Promoting yourself: the rules of success

Promoting yourself: the rules of success - Morpheus Consulting

A diligent and hard-working project manager at a global bank was known for meeting deadlines. A functional expert and a team player, she never hesitated to work beyond the designated hours. Self-evasive and reticent, she strongly believed that her work would speak louder than words to get her the recognition she deserved. Much to her dismay, however, she was passed over for a promotion that year.

Inherent excellence is not always enough to fetch recognition.

In his book Power: Why Some Have It And Some Don’t, Jeffrey Pfeffer, professor of organizational behaviour at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business, says it’s not enough to presume that success is based on the quality of your work and job performance alone. Potential sponsors need to know about your skills, competencies, accomplishments and experiences to be encouraged to make a positive difference to your career. You can share information on this so that you get career-enhancing opportunities “If you blend into the woodwork, no one will care about you, even if you are doing a great job. Being memorable equals getting picked,” says Pfeffer.

How to do it

Self-promotion is a delicate art because if you overdo it, you come across as a braggart, and if you underplay, you don’t get the accolades. “It needs to be subtle, responsible and balanced,” cautions Saket Kanoria, managing director, TCPL Packaging Ltd. “Self-promotion that takes the toxic shape of running down other people’s work, claiming credit which rightfully belongs elsewhere, and taking advantage of proximity to one’s manager, may fetch short-term gains, but will undoubtedly prove counter-productive in the long run,” adds Sunder Ram Korivi, dean, School for Securities Education, National Institute of Securities Markets, Navi Mumbai. There should be a line between gaining a following and becoming sickeningly self-promotional, especially if you don’t wan’t to be penalized for the latter.

Here are a few strategies to generate more visibility:

Prepare your story

A senior stakeholder you meet in the elevator enquires, “What’s up?”, and you respond with, “All well. Thanks!” Instead, you could have seized this opportunity to promote yourself by highlighting an accomplishment or two. For instance, “We successfully closed a record number of 248 transactions this month—25% above average.” Or, “I finished cross-training on process ABC. I am now conversant with a range of processes in the system.” The trick lies in being prepared with your story, and arming yourself with data points that you can reel off at the drop of a hat.

Redefine self-promotion

Since promoting one’s accomplishments goes against the value of modesty ingrained in us, let’s first rethink the definition of self-promotion. “Just as the objective of marketing a product is to generate awareness about its key benefits to help customers make sound decisions, think of self-promotion as a responsible communication of your talents and accomplishment to those who can leverage and benefit from this information, thus making it a win-win proposition,” says Darshana Ogale, chief operating officer, S P Jain School of Global Management.

In his 2014 book Promote Yourself: The New Rules For Career Success, author Dan Schawbel highlights the disconnect between what managers look for when deciding on promotions (a positive attitude and the ability to prioritize) and what employees think managers want (communication skills and leadership ability). So, it is important to showcase a range of abilities instead of coming across as one-dimensional.

Clothe it in anecdotes

Share your success in the form of a story. Instead of saying that you did an awesome job negotiating a successful deal with a tough customer, share your strategy and challenges in cracking the deal, enabling your team to learn from your experience. Engage with humility, focus on facts, and ensure that those stories are relevant, says Dorie Clark, in a Harvard Business Review article, How To Promote Yourself Without Looking Like A Jerk.

“Align your story with the context and the audience. Share it with a genuine belief that it is relevant to the audience, rather than with a mindset of promoting yourself. Authenticity matters,” says Atul Srivastava, chief executive officer, Effective People, a Mumbai-based human resources consulting and training company.

impactful introduction

When called upon to introduce yourself at an external conference, an internal training programme or to a visiting global practice head, go beyond the vanilla introduction encompassing your role, designation and experience. Make your introduction audience-centric and impactful by incorporating elements that differentiate and lend a recall value. For instance, something like, “I am an avid trekker, I did the Everest base camp trek last year,” is likely to stick in the minds of the audience. “A compelling introduction at an event, almost always an outcome of serious introspection and practice, certainly helps you make an impact. In fact, sometimes just asking a question at a conference or a seminar gets you noticed, and works towards your promotion,” says Srivastava.

Engage beyond your core work

As the organization expands, it is not easy to get noticed outside your immediate circle. “Participating in forums outside my core work, like knowledge-sharing forums, organizational committees, corporate social responsibility initiatives, diversity, etc. has gone a long way in helping me garner visibility and connect with people beyond my operational network,” says Ogale.

