand their customers, market to target audience group and communicate with prospective customers. When integrated with other technologies, Big Data helps to gain a deep insight and allows HR professionals to make decisions powered by vital information.

Big Data gives HR managers a fact-based view of the current workforce, and helps them to identify emerging trends. Moreover, analytics helps recruiters assess potential employees and let you make better risk management decisions.  

2)    Mobile Apps are the Future:

 Smartphone is likely to dominate the HR landscape this year. As the workforce across various operations seeking access to applications via mobile devices, companies are considering to adapt their HR systems. Delivering this kind of functionality implies that organizations will consider HR applications with mobilization process and the interface that employees are looking for. More on, the trend of creating applications that streamlines the basic HR functionality continues to evolve. Today, mobile apps have become essential for every application that a company develops.

 

3)   Social Media – A powerful tool:

 Social media plays an active in HR today, especially when it comes to recruitment. Around a quarter of employers are using social media channels like Facebook and LinkedIn to recruit staff. HR departments can use social media not only for recruitment and for employee engagement. It is considered as a prime source for companies to reach their HR goals. Enterprises can use social media channels to reach target audience with job postings and other company related information. Few organizations use social media to tell their organization’s success story through photos, blog posts, Tumblr and Pinterest pages. And, job seekers are using these social networks to find about the company. It’s a good source to know what current and potential employees are saying about your company.

  Social media offers countless benefits to HR professionals and lets them to keep up with the news, technology and trends. You can nurture relationships by sharing the industry knowledge. All these reasons have made it an ideal platform to engage employees, build relationships and bolster communications in the work space. More companies will consider integrating applications with LinkedIn or Facebook instead of developing corporate applications in the future.

4)   Cloud based HR systems:

Be it a web application or a native application, SaaS apps play a key role in every sector including the Human Resource Department. Cloud-based applications are inevitable in today’s business environment. Collection and data storage have been so difficult until the evolution of cloud. With the advent of cloud technologies, all the information such as documents and other pertinent information can be easily accessed online. Employee information can be archived and organized in a secure location.

  However, before deploying cloud based solutions, it is required to understand whether the technology fits well for your current requirement and if it can add a real value to your business. One needs to weigh potential challenges against the benefits to understand whether cloud can overcome the business risks. Also, it is important to consider whether the business procedures can migrate with the cloud applications. By centralizing the data, the workflow and operations can be streamlined across the enterprise. Implementing cloud solutions can have a positive impact on various streams of operations ranging from product development, workforce management and business integration. Therefore, most enterprises are switching to cloud based applications.   

Common Mistakes by Recruiters !!!

Once Recruiter’s source CV’s from various channels likes Job Portals, Social Media, Internal databases etc, the logical next step they have to do is to make Cold Calls to the candidates to check their interest and assess their suitability.

This is essentially a Cold call because the Candidate is not anticipating the call. But reality is that most candidate get jobs through such cold calls and most times from Recruiters they haven’t dealt in the past. Hence Cold Calling is very important, especially when the candidate is getting multiple such calls every day from number of recruiters.

Unfortunately most Recruiters we have seen continue to make the same mistakes over and over again. Can’t blame them completely, because they have pressures to submit CV’s and hit the Customer’s email the fastest!

Giving below a few prominent mistakes Recruiters do and what they can do to correct them:

1. Am I speaking to ______?

This opening line is used by many Marketing telesales usually and hence, the likely hood is that Candidate may try to escape the call at the earliest. Instead start with addressing the person directly assuming that no other person would be using the Candidates phone. So better start is “Hi Prakash…..”

2. Are you looking for a job change?

Recruiters tend to feel that let us cut to chase and first find out whether the candidate is looking for a change or not. Correct thinking, but it is better to be optimistic and approach it by first introducing yourself and then checking if the discussion makes sense.

3. We have an urgent opening for one of our large customers in telecom. Are you interested?

Two issues here. One is ‘Urgent Opening’ no longer excites anybody. Second the recruiter has directly gone to main goal without setting right environment…e.g ‘Confirm whether you will you marry me, then I will decide whether I like you’.

