QUALITIES THAT HR IS LOOKING IN NEW HIRES

QUALITIES THAT HR IS LOOKING IN NEW HIRES

Here are the some key qualities That HR look out in the new hires to ensure longevity of the tenure.

  1.  Endurance:

Turnovers can be expensive for HR. Hence the foremost qualities they look for in new hires are endurance, commitment and prospect of longevity of the tenure.

  1.  Team player:

Anybody can work in silos but it takes a lot of perseverance and high levels of patience and gratitude to work as a team player. Incidentally, all these qualities make for a good employee itself.

  1.   Ambitious:

Motivated and self-driven people are an asset to any organization. Ambitious employees work hard and try to surpass their own excellence, which in turn benefits the organization at large. Who doesn’t want to hire such employees?

  1.   Trustworthy:

Trust is a very tricky characteristic to identify in an employee. An employee who is true in his/her work and dependable is sure to have long-term benefits for the organizations and is most likely to stick around for long.

  1.    Positive attitude:

They say, if you have a positive attitude in life you are a sure winner. Organizations look out for such employees because they know such employees can stand up to failure and competition with much confidence.

  1.  Multi-tasking skills:

Businesses often resort to cost cutting by having fewer employees who can multi-task. With growing competition, multi-tasking is one of the desired quality HR looks for in new hires.

Promoting yourself: the rules of success

Promoting yourself: the rules of success - Morpheus Consulting

A diligent and hard-working project manager at a global bank was known for meeting deadlines. A functional expert and a team player, she never hesitated to work beyond the designated hours. Self-evasive and reticent, she strongly believed that her work would speak louder than words to get her the recognition she deserved. Much to her dismay, however, she was passed over for a promotion that year.

Inherent excellence is not always enough to fetch recognition.

In his book Power: Why Some Have It And Some Don’t, Jeffrey Pfeffer, professor of organizational behaviour at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business, says it’s not enough to presume that success is based on the quality of your work and job performance alone. Potential sponsors need to know about your skills, competencies, accomplishments and experiences to be encouraged to make a positive difference to your career. You can share information on this so that you get career-enhancing opportunities “If you blend into the woodwork, no one will care about you, even if you are doing a great job. Being memorable equals getting picked,” says Pfeffer.

How to do it

Self-promotion is a delicate art because if you overdo it, you come across as a braggart, and if you underplay, you don’t get the accolades. “It needs to be subtle, responsible and balanced,” cautions Saket Kanoria, managing director, TCPL Packaging Ltd. “Self-promotion that takes the toxic shape of running down other people’s work, claiming credit which rightfully belongs elsewhere, and taking advantage of proximity to one’s manager, may fetch short-term gains, but will undoubtedly prove counter-productive in the long run,” adds Sunder Ram Korivi, dean, School for Securities Education, National Institute of Securities Markets, Navi Mumbai. There should be a line between gaining a following and becoming sickeningly self-promotional, especially if you don’t wan’t to be penalized for the latter.

Here are a few strategies to generate more visibility:

Prepare your story

A senior stakeholder you meet in the elevator enquires, “What’s up?”, and you respond with, “All well. Thanks!” Instead, you could have seized this opportunity to promote yourself by highlighting an accomplishment or two. For instance, “We successfully closed a record number of 248 transactions this month—25% above average.” Or, “I finished cross-training on process ABC. I am now conversant with a range of processes in the system.” The trick lies in being prepared with your story, and arming yourself with data points that you can reel off at the drop of a hat.

Redefine self-promotion

Since promoting one’s accomplishments goes against the value of modesty ingrained in us, let’s first rethink the definition of self-promotion. “Just as the objective of marketing a product is to generate awareness about its key benefits to help customers make sound decisions, think of self-promotion as a responsible communication of your talents and accomplishment to those who can leverage and benefit from this information, thus making it a win-win proposition,” says Darshana Ogale, chief operating officer, S P Jain School of Global Management.

