How To Answer Behavioral Interview Questions

Behavioral job interview questions are based on the premise that past behavior is the best predictor of future behavior – and that’s why they are so often asked by employers when assessing candidates during a job interview.

These types of competency-based interview questions typically begin with the phrase, “Tell me about a time when…” – and if you’re able to understand the specific requirements of the role before your interview, you’ll be much better prepared to predict these kinds of questions and think about how you’ll answer them.

THE CAR PRINCIPLE

The golden rule when you’re answering behavioral interview questions is to adhere to what’s called the CAR principle: Context, Action, Result.

Context is about describing a situation and setting the scene for a relevant example. The key here is to choose your example well – one that clearly demonstrates the quality or skill the employer is asking about.

Action is about explaining what action you took. Be really specific rather than making vague statements and outline your steps and rationale.

Result is about detailing the outcome of your action. Offer specific facts relating to the result. For instance, quote figures and statistics that back up your declaration.

Remember these three steps to answering behavioral interview questions and you’ll be well on your way to thoroughly impressing your interviewer.

CAR IN ACTION

Q: Tell me about a time when you helped to turn around your team’s sales performance.

Context: “One of my previous employer’s sales divisions had been experiencing decreasing sales – so I was brought in to help reverse the situation. My challenge was to manage the team effectively so they were able to actually exceed (not just meet) their sales targets.”

Action: “Over a six-month period, I introduced several initiatives within the team, including: setting specific and measurable sales targets for each individual within the team; introducing weekly sales meetings for the team and for each individual within the team; and implementing a structured sales training program.

I also conducted market research to identify what our main competitors were doing, set up focus groups with major clients to establish key goals, and introduced a new remuneration system that linked sales performance to remuneration packages.”

Result: “We lifted sales by 60% and exceeded sales targets by 25% in the first quarter, and continued the upward trajectory throughout the next year.”

SAMPLE BEHAVIOURAL JOB INTERVIEW QUESTIONS

Your ability to answer behavioural interview questions can make or break your attempt to secure that dream job – so we’ve put together some sample behavioural interview questions to help you more adequately prepare.

Communication

“Give an example of a time when you were able to build rapport with someone at work, even in a stressful or challenging situation.”

“Tell me about a time when you had to give someone constructive criticism.”

“Give me an example of how you were able to use your ability to communicate and persuade to gain buy-in from a resistant audience.”

Teamwork

“Give me an example of a time when you had to cope with interpersonal conflict when working on a team project.”

“Tell me about a time when your fellow team members were de-motivated. What did you do to improve morale?”

“Describe a situation where others you were working with on a project disagreed with your ideas. What did you do?”

Problem-solving

“Tell me about a difficult problem you were faced with, and how you went about tackling it.”

“Describe a time when you proactively identified a problem at work and were able to devise and implement a successful solution.”

“Have you ever faced a problem you could not solve?”

Creativity

“Tell me about a situation in which you worked with team members to develop new and creative ideas to solve a business problem.”

“Describe the most creative work-related project you have completed.”

“Give an example of when your creativity made a real difference in the success of a product or project.”

Organisation and planning

“Have you ever managed multiple projects simultaneously? What methods did you use to prioritise and multi-task?”

“What specific systems do you use to organise your day?”

“Describe a time when you failed to meet a deadline.”

Analytical skills

“Describe a situation where you had to interpret and synthesise a large amount of information or data.”

“Give me an example of a recent roadblock and your logic and steps in overcoming it.”

“What was your greatest success in using logic to solve a problem at work?”

Integrity

“Give an example that demonstrates your professional integrity.”

“Tell me about a time when you had to stand your ground against a group decision.”

“Have you ever had to work with, or for, someone who was dishonest? How have you handled this?”

Accomplishments

“Describe some projects that were implemented and carried out successfully primarily because of your efforts.”

“What are three achievements from your last job that you are particularly proud of?”

“What has been your most rewarding professional accomplishment to date?”

By preparing yourself in advance and familiarizing yourself with these and other sample behavioral interview questions, you’ll be primed and ready for any number of behavioral questions that may come your way.

Source: http://bit.ly/22LeN0C

7 Tips to Hire Best Candidates in 2018

 7 tips to hire best candidates in 2018

 

If you are a smart recruiter, then finding the right candidate for your organization is not hard to find. Hiring right talent – even in a competitive job market – becomes easy with well-thought out strategies. Top recruiters spend time formulating sound recruitment tactics which are both efficient and effective in procuring the best and the brightest employees. Here are some tips for hiring best candidates in 2018.