4. We are looking for Recruiters with 2 years of relevant experience in IT recruiting. What is your notice period?

Many a times Recruiters jump to this stage without adequately introducing themselves, their context of the call and never talking what’s in it for the candidate…etc. Better way could be “I see that you have good IT Recruiting experience and it would be great to have your next job truly leverage this experience for faster growth”.

For regular career updates visit us on-  http://mhc.co.in/

7 Tips for Chossing Job References

7 Tips for Chossing Job Refrences

Nowadays, over 80% HR Manager Use reference checks as part of selection process. Job reference are important in confirming intelligence, attitude, and behavior included in your perfect resume and indicated during your interview. Appealingly your referee is someone you have reported to in a professional capacity. But before we go forward with the tips please choose job reference who can confirm

  1. Your profession and responsibilities
  2. Your power and areas of development
  3. Your team management and attitude towards your colleagues.
  4. Your ability to handle work on your own
  5. Most important your stability in that job
  6. Tips for Job Reference

Always give a hint to job reference before giving their contact details to a soon-to-be employer. Your previous employer should not get unexpected call, as this can work against you.

Make sure your previous employer knows about the role you have applied for so that it will be easy for them to talk about relevant skills and strengths

It’s good practice to contact your previous employer after the interview and let them know how it went. This way they can affirm your key strengths or skills relevant to the job.

Every time you change a job, make an effort to ask for a reference from your manager or co-worker. This enables you to create a file of recommendations from people who you may not be in contact with in the future.

Keep job reference up-to-date and let them know what position of your job search is. This can keep them prepared for potential call.

Say thanks when you join new company always say thanks to previous employee writing email or phone call this will keep your professional relation stronger.

Keep your professional network up-to-date , LinkedIn is best way to stay in touch with your previous employers, write a post , congrats them on their birthdays and work anniversary , this will help in good relation with all professional’s

Recruitment Challenges In 2015

Recruitment Challenges In 2015

There has been a huge difference between supply and demand of the experienced candidates which makes the hiring environment quite competitive in 2015. With the consideration that more talent does not mean employable talent we have been through the candidates with high talent skills but the dearth of employable talent. As per the Morpheus Human Consulting Survey Research, hiring competition is expected to increase by 65% in the coming years. Following Hiring Challenges are faced by Recruitment Consultants in 2015 as compared to previous years:

 Executive Level Hiring:

Recruiting the senior level management has always been a challenge due to the diverse opportunities available in the market. Top talent candidates are always in demand and hence whenever they are out in the market for the job change other employers hire them readily without second thought and they are with the offer letter in hand as quick as wink. HR Recruitment Consultants at Morpheus Human Consulting has put the efforts in overcoming this challenge by making the job postings more SEO friendly compared to other employers so that when high talent is in need of job, the postings done by the recruiters of Morpheus Human Consulting will have good search engine score and this technique has known effective results.

Candidates Persuasion:

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Why Opt For Morpheus Human Consulting ?

why-opt-for-us


Morpheus Human Consulting is a leading Recruitment Consultancy in India, with more than 18 branches and around 150+ consultants in our recruiting team in India and the Middle East. We serve to a wide range of clients throughout India & across a variety of Industry sectors. It is our mission to provide effective recruitment solutions which enable our Clients to develop and achieve their objectives. We do this by being Innovative, Professional and Honorable in regards to every aspect of our Recruitment practice.
Our Vision is to build ethical recruitment partnerships based on trust, integrity and honesty. We focus on the best people and find them great environments to work in. We are dedicated to ensuring that our skilled and enthusiastic team focus on providing the very best service. That way, we build lasting relationships with our clients and candidates alike. Our recruiters provide bespoke consultancy tailored to your company, not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach, we understand what many agencies don’t, that quality and understanding matters. Our recruiting strategies help our client companies to meet the staffing and manpower demands of each individual project, and our fresh no-nonsense approach to recruiting means that we will deliver the right person for their vacancy on time and with the minimum disruption to your business.

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