In his 2014 book Promote Yourself: The New Rules For Career Success, author Dan Schawbel highlights the disconnect between what managers look for when deciding on promotions (a positive attitude and the ability to prioritize) and what employees think managers want (communication skills and leadership ability). So, it is important to showcase a range of abilities instead of coming across as one-dimensional.

Clothe it in anecdotes

Share your success in the form of a story. Instead of saying that you did an awesome job negotiating a successful deal with a tough customer, share your strategy and challenges in cracking the deal, enabling your team to learn from your experience. Engage with humility, focus on facts, and ensure that those stories are relevant, says Dorie Clark, in a Harvard Business Review article, How To Promote Yourself Without Looking Like A Jerk.

“Align your story with the context and the audience. Share it with a genuine belief that it is relevant to the audience, rather than with a mindset of promoting yourself. Authenticity matters,” says Atul Srivastava, chief executive officer, Effective People, a Mumbai-based human resources consulting and training company.

impactful introduction

When called upon to introduce yourself at an external conference, an internal training programme or to a visiting global practice head, go beyond the vanilla introduction encompassing your role, designation and experience. Make your introduction audience-centric and impactful by incorporating elements that differentiate and lend a recall value. For instance, something like, “I am an avid trekker, I did the Everest base camp trek last year,” is likely to stick in the minds of the audience. “A compelling introduction at an event, almost always an outcome of serious introspection and practice, certainly helps you make an impact. In fact, sometimes just asking a question at a conference or a seminar gets you noticed, and works towards your promotion,” says Srivastava.

Engage beyond your core work

As the organization expands, it is not easy to get noticed outside your immediate circle. “Participating in forums outside my core work, like knowledge-sharing forums, organizational committees, corporate social responsibility initiatives, diversity, etc. has gone a long way in helping me garner visibility and connect with people beyond my operational network,” says Ogale.

Communicate with your manager

“Proactively meeting your manager not only to seek feedback, but also to apprise him of your accomplishments, challenges and aspirations is important. While a manager is likely to be aware of your big-ticket items, your differentiator may lie in some of your smaller achievements,” says Korivi. So tracking your accomplishments and feeding your manager with regular updates would be mutually beneficial—it would not only help you promote yourself, but also offer your manager data points to identify areas where you could contribute. Managing others’ perceptions about your accomplishments separates workplace winners from those who don’t move up the ladder, says Pfeffer.

Engage on social media

Soumitra Dutta, professor at the Institut Européen d’Administration des Affaires (Insead), a graduate business school, and writer of the Harvard Business Review article Managing Yourself: What’s Your Personal Social Media Strategy?, strongly advocates embracing the social media as a platform for promoting yourself, building your personal brand and engaging with stakeholders by communicating who you are. “Active participation on social media is a powerful tool—the difference between leading effectively and ineffectively, and between advancing and faltering in the pursuit of your goals,” says Prof. Dutta.

Start with posting an impactful profile, portraying your expertise by engaging in discussion forums, posting articles and commenting on posts, thus creating visibility for yourself. “I have found that leveraging the organization’s intranet is a great way of getting your story before your audience,” says Ogale.

Reverse promotion

When you promote others, guided by the principle of reciprocity, they promote you in return. This reverse promotion, besides enhancing your visibility and highlighting your achievements, also helps you build relationships and earn goodwill. So, be open to connecting with people, learning about, and promoting, their talents and achievements.

Source: http://bit.ly/2ArpFJH

5 BODY LANGUAGE DISASTERS JOB SEEKERS MAKE DURING AN INTERVIEW

Not making eye contact

Failing to make eye contact was the body language mistake interviewers were most likely to say they hated. Sixty-seven percent of people surveyed said they didn’t like it when candidates kept their eyes cast down. While you don’t want to get into a creepy staring contest with your interviewer, looking at them while listening and speaking shows you’re engaged in the conversation

Playing with something on the table

Thirty-four percent of hiring managers cited fiddling with pens or shuffling papers as a major example of poor body language in an interview. Clicking a pen or similar gestures can be interpreted as a sign of anxiety.