 

Use of Technology:

Technology plays a key role in improving the overall efficiency and effectiveness of the hiring process. Recruiters often use technology to select appropriate candidates, reach out to them easily and most importantly, fish the best out of the lot.

 

​Cross industry hiring:

Organisations are now looking for talent who can apply specialist knowledge in a generic industry. People who can use their experience to make a better tomorrow will be in demand and hence, cross industry hiring will receive a lot of fillip.

 

Power of review:

Employer review platforms – such as Glassdoor- offer an unbiased and clear picture to job seekers about their dream companies. The new generation of job-seekers extensively research prospective employers before they make a career move. Hence recruiters should pay attention to their employer brand and concerns surrounding it.

 

Use of analytics:

Today, recruiters are flooded with data pertaining to a variety of topics. This includes talent catchment, candidate preferences, performance of candidates on board, reasons why candidates refuse offers, and so on. Analytic support is becoming extremely crucial to decide which candidates to go after and how to keep them engaged.

 

Going social:

While job portals are the most preferred hiring medium for nearly 55% organisations, social media hiring is also gaining importance, revealed a recent study done. With significant penetration of Social Media – both in business and employees’ personal and professional lives – social networking is becoming a key source to tap diverse talent pool.

 

The mobile revolution:

More companies will develop apps that help schedule and record time and attendance, aid employee engagement, create digital to-do lists, productivity trackers and complete a range of other tasks. These apps will have the ability to access data stored in the cloud and be accessible from multiple devices. A smart recruiter must make use of these apps to save on time and resources.

 

Catch them young:

On the campus hiring front there has been a steady increase in the number of Pre-Placement Offers (PPOs). Year 2018 may see offers being rolled out to students who intern or do projects even in their second year of college. Hence keep a watch on the campus relevant to you.

 

 

 

 

QUALITIES THAT HR IS LOOKING IN NEW HIRES

QUALITIES THAT HR IS LOOKING IN NEW HIRES

Here are the some key qualities That HR look out in the new hires to ensure longevity of the tenure.

  1.  Endurance:

Turnovers can be expensive for HR. Hence the foremost qualities they look for in new hires are endurance, commitment and prospect of longevity of the tenure.

  1.  Team player:

Anybody can work in silos but it takes a lot of perseverance and high levels of patience and gratitude to work as a team player. Incidentally, all these qualities make for a good employee itself.

  1.   Ambitious:

Motivated and self-driven people are an asset to any organization. Ambitious employees work hard and try to surpass their own excellence, which in turn benefits the organization at large. Who doesn’t want to hire such employees?

  1.   Trustworthy:

Trust is a very tricky characteristic to identify in an employee. An employee who is true in his/her work and dependable is sure to have long-term benefits for the organizations and is most likely to stick around for long.

  1.    Positive attitude:

They say, if you have a positive attitude in life you are a sure winner. Organizations look out for such employees because they know such employees can stand up to failure and competition with much confidence.

  1.  Multi-tasking skills:

Businesses often resort to cost cutting by having fewer employees who can multi-task. With growing competition, multi-tasking is one of the desired quality HR looks for in new hires.

5 WAYS TALENT ACQUISITION IS DIFFERENT FROM RECRUITMENT

The terms “recruitment” and “talent acquisition” are often used interchangeably and thought to mean the same thing — a lexicon used to describe the multitude of processes involved in the finding and hiring of candidates. Yet, recruitment and talent acquisition are not the same thing. Understanding the differences between them and adapting your hiring process accordingly can help you hire top talent better.

Let’s begin by defining the two terms.

RECRUITMENT

A linear process that involves searching for a specific candidate to fill a specific position. Recruitment is reactive: a position is vacated or created and a new person must be found to fill it. The core function of recruiting is to find candidates for existing jobs that are currently available.

TALENT ACQUISITION

Instead of a linear process, talent acquisition is a cyclical approach that’s geared towards building relationships, anticipating future hiring needs, and creating a sustainable pool of candidates. It’s a more strategic approach that develops and nurtures a talent pipeline with a long-term view.

Now that we have defined the terms, here are the elements that differentiate talent acquisition from recruitment.