Communicate with your manager

“Proactively meeting your manager not only to seek feedback, but also to apprise him of your accomplishments, challenges and aspirations is important. While a manager is likely to be aware of your big-ticket items, your differentiator may lie in some of your smaller achievements,” says Korivi. So tracking your accomplishments and feeding your manager with regular updates would be mutually beneficial—it would not only help you promote yourself, but also offer your manager data points to identify areas where you could contribute. Managing others’ perceptions about your accomplishments separates workplace winners from those who don’t move up the ladder, says Pfeffer.

Engage on social media

Soumitra Dutta, professor at the Institut Européen d’Administration des Affaires (Insead), a graduate business school, and writer of the Harvard Business Review article Managing Yourself: What’s Your Personal Social Media Strategy?, strongly advocates embracing the social media as a platform for promoting yourself, building your personal brand and engaging with stakeholders by communicating who you are. “Active participation on social media is a powerful tool—the difference between leading effectively and ineffectively, and between advancing and faltering in the pursuit of your goals,” says Prof. Dutta.

Start with posting an impactful profile, portraying your expertise by engaging in discussion forums, posting articles and commenting on posts, thus creating visibility for yourself. “I have found that leveraging the organization’s intranet is a great way of getting your story before your audience,” says Ogale.

Reverse promotion

When you promote others, guided by the principle of reciprocity, they promote you in return. This reverse promotion, besides enhancing your visibility and highlighting your achievements, also helps you build relationships and earn goodwill. So, be open to connecting with people, learning about, and promoting, their talents and achievements.

Source: http://bit.ly/2ArpFJH

12 Things to Never Do During A Phone Interview

These days, phone interviews are an unavoidable part of the job interview process, and for good reason: They save everyone involved time and effort. But that doesn’t mean that phones require zero energy on the part of the candidate. Yes, you should spend more time preparing for an in-person interview, but many companies treat phone screens as the official first round of the hiring process. That means candidates are expected to go into them prepared with as much information about the company, position, and their own skills and strengths as possible.

We asked HR pros about their top phone interview pet peeves, they had no shortage of advice to offer. Apparently, it’s quite easy to mess up your phone interview. But here’s the thing; it’s also not hard to come across well if you keep some key things in mind.

1. Never Take The Interview Somewhere Noisy

It might seem like common sense, but you’d be surprised what interviewers say they can hear in the background of their phone interviews—everything from barking dogs to screaming children. “Prepare for the interview by securing a quiet space in advance, even if it means escaping to your car parked in the garage,” advises Chere Taylor, founder of Fulcrum HR Consulting. “If you can lock your home office door, by all means do it. We’ve all been there and sometimes things just happen, but the more time spent anticipating what could go wrong, the better prepared and organized you will appear to the interviewer and the greater likelihood of success.” That doesn’t mean that if your washing machine beeps once in the background all hope is lost, but the more effort you put into being in a quiet place, the more focused you’ll be.

2. Don’t Talk About Your Personal Life

…Unless you’re directly asked a question about what you like to do in your off hours. “The point of a phone interview is to focus on getting to know a candidate’s  work experience and goals,” says Mckenzie Roark, campus talent specialist at Lithko Contracting. “A recruiter is trying to qualify them to see if they are the best fit for a role, and learning about their personal life doesn’t help. For example, when asked where you see yourself in five years, we don’t want to know that you hope to be married or that you want to buy a new house. That is nice but that isn’t relative to anything professional.”

3. Resist The Urge to Multitask

It might be tempting to cross something off your to-do list while on a phone interview, but recruiters and hiring managers can easily tell if your attention is elsewhere. “My number one pet peeve is people who decide to multitask while on the phone interview,” says Dan Krupansky, Talent Acquisition Manager at PrimePay. “I have heard candidates washing dishes, making lunch in the microwave, going for walks, letting their dog out, and grocery shopping during the interview. I even had one person use the bathroom and flush the toilet while speaking with me.” Needless to say, this doesn’t reflect well on your level of interest in the position you’re interviewing for.

4. Skip The Money Conversation

To put it bluntly, it’s simply too early in the process for you to be the one who brings up salary expectations. “Chances are if a candidate is participating in a phone interview, this is the first time they have talked with the company, and the first call isn’t the appropriate time to talk about ‘what’s in it for you,’” says Justina Strnad, the Talent Acquisition Manager for Shiftgig. “Trust me, if you are a great candidate and make it to next steps, the hiring team is going to be very transparent about what’s in it for you later on!”