Crossing your arms

Crossing your arms in front of your chest makes you look defensive and hostile, so it’s no wonder that 32% of HR managers said this was not something they liked to see in people they interviewed.

Not sitting up straight

Slumping in your seat doesn’t convey confidence. Thirty-one percent of HR experts said it made candidates look less than polished in an interview. Sitting up straight and squaring your shoulders not only makes you look confident, but it also shows you respect your interviewer and the situation you’re in.

Using too many hand gestures

The higher the gesture, the more out-of-control you look. The key in an interview is balance: Some hand movement keeps you from coming off as too stiff, but too much and you could look like a loose cannon.

6 Steps for a Career Makeover..!!

Are you tired of feeling dragged down by your work and have you wanted to make a change but haven’t done anything about it? As years progress, career progression plateaus. You will need to keep improvising and constantly innovating your career strategy to keep growing.

Everyone deserves to have a job that makes them want to jump out of bed in the morning. It takes time and commitment to make this happen, but it is possible.

Your career graph has to keep constantly moving forward, to keep pace with the changing times around you. If you are in the same position, role, or even the city for a really long time, chances are you will be reductant over time. Either technology or someone young and smarter, will do your job for half the pay.

Every career has various infection points. Your first job, your first promotion, the first time you lead a team, a whole function, could be a few.

All of us need career makeovers at each of these infection points. This makeover will kick-start the trajectory at your next goal. The time of these makeovers and the infection points could be different for each one of us. However the makeover is something we all have to go through, to be ahead of the game.

Here are 6 steps for a career makeover:

1) Decide on the next stage:  

The first step is to decide on what is next. This sets the next destination, and all the time frame for reaching the goal. Make sure thisgoal is the next important thing for you.

2) Schedule and follow Schedule:

Almost all successful people in the world have a schedule. They have the schedule like white on rice. It is not list of “To do”, or a bucket list. Successful people are sticklers of a plan and schedule. Everything in their day has a time pre-booked. Make time for the things that will help reach your next IT, and do it in your most productive hours.

3) Invest in yourself:

Learn. Constant learning is the key to your success. Whatever you decide to do, keep learning. Get certified, work as an intern to gain experience. What it takes, Learn. The minute you feel you know a thing or two about something, learn the next big thing.

4) Meet people in your group:

In today’s connected world, it is a sin not to network. Connecting with like-minded people, will open up a world of possibilities. With a large network of people you can reach out for help. You will be able to get to your goals faster.

However, networking is NOT about asking the other person for help. It also means you will need to add value to the relationship and be willing to help. When you reach out to someone, make sure you find common ground and hold out the offer to help.

5) Talk about your plans:

Be willing to talk to every relevant person,seek feedback, and face rejections. These conversations will expand your horizon about your idea.

6) Overcome your fear, Visualize your future:

Finally, at the end of the day, when you are ready and convinced about your ideas or plans, be ready to overcome your fear of failure. Visualize how the future will be, and where you see the next step heading. Sometimes this is driven by data and at times, it is a leap of faith. Which is your path, take the plunge!

5 Powerful Steps to Improve Employee Engagement

Today more than ever, organizations rely on the energy, commitment and engagement of their workforce in order to survive and thrive in the twenty-first century. As a former Nany SEAL, I can assure you that one of the fundamental reasons we continue to dominate our battlefield and defeat a very dangerous and decentralized enemy is due to the fact that we have 100% employee engagement. We have ecosystems of empowered teams that are fully engaged and working in a “decentralized command” environment.

According to Gallup’s State of the Global Workplace report, only 15% of employees worldwide are engaged in their jobs – meaning that they are emotionally invested in committing their time, talent and energy in adding value to their team and advancing the organization’s initiatives. More Gallop research shows that employee disengagement costs the United States upwards of $550 billion a year in lost productivity. So one could see why this is both a serious problem that most leaders and managers face with today’s workforce – but also an amazing opportunity for companies that learn to master the art of engagement.