  1. Planning and Strategy
    Establishing a solid talent acquisition strategy needs a lot of planning. Unlike recruitment, talent acquisition requires a deeper look at the nature of your business and an understanding of future workplace needs.It’s a forward-thinking approach, looking through a wider lens, that takes into consideration the local and global labor markets. Since talent acquisition doesn’t happen in a vacuum, the process involves more planning and strategist.
  2. Workforce Segmentation
    Talent acquisition depends on understanding the different work segments within a company, as well as the different positions within those segments.Not only do you need a thorough understanding of your company’s inner workings, you must also know the skills, experiences, and competencies that each position requires for success.
  3. Employer Branding
    More than ever before, brands are going beyond attracting consumers to attracting talent. Ensuring that your company’s brand is clear and attractive is a main element in talent acquisition.This involves fostering a positive image and company culture, and establishing a good reputation based on quality products and services. A solid brand attracts top candidates while giving them a look inside at what it’s like to work for your company.
  4. Talent Scoping and Management
    Top talent comes from many different places. Through talent acquisition, you’re researching and recognizing the different places where you can source candidates.Once you’ve established contact with potential candidates, you have to maintain and build those relationships. All of this is done with the understanding that most of these candidates will not fill positions right away but rather down the line.
  5. Metrics and Analytics
    Finally, no talent acquisition strategy is complete without using key metrics to conduct proper tracking and analysis.By collecting and analyzing pertinent information, you can continuously improve your recruiting process and make better hiring decisions, ultimately improving your quality of hire.

One thing to note is that recruitment is a part of talent acquisition. However, to only engage in recruitment is a bit like putting the cart before the horse. All of the elements listed above are necessary in order to implement a strategy that will allow companies to attract, recruit, and maintain top talent.

Source: http://bit.ly/2yiAIHn

Ten Things A Recruiter Look For In A Job Candidate

I’ve been into HR industry for more than 15 years. Since then I’ve hired thousands of people.

Here’s what I look for in a job candidate.

1.  Look for someone who is awake and aware of their surroundings. This sounds like a trivial item, but it is fundamental. Many people view a job search as a clerical task, like filing their tax return. They put no thought into it. The show up at a job interview unprepared, never having spent a minute thinking about the role or how they would approach it.

2. Look for a candidate who owns their story. Many people don’t. When they talk about their career, they say “I got hired at Company A, and that was okay for a while but then they laid me off. My sister knew about a job in Kansas so I went out there, but then that company shut down.” Their whole career history is about things that happened to them. There is no agency or ownership of any of the moves they’ve made. I want to hire someone who makes their own decisions!

3. Look for someone who has their own opinions. I hope the candidate doesn’t stare at my face as they speak, hoping that their words meet with my approval. Who cares what I think? I am just another person on the planet, one of seven billion.

4. Want to hire someone who can see the intersection between the work they’ve already done and the work I am hiring someone to do. It doesn’t have to be linear, left-brain relevance. They could have worked in a different function or industry. Those things don’t matter nearly as much as a person’s ability to put themselves in the hiring manager’s shoes and say “I hear what you are saying. It sounds like your problem is X  — here’s how I’ve solved that problem in the past.”

5. Look for someone with a sense of humor. We spend too much time at work to be serious all the time. If work is stiff and formal, it’s no fun. Time-and-motion-type “efficiency” is overrated. Real efficiency comes from tapping the human power we all bring to work — if our leaders allow us to use it!

6. Hire folks who are confident in their own abilities. I don’t want to hire someone who is afraid to speak with their own voice. How could a fearful person help me solve my biggest problems? I don’t want to hire the most docile or submissive candidate. Some managers do, of course — but how long could you stand working for someone like that?

7. Look for a candidate who values their life outside of work.

8. Want to hire someone who knows what they want from their next job and their career. I am excited when a candidate says “I want to work in the corporate world for a few years, and then start my own business.” We all need an entrepreneurial outlook and mindset these days, whether we work for ourselves or someone else. People with an entrepreneurial mindset look out at the horizon to spot problems before they can cause trouble. I don’t want to hire someone who only focuses on the work on their desk.

9. Hire people who expect more out of their work than just a paycheck. I want to work around people with ideas, sparky people who try new things just to see what will happen. I want to get their texts at six in the morning that say “I just had the craziest thought, stepping out of the shower! What if we tried…”

10. Finally, I look for a candidate who takes responsibility for their decisions. Sadly, many candidates don’t. They show up as victims, rather than the most important and powerful person in their own life.