5. Never Put Your Interviewer On Hold

Phone interviews don’t take that long, and there probably isn’t anything else going on that is really truly so urgent that you need to pause your interview. “Do not put me on hold to take an important call that just beeped in,” advises Jeremy Payne, head of people operations at Remote Year. “I am your important call. If you are expecting extremely urgent news (like information about a family illness), be sure to preface that in the early minutes of the interview, so the recruiter is aware of the situation and so you can work with them to reschedule if that interruption does occur,” he says.

6. Never Skip The Q&A

“After wrapping up a phone interview, it is typical that the interviewer will ask the candidate if they have any questions. I can’t stress this enough: ALWAYS ask questions,” says Roark. “If we have had a great phone interview and then we wrap up and they don’t have any questions for me, it pretty much ruins the whole interview. It tells me that the candidate is uninterested in the role, which in reality, might not be the case at all,” she notes. But surely, if you’re interested in a job, you can think of something to ask your interviewer.

7. Don’t Be Late

It seems basic, but surprisingly, a lot of people are late to phone interviews. “About a quarter of the people with whom I schedule phone interviews aren’t on time,” says Sophie Cikovsky, who handles U.S. recruiting for Infinite Global. “While this bothers me personally, it’s also indicative of someone who isn’t very detail-oriented,” she explains. “In order to identify this early in the hiring process, I started asking all candidates a few years ago to call me as opposed to calling them at an agreed upon time. That way if I hear from them at 1:13pm or 12:49pm instead of our planned 1:00 pm interview time, I have an early indicator that they might not be a great fit.”

8. Don’t Assume Reception Is Good

“Make sure you test your headset and connection before dialing in,” recommends Payne. “There is nothing more frustrating for a recruiter who has a structured interview guide in place having to repeatedly ask the same question over and over because they could not understand your answer due to static or dropped signals.” Test call a friend beforehand or even call yourself from a landline if necessary; it will take less than a minute.

9. Never Talk Over The Interviewer

You might be eager to get your point across or talk about your experience, but interrupting the interviewer is awkward and rude when you’re speaking on the phone, even more so than in face-to-face interviews. “Interviewing can be stressful and sometimes that stress manifests itself in speaking too fast, speaking too loud, talking over the interviewer, or attempting to answer the interviewer’s question before they have actually finished asking the question,” says Taylor. “Don’t do this.” There’s a big difference between being assertive and being aggressive, and interviewers can always recognize it.

10. Skip Filler Words

It’s tough not to say things like “um,” “uh,” and “like” in everyday speech, but these verbal habits become much more pronounced when speaking on the phone, says Chris Dardis, a recruiting expert and HR professional with Versique Executive Search. “In face-to-face interviews, they’re not as noticeable because there are other things like your hair, suit, or body language to distract people,” he explains. But in a phone interview, the only thing you have to go on is what you say and how you say it. “That’s why it’s so important to eliminate these words from your speech when doing a phone interview.”

11. Don’t Go In Blind

Not knowing anything about the company or job you’re interviewing for is way more obvious than you’d think. “Many people think that a phone interview means they’re getting away with something, that they don’t have to put as much effort into researching the role or company,” says Steve Pritchard, HR Consultant for giffgaff. And if you have your laptop in front of you during the interview to do a few quick searches, they won’t know the difference, right? Not exactly. “Seasoned interviewers will know whether an interviewee is researching while on the phone; they will take too long to answer the question and punctuate their answers with a lot of ‘ums’ and ‘errs’ as they type. The interviewer can often even hear the typing as they ask the question,” he adds.

12. Nix Long-Winded Answers

“The key to success during a phone interview is clear and concise answers,” says Dardis. “People’s attention spans tend to be shorter over the phone. You don’t want your future employer to lose interest in the conversation.” He recommends practicing answers to questions you know will be asked ahead of time in order to be clear on what you’re going to say. That way, you can prevent rambling before it starts.