The current business environment, and the world in general, is moving faster than it ever has before. Organizations across the globe are faced with more change than most can handle – in order to compete and dominate their segment they are required to grow faster often giving them less time to focus on managing all of their financial goals. They are forced to grow quickly with fewer resource – to do more with less. Managers have to learn to excel in managing themselves, their teams and meeting organizational goals simultaneously.

It is a common understanding of a vast majority of leaders that the employees are a company’s most important asset. But in reality, that is only true when the majority of the workforce is fully engaged in their work. If not, they are either adding minimal value or actively working against the organization.

There are three types of employees in any organization:

Engaged (15% of the workforce). These employees are loyal and emotionally committed to the organization. They are in roles where they excel and where their talents are truly leveraged. They enthusiastically invest in their work and take on responsibilities outside of their job description. They are generally more likely to become emerging leaders and will stay with an organization much longer then disengaged employees.

Not Engaged (67% of the workforce). These employees can be difficult to identify because they are often relatively happy and satisfied in their role. However, they do the bare minimum and are not invested in the company’s mission, vision, values or goals. They are less likely to be customer-focused and are not concerned about productivity or company profitability. These team members are both a threat and great opportunity – because with the proper approach, they can be transformed into engaged employees that thrive in the organization.

Actively Disengaged (18% of the workforce). We have all worked alongside these people. They are consistently negative, create a toxic environment, dominate their manager’s time and are usually vocal about their unhappiness. What’s worse, is they are often subject matter experts well-respected in their unique skillset. And because of that, they often have significant influence over others. These employees can easily spread toxicity throughout an organization and can rarely be transformed into true “A” players.

Most studies point to the fact that employee engagement has a direct impact on productivity and profitability. That seems self-evident, yet many managers still struggle to define, measure and improve engagement in their teams.

The Leader’s Role in Engagement

Leaders improve engagement by defining and communicating a powerful vision for the organization. They hire and develop managers that are emotionally invested in the organization’s mission and vision and give them the resources to build great teams with the right people in the right roles. They empower.

The Manager’s Role in Engagement

Great managers ensure they acquire and develop great talent – they get the right people on the bus and make sure they are in the right seats. They actively prioritize engagement. Their team’s activities align perfectly behind the mission narrative of the organization.

In many of my articles, I dive deep in to the methodologies, tools and strategies leaders and managers need to successfully navigate the murky waters of twenty-first century organizational transformation – for leading change. I showcase how to build a culture that is more nimble and adaptive founded on the principles of trust and accountability. The issue at hand is with such low engagement in the workforce, it is very difficult to create a culture of trust and accountability.

70% of organizational transformation efforts fall significantly short of realizing the company’s goals. Why? Because change is hard, takes longer and usually has higher hard and soft costs than managers and leaders generally plan for. Change can be intensely personal for employees, causes fear and can actually reduce productivity when approached improperly.

Humans are emotional creatures – and most managers hold the misconception that their team members are largely rational in their decision-making process. Yet studies show that we base 70% of our decisions on emotional factors and only 30% on rational factors. But this can also be a great way to improve engagement. Improving engagement is simple – but clearly not easy. Here’s how.

5 Powerful Steps to Improve Employee Engagement

How do managers know who is engaged? Their team members need to be able to confidently state the following:

  • I know what is expected of me and my work quality.
  • I have the resources and training to thrive in my role.
  • I have the opportunity to do what I do best – every day.
  • I frequently receive recognition, praise and constructive criticism.
  • I trust my manager and believe they have my best interests in mind.
  • My voice is heard and valued.
  • I clearly understand the mission and purpose and how I contribute to each.
  • I have opportunities to learn and grow both personally and professionally.

The steps for improving engagement aren’t complex, they simply must be prioritized. Which means engagement must be a core function of the manager’s role.

All else then falls into place.

Step 1 – Put Everyone in the Right Role

Again, get the right people on the bus and make sure they are in the right roles. This means that all talent acquisition and retention strategies have to be aligned with meeting company goals.