We all run into roadblocks and hardships. It’s part of life. How we deal with them is everything. I want to hire someone who has faced adversity and who overcame it. They have muscles!

You deserve a manager who wants to hire someone as smart, capable and awesome as you are.

If you have to dumb down your resume or play a part on a job interview to get hired, you know one thing — that manager doesn’t deserve your talents!

You may have to kiss a lot of frogs to find a manager who gets you and thus deserves you.

If you aren’t willing to kiss frogs and slam doors on the wrong opportunities in order to bring the right ones in, we can all sympathize with you — but you will not grow the muscles you need until you face that challenge and surmount it.

Why Some People Get All The Good Job Offers

When working with job seekers, I often hear something like this, “I want to be more like my friend, ___. He’s always getting contacted about good job opportunities. His career has been one great position after another.” Then, they sigh and talk about how easy the person makes it look. Finally, they start to discount the person’s success with statements like, “He got a lucky break when he worked at ___.” Or, “He’s kind of intense when it comes to networking.” They say anything they can to make themselves feel better.

You can imagine their surprise when I say,

“Your friend isn’t lucky. He’s figured out the two most important activities needed to be in control of your career.”

We’ve all heard the saying, “Luck is where preparation meets opportunity.” It’s true, but most people don’t know how to translate that to actionable advice for their career. Until now…

If American Idol host, Ryan Seacrest can do it, so can you!

A great example of someone who has figured the two steps to a killer career strategy, is Ryan Seacrest. He has six jobs right now. He’s mastered the process I’m about to share with you. It’s not rocket science or brain surgery. All it takes is this:

Step 1: Know what your workplace personas are. Companies hire people who can solve problems and alleviate pains. After all, it’s costing them an average of 130-140% of your annual salary to employ you. Your workplace personas are how you like to create value for an employer. It’s the way in which you excel at saving and/or making them money – enough money to justify the cost of employing you. There are eight key personas in the workplace. All of us dominate in 2-3 of them. When we know our workplace personas, we can choose opportunities that leverage them. This is how people build successful track records. They use the skills they most enjoy to do the job. A total win-win.

Step 2: Consistently educate people about your workplace personas. Once you know your workplace personas and start to build a successful track record with them, the next step is to learn how to share your success with others in a way that doesn’t sound like bragging. Smart professionals know this is done via strategic networking. When you have meaningful conversations with people about problems you love to solve for your employer and discuss how you do it, you’re organically marketing your skills and abilities. The more you do this (i.e. answer questions for people, offer free advice and assistance, share how your company overcame similar challenges with your help, etc.), the stronger your professional reputation becomes. At which point, when people hear about jobs that are open and problems employers need solved, their interactions with you come to mind – and the phone calls and emails start coming in with those coveted job opportunities.

Want the best jobs? Act like a business-of-one.

The most successful small businesses build their reputations and market their services. They’re known for delivering results, which leads to an increase in referrals. You’re a business-of-one, which is the smallest type of small business. That means, you have to be even more vigilant about building your reputation and marketing your services – or suffer the consequences. Gone are the days where you could just keep your head down, do a good job, and stay with a company for 30 years. Today, you need to always be growing your skills AND letting people know about your growth. Otherwise, you will find yourself at the mercy of the job market.

Stop envying your peers and start doing what it takes to be the in-demand professional you long to be known as. Especially, now that you know how to prepare so opportunity can find you!

Source: http://bit.ly/2kv1N3N

Three Traits Recruiters Find Most Desirable In Face-to-Face Job Interviews

Recruiters and hiring managers have always considered conversational skills an important trait in new hires, but a new survey now places communication at the very top of the list.

The recruiting software company, Jobvite, together with Zogby Analytics, has just released its 2017 Recruiter Nation Report. The online survey of 831 recruiters in the U.S. is intended to identify the traits and qualities that recruiters evaluate to make the perfect hire—and the qualities they consider deal breakers, too.

Recruiters were asked the following question: “Which of the following positively impact your decision to hire a candidate during an initial in-person interview?” The question was a followed by a list of ‘subjective traits’ such as: appearance, punctuality, portfolio, conversation skills, industry knowledge and enthusiasm. According to recruiters, the most desirable traits are (in order):

1). Conversational skills (69% of recruiters said this is most important quality they look for in a job candidate)

2). Knowledge of industry

3). Enthusiasm

According to recruiters, a candidate’s ability to articulate their ideas effectively in conversation is a measure of their capacity to engage with others, a window into how the job candidate might interact with team members, clients and customers should they be hired.