Source: http://bit.ly/2gCaCrs

‘Blind Hiring’ Slowly Gaining Ground In India

 

To avoid biases related to region and gender, among others, organisations are now plumping for a ‘blind hiring’ strategy – where the focus is on recruiting a candidate with the right skill set – say industry experts. Blind hiring is a process of recruitment where the premium is on skills and abilities rather than on soft skills, culture-fit and factors like region and gender. “This method is slowly gaining ground in India, especially when a number of vacancies are to be filled and the role is at the entry level,” CIEL HR Services CEO Aditya Narayan Mishra told news agency Press Trust of India here.

However, he said mid to senior roles call for a good assessment of culture fit and the applicants want face to face interactions with their potential boss.

“Given the impact a mid-level or a senior role produces in an organisation, it is important that the best get hired and the offered candidate has a realistic preview of the job. Hence, blind hiring is not practised for these roles yet,” he added.

Making a similar point, TeamLease Services vice-president-recruitment services Ajay Shah opined that blind hiring will lead to impartial selection, personal bias removal, gender parity, workplace diversity and development of a skill-based meritocratic organisation.

“Corporate India is already seeing dearth in employable talent and this may also be due to its conventional methods and expectations. Adoption of this method will definitely bring in a different perspective and will increase the scope of talent pool in India,” he explained.

However, he said, as firms in India have been using conventional recruitment or interviews for years, this radical change on hiring will have its own challenges and a large workforce might make it more time-consuming and bulky.

Michael Page India director Anshul Lodha said this concept will work well for large business houses in India, large financial services companies and any organisation that is looking to hire mid-level employees in a large capacity.

“Speaking from experience, blind hiring is suitable for candidates who are applying for mid- to senior-level jobs as opposed to entry-level ones. For instance, in cases of campus recruitment, it is essential to take into consideration the educational background of the candidate to understand and gauge their level of exposure,” he added.

According to GlobalHunt managing director Sunil Goel, this has usually been followed partially where company do contract hiring for skilled workforce to complete task with specific skills.

“This trend will be more evident in technology and new age businesses targeting those segments who do not want long term commitment with the firm,” he added.

Source: http://bit.ly/2xV9Zfw

Seven reasons why home working is the future..!!

Commuters using bus, train or cabs very morning faced major delays following a loss of all signalling in most of the cities.

Train services are expected to be cancelled, buses are delayed. 

Travel disruption is one of the many reasons why there is a strong case for employers to shift towards flexible working for employees, specifically working from home.

But there are a whole host of other benefits to home working, particularly from a health and well being perspective. Below, we look at the seven reasons why home working is the future.

1. Reduction in commuting time:

Not only is commuting often stressful and unpleasant, it also take up time that could otherwise be spent working or doing something else productive. 

Employees who can work from home will also spend less money on petrol or train fares, which may give them less of an incentive to ask for a salary boost to cover travel expenses.

2. More productivity:

Many people who work from home claim to be more productive because they’re not in a loud environment or distracted by co-workers.

In fact, according to a Canada Life survey, homeworkers rank their productivity as 7.7/10, compared with 6.5/10 for office workers. 

A spokesperson for employment agency Reed said: “There are some obvious advantages of working from home that you’ve probably heard before – avoid the nightmare commute, work in your PJs – but the benefits go beyond that.

“Working from home can really help to increase your productivity, as the absence of office distractions makes it easier to keep your head down and actually get your work done.”

3. Fewer sick days:

The survey also found, unsurprisingly, that home workers took fewer days off sick than those based in the office.

Employees working in an office took on average 3.1 days of sick leave last year, whilst homeworkers only took 1.8 sick days, Canada Life found.

That’s because employees who have a cold or are mildly sick can still get work done at home, while office workers are more inclined to take the entire day off to avoid leaving the comfort of their home.

In addition, the better work-life balance means workers are less likely to get ill in the first place because their stress levels are typically lower.

4. Improved employee retention:

As well as employees generally being happier when they work from home – which means they are less likely to quit – parents with childcare responsibilities are also more likely to continue working for the company if they can work from home, as it gives them greater flexibility.

Plus, because working from home is seen as such as an attractive work perk, employees who have experienced it are less likely to leave for a firm that doesn’t offer flexible working.

Mariano Mamertino, EMEA economist at global job site Indeed, said: “Flexibility is high up the wishlist for employees of all ages – from new parents who need to juggle work with childcare, to older workers.

“But younger workers in particular see it as essential. Digital natives often expect to be able to harness the flexibility that technology provides, to enable them to work whenever and wherever suits them.”