Step 2 – Give Them the Training

No manager or leader can expect to build a culture of trust and accountability – and much less improve engagement – without setting the team up for success. This means providing the proper training and development while removing obstacles.

Step 3 – Task Meaningful Work

Engaged employees are doing meaningful work and have a clear understanding of how they contribute to the company’s mission, purpose and strategic objectives. Again, this is why they first have to be placed in the right role. I’ve made the mistake of hiring great talent just to get them in the door – but didn’t have a clear career path or role for them. If you don’t sort those details out quickly, they will leave.

Step 4 – Check in Often

The days of simply relying on mid-year reviews for providing feedback are long gone. Today’s workforce craves regular feedback – which of course leads to faster course correction and reduces waste. Use both formal and informal check-in strategies – and use them every week.

Step 5 – Frequently Discuss Engagement

Successful managers are transparent in their approach to improving engagement – they talk about it with their teams all the time. They hold “state of engagement” meetings and “engage” everyone in the discussion – and solutions.

Again, these principles are not complex, but must be prioritized. Companies that get this right will drive greater financial returns, surpass their competitors and easily climb to the top of “the best places to work” lists.

8 Reasons why Powerful Personal Brand Will Make You Successful !

If you don’t have a powerful and visible personal brand, you are putting yourself at a disadvantage in almost every aspect of your professional, business and personal life. Personal branding has become a requirement for anyone looking to grow their business, get a better job, get noticed by the press, take their career to the next level or meet new, high quality friends.

Personal branding is the practice of people marketing themselves and their careers as brands — the ongoing process of establishing a prescribed image or impression in the mind of others about an individual. Everyone has a unique personal brand, whether they know it or not. But what we should all be striving for is a powerful, attractive and visible personal brand. I define that as an online and in-person authentic display of the engaging aspects of your professional and personal activities and interests.

Here are the eight reasons why I tell people you must have a top-notch personal brand if you want to be successful today:

1. Opportunity finds you.

When your personal brand is attractive, customers, clients, vendors, press and even companies looking to hire, will find you and reach out to you. I am the CEO of a new social media platform, and I had them contact me for the job. I didn’t even know the position was available. I have gotten media appearances, writing opportunities and speaking engagements because I get noticed and folks reach out to me.

2. Online networking power.

When you have a compelling personal brand, people find you interesting and desirable, so they are willing to connect with you. I get dozens of new LinkedIn and Twitter connections every day. People look at my profiles, follow me and want to know more about me.

3. In-person networking power.

When I’m at a networking event and I engage others, I have many aspects of my brand to share. It makes me more interesting than the guy who walks up to you and says, “Hi, My name is Joe, and I sell insurance.” I have many facets to my brand, both professional and personal. That makes people want to connect with me and do business with me. I can demonstrate proficiency and have the online assets to back them up on many topics like photography, entrepreneurship, my Man-Up Project and fatherhood, blogging, speaking, social media, men’s health, non-profit work and more.

4. Build your business.

When I had to reinvent and rebuild my photography business in 2007, which was failing because of the rapid decline of film, it was my powerful personal brand that drove much of our success. Customers, clients and vendors are more likely to do businesses with a company when the leader has a killer personal brand. Good examples are Richard Branson, Elon Musk, Mark Cuban, Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates, Fred Smith, Warren Buffet and even Donald Trump — whose personal brand may be bigger than his business. Where would their companies be without their personal brands shining on their company brands?

5. Get hired.

According to SHRM, 84 percent of hiring managers use social media to hire — 96 percent use Linkedin, and 53 percent use Twitter. Many companies post jobs on Twitter before anywhere else. But the most revealing statistic is that 66 percent of hiring managers use Facebook to hire. They are doing that because they are trying to find out more about you than just what’s on your resume. They want to know you as a person and understand whether you are going to fit into their corporate culture.