Interestingly, the survey showed a generation gap among recruiters and the premium they place on conversational skills. For example, millennial recruiters place more of an emphasis on conversational skills than those recruiters over 50. A full 75% of millennials value communication skills as their top priority compared to 60% of those recruiters over 50, who place a greater emphasis on industry knowledge.

According to the survey, recruiters have seen it all— the good, the bad and the downright strange. For example, most recruiters say they’ve interviewed job candidates who didn’t know what company they were interviewing for. And a full 75% of recruiters say they’ve had candidates who dress “too casual,” which is a good reminder to dress a little better than you would for a normal day at the office.

Some qualities are subjective, of course, but the following actions are universal deal breakers, according to the survey. In other words, a majority of recruiters agreed that these actions would automatically disqualify a candidate:

  • Being rude to the receptionist or support staff
  • Checking phones during the interview
  • Showing up late
  • Bad hygiene

Communication skills will set you apart in a job interview. As I wrote in a previous article, many recruiters will openly admit that if they had to choose between two candidates with equal credentials, they are more likely to give the job to the person who can communicate better with colleagues and customers. Credentials and experience are no longer enough. Yes, they might get you through the door, but how you present yourself when you’re in the room still counts the most.

Source: http://bit.ly/2xoQIUD

How Positive Employee Morale Benefits Your Business !!

Employee satisfaction and retention are common key performance indicators for business success, but beyond a surface level, how well do you know your employees? Isn’t there a work-life balance for a reason? Past generations of employers have gone by the mantra of “Leave your personal life at home where it belongs” to employee and employer detriment.

The new generations of employers understand that the dash between work and life in the term “work-life balance” is critical to the success of the company beyond a surface level. These employers realize how an employee’s personal life directly impacts their professional life through morale, environment and productivity. Promoting positive employee morale and getting to know more about your employees on a personal level directly benefits your business.

Putting the “Human” in Human Resources

Not every CEO has time to memorize every employee’s hobbies, the names of their children or their zodiac sign. But employers do need to take the time to acknowledge the “human” in “human resources,” by developing more inclusive policies and recognizing individual, yet essential, employee needs.

It’s especially important for employees who are putting in 12+ hour days, because their dedication may literally be killing them by increasing stress and risk for depression, diabetes, heart disease, sleep deprivation and more.

In fact, employees who think they have a positive work-life balance are more productive and dedicated by 21 percent than those who don’t think so, according to a survey of 50,000 employees worldwide. To gain these benefits, the employer only has to offer beneficial work-life services and policies that employees can choose to participate in.

You don’t necessarily have to know every employee’s favorite pizza topping, but it’s vital to recognize their needs from a human perspective and address those issues. In the long run, prioritizing your employees’ morale will be beneficial to the company as a whole as well as to the individual employees.

The Case for Prioritizing Employee Morale

Most employers would agree that keeping employees happy and healthy is intrinsic to a company’s success, but is focusing more resources on boosting employee morale less cost effective than an old-fashioned pat on the back?

Paid sick-leave days cost employers $160 billion annually, but decreasing stress and health risks saves employers money. Meanwhile, extending paid sick leave to contract workers decreases their stress levels because they know they have access to financial security.

In either situation, employees are less likely to show up to work and spread illness due to an unfortunate catch-22: personal health or a roof over your family’s head?

Keeping work hours reasonable can increase productivity. For example, employees in Greece work an average of 42 hours per week or 2,042 hours a year. In 2014, German workers, who averaged a 28-hour work week, or 1,371 hours a year, were more productive by 70 percent.

Burned out employees are more likely to quit. Add in recruitment costs and your business costs skyrocket over what it’d cost to retain that employee and improve their work situation. One study revealed that one out of four workers who felt they had no support structure for adequate work-life balance made plans to quit in the following two years, in comparison to 17 percent who felt they had support.

Interestingly, a separate study found that those who implemented flexible work plans reported an 89 percent retention increase from HR. These arrangements benefit employee satisfaction, health and retention, but it’s important that employers take active steps in making these types of arrangements known to their employees.