5.  Increased talent pool:

By having employees who work from home, companies can hire the best talent regardless of who or where they are.

It means employers can work with people who don’t live in the UK, or who have a disability so may not be able to travel to an office.

One of the recruitment agency said:  “From the employer’s perspective, offering flexible working is a powerful way to access wider pools of talent – whether that’s Britain’s sizeable older workforce, or millennials who place greater emphasis on work-life balance than previous generations.”

6. Time to go to appointments:

Working from home allows workers to go to necessary appointments – the doctor’s, dentist or opticians – during their lunch break, which they may not have time for if they’re office based.

It also means employees can exercise or do stretches while at home, which they may feel embarrassed about doing at work – but is important for preventing back or joint problems which can come about as a result of a 9-to-5 job.

All this means improved health for employees, which in turn means employers are less likely to lose workers to sick or stress leave.

7. Less money spent on office space

If employees work from home, companies can spend less money on office space, technology and supplies. By staggering employees’ work-from-home days and hot-desking, firms can massively save on office space, which can cost thousands of pounds a month and be a major drain on a company’s budget.


Source: http://bit.ly/2tFw8Ri

Top 10 Reasons To Buy a Franchise

Striving for new goals is a motivating way to get yourself out of the current economic funk. For many people, these goals include the desire to start their own business and become the master of their destiny, and franchising can fit very well into that picture.

Here are the top 10 reasons to select a franchise opportunity if you want to own your own business.

1. Track Record of Success. Any good franchise company has developed a method of doing business that works well and produces successful results. Even better, they’re required to provide you with a great deal of information in their required disclosures so you can investigate and verify the results with existing franchisees prior to making your final decision.

2. Strong Brand. One of the biggest advantages of franchising is that the company is building a brand on a regional or national basis that should have value in the eyes of customers you’re trying to attract.

3. Training Programs. A good franchise company has training programs designed to bring you up to speed on the most successful methods to run the business. They should also have reference materials to assist you in dealing with whatever comes up while you’re running your business.

4. Ongoing Operational Support. Franchise companies have staff dedicated to providing ongoing assistance to franchisees. You’re not alone when you’re building and running your business, and you can always call on experienced people when you hit a rough spot or want to share new ideas for growing the business.

5. Marketing Assistance. The franchise company has marketing assistance to provide you with proven tools and strategies for attracting and retaining customers. Usually, the staff helps you develop the actual marketing plans and budgets for your grand opening as well as your ongoing efforts to market your business effectively.

6. Real Estate Assistance. Most franchises have manuals and other documentation, as well as staff, to help you find the right site and negotiate the best possible deal on your site. This is a very important advantage that can hold costs down and provide the best possible chance of success in any site-driven business.

7. Construction Assistance. Franchise companies can also provide a wonderful benefit in helping you design the layout of the business and select the right contractors to do your build out, as well as making sure you get the exact mix of furniture and equipment you need to maximize the efficiency of your initial investment.

8. Purchasing Power. A good franchise can take advantage of the buying power of the entire system to negotiate prices for everything you need at significantly lower levels than you could achieve as an independent operator. This applies not only to initial furniture and equipment purchases, but also to the supplies, inventory, uniforms and everything else you’ll need on an ongoing basis.

9 & 10. Risk Avoidance. This one is so important that we’ll call it both 9 and 10! The biggest reason to buy a franchise is that, if you’re smart, it will help you avoid much of the risk of starting a new business. Make no mistake–you have to do your due diligence, but if you do, you can determine with a fair amount of certainty what happen if you become a new franchisee.

8 Rules for Succeeding as an Entrepreneur !!

Before I talk about how to succeed, I need to talk a bit about failure. In Silicon Valley, failure is lauded, especially fast failure. The theory is that you learn by your mistakes. Ironically, most of the people who have the created the most successful businesses had no real history in their market and even less so-called experience. Indeed, their very ignorance of the potential pitfalls seems to have been what enabled them to succeed. Walking a high wire, it seems, is much easier when you don’t think there’s a 100-foot drop on either side. Put another way, success is a function of our belief that we will succeed and our determination not to fail.


       Here are the 8 rules as an entrepreneur

1. People are more important than strategy:

If you focus on finding people you want to be with and who you think are talented, chances are you’ll come up with great ideas together that will work. If you start with an idea and then try and find the talent, chances are you will be putting a square peg in a round hole.