It’s a logical approach for selecting the best candidates. Candidate A has an impressive resume. Candidate B has a similarly impressive resume, but their strong personal brand shows that they have a blog with articles on topics relevant to the company’s business. They tweet about news and ideas from the industry. They do yoga, run half-marathons, and they volunteer for charity. Who do you think is getting the interview and the job?

6. Make new friends.

A powerful personal brand doesn’t only benefit you professionally. When you are interesting and people can find and notice you, they will connect with you on a personal level. I have had people read an article I have written or see one of my social posts and reach out to me. I’ve become friends with many of them, and I might even admit that I have gotten a few dates from my “attractive” personal brand.

7. Serendipitous success.

When you are out there with your powerful and attractive personal brand good things happen — sometimes just by luck. There have been too-many-times-to-remember when simply being noticed for one part of my brand caused something else to happen. The person who noticed my popular Facebook account and reached out to me — she became my executive assistant. The doctor who found about my upcoming book — we ended up doing men’s health videos together and have become good friends. The senior executive and one of my company’s vendors saw my engaged social media and decided to give my company an exclusive on a new product launch.

8. Confidence.

Developing your personal brand requires you to find your authentic voice. The process of creating one develops who you are — the unique you — the Me, Inc. When you find your voice, and your audiences start to react positively, that builds self-confidence and self-esteem and allows you to find yourself in a meaningful way.

Source: http://bit.ly/2nEGAUT

Three Traits Recruiters Find Most Desirable In Face-to-Face Job Interviews

Recruiters and hiring managers have always considered conversational skills an important trait in new hires, but a new survey now places communication at the very top of the list.

The recruiting software company, Jobvite, together with Zogby Analytics, has just released its 2017 Recruiter Nation Report. The online survey of 831 recruiters in the U.S. is intended to identify the traits and qualities that recruiters evaluate to make the perfect hire—and the qualities they consider deal breakers, too.

Recruiters were asked the following question: “Which of the following positively impact your decision to hire a candidate during an initial in-person interview?” The question was a followed by a list of ‘subjective traits’ such as: appearance, punctuality, portfolio, conversation skills, industry knowledge and enthusiasm. According to recruiters, the most desirable traits are (in order):

1). Conversational skills (69% of recruiters said this is most important quality they look for in a job candidate)

2). Knowledge of industry

3). Enthusiasm

According to recruiters, a candidate’s ability to articulate their ideas effectively in conversation is a measure of their capacity to engage with others, a window into how the job candidate might interact with team members, clients and customers should they be hired.

Interestingly, the survey showed a generation gap among recruiters and the premium they place on conversational skills. For example, millennial recruiters place more of an emphasis on conversational skills than those recruiters over 50. A full 75% of millennials value communication skills as their top priority compared to 60% of those recruiters over 50, who place a greater emphasis on industry knowledge.

According to the survey, recruiters have seen it all— the good, the bad and the downright strange. For example, most recruiters say they’ve interviewed job candidates who didn’t know what company they were interviewing for. And a full 75% of recruiters say they’ve had candidates who dress “too casual,” which is a good reminder to dress a little better than you would for a normal day at the office.

Some qualities are subjective, of course, but the following actions are universal deal breakers, according to the survey. In other words, a majority of recruiters agreed that these actions would automatically disqualify a candidate:

  • Being rude to the receptionist or support staff
  • Checking phones during the interview
  • Showing up late
  • Bad hygiene

Communication skills will set you apart in a job interview. As I wrote in a previous article, many recruiters will openly admit that if they had to choose between two candidates with equal credentials, they are more likely to give the job to the person who can communicate better with colleagues and customers. Credentials and experience are no longer enough. Yes, they might get you through the door, but how you present yourself when you’re in the room still counts the most.

Source: http://bit.ly/2xoQIUD

‘Blind Hiring’ Slowly Gaining Ground In India

 

To avoid biases related to region and gender, among others, organisations are now plumping for a ‘blind hiring’ strategy – where the focus is on recruiting a candidate with the right skill set – say industry experts. Blind hiring is a process of recruitment where the premium is on skills and abilities rather than on soft skills, culture-fit and factors like region and gender. “This method is slowly gaining ground in India, especially when a number of vacancies are to be filled and the role is at the entry level,” CIEL HR Services CEO Aditya Narayan Mishra told news agency Press Trust of India here.