The median cost of employee turnover is 21 percent of their annual salary for all positions except physicians and executives, so it’s more economical to retain employees and invest in employee morale. By prioritizing employee morale, employers acknowledge the importance of staff contributions on a personal and professional level.

Cultivate a work environment that promotes true work-life balance by providing access to supportive services and making employees aware of these initiatives. Employees simply having the knowledge of support systems is enough to boost morale, but employers can go the extra mile by being willing to provide realistic and flexible work plans and actively promoting a positive, healthy work environment.

Source: http://bit.ly/2vrgYQm

Your Company Has A Purpose, But Do You?

If you’re in HR, marketing or any leadership role, you hear it all the time: Your company needs to articulate its purpose. Simon Sinek gave his popular TED talk on the subject in 2009. To date, the video has 33 million views.

LinkedIn and Imperative released a global study on the topic just last year. And a quick Google search will yield a ton of articles covering a different piece of the purpose pie every day. Yet there’s a sliver that deserves more attention.

How does your personal purpose align with the purpose of the organization where you work?

Working at an entrepreneurial agency, I have been able to explore many areas of business over the course of my career and became involved in different passion projects along the way. I have always gravitated towards internal operations and people work — even though I started out in client service and public relations — but I never had a guiding purpose or beacon that led me (at least not that I was aware).

It was working fine for me until five years ago, when very unexpectedly, I lost my younger brother to suicide. I can’t begin to express the tragic and gut-wrenching time this was, nor the difficult months and years that followed.

After this, I questioned everything: How did this happen? What if it happens again? How can we talk about these issues more openly as a society? In my family? At work? How can I better help the people in my life?

The seemingly endless barrage of questions follow me to this day, and probably will for eternity.

It’s that last one that really sticks though: “How can I better help the people in my life?” I ask it every morning, night and moment that my brain quiets.

I am driven to better serve the people around me so they can be more aware of the opportunities they have and can create for themselves, as well as to be a solid supporter for them when they’re troubled.

That’s my personal purpose.

My company strives to be a great place to work where we do great work. It’s a place where employees can be themselves, take on challenging assignments, and have fun while they succeed together.

Happily, there was alignment between my purpose and what the company needed. I was able to transition my career into human resources, where I am helping to shape the experience people have when they work here.

It took a tragic awakening for me to set my life on a more purposeful path, but it doesn’t need to be that way for everyone. What it does take are attention and intention.

If you don’t yet have a defined purpose, think about the following:

  • What are the questions you ask yourself over and over?
  • What are the best projects you’ve worked on? Why?
  • Why were they important to you?
  • What gets you excited to come to work?
  • What brought you joy at – and outside of – work today? Why?

For two weeks, keep a journal to answer these questions. Review to see what resonates and what themes emerge. You can start to identify what you enjoy, want more of and desire to solve. With that in mind, you can look at your company’s purpose to determine if there is or could be alignment.

As you assess the connection between your personal purpose and the company purpose, consider the following:

  1. Look at shifts to your current role. Identify pain points in your company that are connected to your role and are aligned with organizational/personal purpose. Put your hand up and make your case to help or lead an initiative in that area.
  2. Explore new roles in your organization. Like me, you may have a calling that fits your personal purpose and helps the company, but you’re not in that role just yet. Speak with HR or a trusted manager to apply for another opening. If there are no relevant positions, get creative and see if there are steps you can take towards a new role. Maybe it’s shadowing someone in that role now, sitting on a new project committee or developing your own solution to an existing challenge. Sometimes expressing your interest is enough to open new doors.
  3. Acknowledge the round peg/square hole. If you’ve reflected, looked for alignment and sought connection, and it’s just not there, that’s OK. Be real with yourself, and if you can, with your company. At our firm, we have the utmost respect for people who say our company is not for them and are open to helping them find a better fit. If you’re not able to have this open conversation in your company, all the more reason to move on. This is the nature of business, and there is something better and more fulfilling for you out there.When you take a purposeful look at purpose – your own and your company’s – you may be surprised at the meaning you will add to your day, career and future. Worth a shot, no?

How Google’s AI-Powered Job Search Will Impact Companies And Job Seekers!!

In mid-June, Google announced the implementation of an AI-powered search function aimed at connecting job seekers with jobs by sorting through posted recruitment information. The system allows users to search for basic phrases, such as “jobs near me,” or perform searches for industry-specific keywords. The search results can include reviews from Glass door or other companies, along with the details of what skills the hiring company is looking to acquire.