2. Know what customers really want:

Business school teaches the importance of listening to customers. That’s great if you know what to listen for. Sometimes customers don’t know what they need but can describe what they really want or what they hate. For example, people don’t want to buy gasoline, but they do want to be able to drive to the beach. Henry Ford has often been quoted as saying, “If I’d asked my customers what they wanted they’d have said faster horses.” Whether he said it or not, the point is a good one. What business you are in is driven by your ability to know what people really want, not what they say they want.

3. Market size is everything:

When VCs look at any investment, they will try to forecast the potential market. If the market is big enough, even a half decent company could get to be a decent size. Dominating a really small market may take ten times the effort. Work out how big your opportunity is and what piece of that market you think you could own.

4. Be the customer:

How many times have you seen employees acting against the interest of their company, because the rules of the company made them act that way? Billions of dollars are lost every year because employees do what they’ve been told to do, not what they think they should do. If you are constantly putting yourself in the shoes of the customer and listening to your staff, you will eliminate the craziness.

5. Don’t chase bad revenue:

When starting out, you want customers, but be wary of taking just anyone’s money. Some customers can be bad for business, especially in the services sector. If you take on customers that pay well but make your employees’ life hell, they’ll rightly quit and then you won’t have a business.

6. Understand your culture:

Businesses are like families; they have values and a way of being. These are often a function of the leader or founder’s values. As you grow, you need to be sure to involve people who share those values. For example, if your company has a laid-back, fun culture where you empower people and don’t take yourselves too seriously, then don’t hire people who want a corner office and an assistant. Culture can make or break a company. If you don’t know what your culture is, you’d better find out.

7. Timing is everything:

One of the biggest reasons businesses succeed or fail is a function of timing. Being in the right place at the right time matters. All of which goes to my first point about not fearing failure; in life, you don’t always know until you try.

8. Think about growth:

We have all wondered what we’d do if we won the lottery. When starting a business, you need to think about what happens if it actually takes off. How will you scale? Who would you hire tomorrow? Would you open up in another city? Would you franchise the business? If you are trying to build the airplane while flying it, don’t be surprised if you crash.

MORPHEUS HUMAN CONSULTING provides an Excellent Business Platform for Recruitment with Low Investment and Minimum Risk along with Reasonable ROI with the benefits of a Household Name and a dedicated Team supporting YOU with timely guidance on how to operate effectively.

Some Of Our Franchise Reviews:

1. All along my life I wanted to become an entrepreneur. Morpheus Human Consultant has given me a chance to accomplish the same. I chose MHC because I think its business model is unique and futuristic. My association with Morpheus is still in infancy. But I am really impressed by the concept behind “Talent Now” and professionalism being displayed by “Support Team”. – (Franchise Partner – Pune)

2. Working with Partner like you makes our business a great joy and to have own business after working for over 25 years in various industries gives satisfaction. The first year was not encouraging and went in loss but with the great provision from support team, Client Relationship Manager, Talent Acquisition Team we were able to understand the business and earned a great profit from our business. One more positive feedback that I would like to add is the total transparency in the work process. Thanks for your support. – (Franchise Partner – Mumbai)

3. I always wanted to balance my career and personal life without sacrificing my professional responsibilities and working with Morpheus helped me manage both the things. Working with Morpheus keeps me updated with the current job market scenario. To be frank, I have not got any financially benefit but haven’t loose also anything instead had great experience to start my own business in HR field. – (Franchise Partner – Delhi)

For Further details contact us on 022-40649800 or

email us on franchise@mhc.co.in

Morpheus Human Consulting Franchisee

morpheus-human-consulting-franchise-opportunity

Why Morpheus Human Consulting Franchise?

Morpheus Human Consulting Has:

  • Experience of more than 10 years in recruitment services and other HR Services.
  • Tied up with reputed companies from India and abroad.
  • Commercially and technically viable and proven project
  • Low investment and minimum risk
  • Reasonable ROI (Return On Investment)

Who will the Franchising appeal to?

  • Like-minded entrepreneurs who want to build their own HR Services business and want to benefit from established market name and know how.
  • Existing independent Recruitment consultants who want to access powerful network technology, a market leading website and retain an element of the goodwill associated with their particular name.
  • Existing Recruitment Company or Consultants seeking to fast track their own business, and use their Morpheus name to benefit from an established operating model and system.

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