However, he said mid to senior roles call for a good assessment of culture fit and the applicants want face to face interactions with their potential boss.

“Given the impact a mid-level or a senior role produces in an organisation, it is important that the best get hired and the offered candidate has a realistic preview of the job. Hence, blind hiring is not practised for these roles yet,” he added.

Making a similar point, TeamLease Services vice-president-recruitment services Ajay Shah opined that blind hiring will lead to impartial selection, personal bias removal, gender parity, workplace diversity and development of a skill-based meritocratic organisation.

“Corporate India is already seeing dearth in employable talent and this may also be due to its conventional methods and expectations. Adoption of this method will definitely bring in a different perspective and will increase the scope of talent pool in India,” he explained.

However, he said, as firms in India have been using conventional recruitment or interviews for years, this radical change on hiring will have its own challenges and a large workforce might make it more time-consuming and bulky.

Michael Page India director Anshul Lodha said this concept will work well for large business houses in India, large financial services companies and any organisation that is looking to hire mid-level employees in a large capacity.

“Speaking from experience, blind hiring is suitable for candidates who are applying for mid- to senior-level jobs as opposed to entry-level ones. For instance, in cases of campus recruitment, it is essential to take into consideration the educational background of the candidate to understand and gauge their level of exposure,” he added.

According to GlobalHunt managing director Sunil Goel, this has usually been followed partially where company do contract hiring for skilled workforce to complete task with specific skills.

“This trend will be more evident in technology and new age businesses targeting those segments who do not want long term commitment with the firm,” he added.

Source: http://bit.ly/2xV9Zfw

Why Companies Opt for Recruitment Agency?

recruitment agency helps job seekers find employment,while also helping a company find the perfect person for the job they are advertising.

Companies will hire a recruitment agency so that they do not have to sort through, possibly, hundreds of applications for a job. These days, there are more and more people applying for the same position and companies do not have the time to sift through that many applications. They will therefore hire a recruitment agency to take care of this part of the process and to whittle the number of candidates down to a manageable level. Business owners and executives do not have the time and, in many cases, do not have the skills to find the perfect candidates, so outsourcing to a recruitment agency may be the best solution.

There are a number of benefits to using recruitment agencies for employers and potential employees; below are just a few:

  • Using a recruitment agency saves time. The hiring process can be very time consuming, and especially the initial stages of sorting through applications. With so many people applying for the same position, it is understandable for a company to want to avoid this part of the process. Running a company is time consuming enough without having to take time away from this to sort through large numbers of CV’s and application forms. Giving a recruitment agency the task of creating a shortlist of candidates for a position in a company is good business sense.
  • Some companies will use one recruitment agency to find the best person for their available position and will not advertise anywhere else. Failing to use recruitment agencies means that some candidates will not see these fantastic job advertisements and may miss the opportunity to work in a fantastic company with an excellent package.
  • Not only will recruitment agencies have the best jobs, they may also have access to the best candidates. Companies will benefit from the fact that a recruitment agency may have some of the best talent already registered on their books and it could mean finding the perfect candidate sooner rather than later.
  • There are many levels to the hiring process, including sorting through applications, interviewing, screening, and reference checks. A recruitment agency can take care of all of these steps bar the actual interview. By passing these processes to the recruitment agency, a company can ensure that it does not have to worry about calling previous employers for references or checking up on qualifications, etc. These jobs can all be taken care of by the agency before the interview, and that will give the employer peace of mind that the person they are interviewing has already passed the necessary checks.
  • A recruitment agency will want to make sure that the person they recommend for the position is the best person for the job. They will therefore be meticulous in their vetting process and will only choose candidates that they feel will do the job to the best of their ability. This gives employers the security that the candidate should be a good fit for the company.
  • A good recruitment agency can be used repeatedly for available positions within a company. Once they have found a successful candidate for a company, the company will feel confident that they will be able to do so again and it will take the worry out of the process. It means that when new positions become available, the agency will have the details they need and can find the perfect candidate as soon as possible.
  • Good recruitment agencies will work with both the client and the candidate and will try to help the candidate to make a good impression on the potential employer. This can be hugely beneficial to job seekers who are nervous about their interview.