As this is a relatively new development, what the system will mean is still an open question. To help, members from the Forbes Coaches Council offer their analysis on how the search system will impact candidates or companies. 

1. Provides A One-Stop Shop 

In this information age, it can be challenging for job seekers to wade through online content to locate right-fit opportunities. Google’s new feature will streamline the tedious job search task by intuitively aligning wants with needs, and narrowing search results. It’s a “one-stop shop” for job seekers, drawing relevant job postings into one location and helping employers gain greater visibility.

2. Could Be A Game Changer For Transparent Communications 

If “let me Google my next job” becomes the cornerstone of job search, I predict it will become a game changer in transparent communications between candidates and employers, from candidate application to confirmation of next steps. The pain for candidates is the lack of feedback. If Google can change this, I expect the tech to impact employer brand — hopefully for the better.

3. Reputation Management Will Be Key For Companies 

Google’s new AI-powered job search engine couples job postings with employee ratings from sites like Glass door, so candidates can read reviews about a particular employer before applying for the job. Companies with negative reviews will have a harder time recruiting the right talent, while companies with positive reviews can draw from a larger candidate pool. 

4. Will Create Access, But Not Improve Etiquette 

Good for Google for showing the way to job seekers, but with great access comes great responsibility to better communicate. Without this perspective, job seekers may roll through people, information and create poor communication that could injure their credibility. LinkedIn creates access points and etiquette through InMail. I give them credit. But job seekers still need people skills to win.

5. Expect Competition To Increase

Google jumping into the job search market may make it easier than ever to apply for a role online. For companies, this could likely tax the already strained-ATS system, and unless fixed, could mean many more resumes falling into that “black hole.” For candidates, competition might be steeper than ever, which means networking will be even more important to job search success. 

6. Provides A Move Towards Closing The Wage Gap 

Google is empowering both employers and candidates to move towards equal pay for equal work. It will eliminate silos of information, where pay data has been hidden as it relates to work competencies and experience needed to qualify for positions. Increased access to information and data promotes transparency, and will inevitably cause a shift in compensation.

7. Companies May Have To Get More Creative With Their Strategies 

Google Jobs will impact the career industry in a similar way that its impacted the travel industry. Google will feature their own search tool first, and may feature jobs at Google first. This will force candidates and companies to be more creative with their strategies. Companies may want to post jobs on Google and on other top job sites. Candidates will want to apply in more than one spot. 

8. Makes A Challenging Part Of Life Easier 

Finding the right job fit is equally challenging for candidates and companies. The new Google job search feature will make it easier to bring both together by reducing duplicate postings, and helping both candidates and companies find a match that may have otherwise been missed. I believe one of the greatest benefits is the ability to pick up on social and work experiences via Facebook, LinkedIn and Gmail.

9. Aids Human Resource Management 

Hiring the right people is a hard task, especially if HR managers are bombarded with thousands of CVs. Sometimes, implicit biases can creep into the job interviewing process, and qualified candidates might be overlooked. AI can give a boost to hiring strategy by helping HR specialists identify the best candidates for a position and thereby decreasing human subjectivity and error in decision-making.

10. Understanding Keywords And Trending Topics Will Be Essential 

Since Google’s AI is based on crowd-gathered metrics, the importance of keywords and understanding trending topics is essential for both employers and candidates. Standing out from the crowd or getting relevant results will be determined by how well you speak the expected language of the AI. Optimizing for the search engine’s results pages will make or break your search for a job or candidate. 

11. Companies Will Test The Waters Before Committing To The Process 

Both employers and employees will test this first. If the Google system gives off high-quality search results, then recruiters or job searchers will save a ton of time and money to find their best match. If not, and search results are not qualified or any other complication shows up — for example, you can’t reach either party — people will just go back to their old ways. So we must wait and see!

12. Candidates Will Be Less Likely To Miss Opportunities, Even If They’re Not Actively Looking 

The new Google AI feature streamlines the job search process and delivers greater simplicity to active job seekers, while simultaneously creating a new temptation for non-job seekers who will receive notice of jobs openings they weren’t looking for. Candidates are less likely to miss available job opportunities and will be able to use the data-rich Google profiles to apply for a tailor-fit role.

Source: http://bit.ly/2idHXsy