Locating the Best Recruitment Agency

When it comes to recruitment in Inverses, HR Recruitment Services have access to some of the best positions and the best talent. We can help job seekers find the perfect position and can help employers to find the ideal candidate.

Source: http://bit.ly/1M2goIG

What HR Look For When Assessing A Candidate’s Job Fit

I’m learning the art of hiring. And every time I run a search for a client, I learn the craft a little more. Now that we have interviewed over 10,000 interviews,  I’m beginning to ask three basic questions about job fit as I assess a candidate for a particular job.

When I sit down with a candidate, I can tell pretty quickly if they’ve thought long and hard about the role and if it’s a good fit for them. It’s not that I’m smarter than anyone else; I just have a lot of reps under my belt when it comes to reading people quickly.

When I’m interviewing a candidate, these are some of the main categories I’m listening for in order to see if they are just applying to any job that comes their way or if they are intentionally thinking about job fit.

  1. Has their previous experience prepared them for this role?

I participated in the #AskForbes twitter chat a couple weeks ago. One of the questions that got a ton of engagement was about hiring for education versus hiring for experience. While I do think education is important and and can be immensely helpful, I would choose experience every time.

I believe size and scope of previous experience is one of the key determining characteristics for success in a future role. As the saying goes, “Past performance is the best indicator of future behavior.” While a few business writers might disagree, I’ve seen this truth played out time and time again.

It’s also important to note that the saying is “past performance,” not past success. In fact, I love asking people to tell me about a time they failed and what they learned from it. Hearing their story helps me understand what behavior they displayed when they failed. Did they take responsibility, fix the failure, and grow from the experience, or did they blame-shift and play the victim?

I’m not looking for someone who has a 100% success rate doing the exact same role. I’m looking for someone who has a track record of positivity, problem-solving, and growth when facing new challenges.

  1. Have they developed themselves and the people around them?

Not everyone on your staff needs to desire to lead a team. Every team needs both great leaders and great followers. However, I would argue that now more than ever, soft skills are vital to becoming an irreplaceable team member.

When I’m interviewing a candidate, I’m looking for someone who genuinely enjoys helping people find solutions, because whether you work for a church or for a tech startup, ultimately, we’re all helping people find solutions. I believe this so strongly, that “solution-side living” is one of the core values at my company.

I see way too many people make the mistake of judging a candidate solely based on output. While results are important (see my point above), I believe that it’s invaluable to hire team members who value people and investing in them.

  1. Does the organizational culture match the candidate’s wiring?

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it a million times: Culture trumps competency every time. When I’m interviewing a candidate, I’m looking for someone who has researched the organization, evaluated its culture, and has the self awareness to know whether it matches their own wiring.

Questions like, “This is a well-established organization of fifty years. I like to move pretty fast. Do you think that will be a problem?” or, “I’m big on systems and processes. I noticed this is a young company. Do they have sustainable systems and processes in place to support long-term growth?” show me the candidate is being discerning about the organizational culture and whether or not it would be a fit for them.

Both the employer and potential employees need to spend a lot of time and energy assessing culture fit in order to ensure it’s a good fit for both parties. If a culture fit isn’t there between the company and the candidate, both parties should have the wisdom to walk away.

The more a candidate can honestly evaluate their own experience and articulate it to me, the more realistic the expectations of both parties are throughout the interviewing and hiring process. If you look for candidates who are intentionally considering culture, chemistry, and competency fit throughout their job search, you’re much more likely to hire people with the discernment and soft skills to help take both them and your organization to the next level.

 

 

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