5 WAYS TALENT ACQUISITION IS DIFFERENT FROM RECRUITMENT

The terms “recruitment” and “talent acquisition” are often used interchangeably and thought to mean the same thing — a lexicon used to describe the multitude of processes involved in the finding and hiring of candidates. Yet, recruitment and talent acquisition are not the same thing. Understanding the differences between them and adapting your hiring process accordingly can help you hire top talent better.

Let’s begin by defining the two terms.

RECRUITMENT

A linear process that involves searching for a specific candidate to fill a specific position. Recruitment is reactive: a position is vacated or created and a new person must be found to fill it. The core function of recruiting is to find candidates for existing jobs that are currently available.

TALENT ACQUISITION

Instead of a linear process, talent acquisition is a cyclical approach that’s geared towards building relationships, anticipating future hiring needs, and creating a sustainable pool of candidates. It’s a more strategic approach that develops and nurtures a talent pipeline with a long-term view.

Now that we have defined the terms, here are the elements that differentiate talent acquisition from recruitment.

  1. Planning and Strategy
    Establishing a solid talent acquisition strategy needs a lot of planning. Unlike recruitment, talent acquisition requires a deeper look at the nature of your business and an understanding of future workplace needs.It’s a forward-thinking approach, looking through a wider lens, that takes into consideration the local and global labor markets. Since talent acquisition doesn’t happen in a vacuum, the process involves more planning and strategist.
  2. Workforce Segmentation
    Talent acquisition depends on understanding the different work segments within a company, as well as the different positions within those segments.Not only do you need a thorough understanding of your company’s inner workings, you must also know the skills, experiences, and competencies that each position requires for success.
  3. Employer Branding
    More than ever before, brands are going beyond attracting consumers to attracting talent. Ensuring that your company’s brand is clear and attractive is a main element in talent acquisition.This involves fostering a positive image and company culture, and establishing a good reputation based on quality products and services. A solid brand attracts top candidates while giving them a look inside at what it’s like to work for your company.
  4. Talent Scoping and Management
    Top talent comes from many different places. Through talent acquisition, you’re researching and recognizing the different places where you can source candidates.Once you’ve established contact with potential candidates, you have to maintain and build those relationships. All of this is done with the understanding that most of these candidates will not fill positions right away but rather down the line.
  5. Metrics and Analytics
    Finally, no talent acquisition strategy is complete without using key metrics to conduct proper tracking and analysis.By collecting and analyzing pertinent information, you can continuously improve your recruiting process and make better hiring decisions, ultimately improving your quality of hire.

One thing to note is that recruitment is a part of talent acquisition. However, to only engage in recruitment is a bit like putting the cart before the horse. All of the elements listed above are necessary in order to implement a strategy that will allow companies to attract, recruit, and maintain top talent.

Source: http://bit.ly/2yiAIHn

Ten Things A Recruiter Look For In A Job Candidate

I’ve been into HR industry for more than 15 years. Since then I’ve hired thousands of people.

Here’s what I look for in a job candidate.

1.  Look for someone who is awake and aware of their surroundings. This sounds like a trivial item, but it is fundamental. Many people view a job search as a clerical task, like filing their tax return. They put no thought into it. The show up at a job interview unprepared, never having spent a minute thinking about the role or how they would approach it.

2. Look for a candidate who owns their story. Many people don’t. When they talk about their career, they say “I got hired at Company A, and that was okay for a while but then they laid me off. My sister knew about a job in Kansas so I went out there, but then that company shut down.” Their whole career history is about things that happened to them. There is no agency or ownership of any of the moves they’ve made. I want to hire someone who makes their own decisions!

3. Look for someone who has their own opinions. I hope the candidate doesn’t stare at my face as they speak, hoping that their words meet with my approval. Who cares what I think? I am just another person on the planet, one of seven billion.

4. Want to hire someone who can see the intersection between the work they’ve already done and the work I am hiring someone to do. It doesn’t have to be linear, left-brain relevance. They could have worked in a different function or industry. Those things don’t matter nearly as much as a person’s ability to put themselves in the hiring manager’s shoes and say “I hear what you are saying. It sounds like your problem is X  — here’s how I’ve solved that problem in the past.”

5. Look for someone with a sense of humor. We spend too much time at work to be serious all the time. If work is stiff and formal, it’s no fun. Time-and-motion-type “efficiency” is overrated. Real efficiency comes from tapping the human power we all bring to work — if our leaders allow us to use it!

6. Hire folks who are confident in their own abilities. I don’t want to hire someone who is afraid to speak with their own voice. How could a fearful person help me solve my biggest problems? I don’t want to hire the most docile or submissive candidate. Some managers do, of course — but how long could you stand working for someone like that?

7. Look for a candidate who values their life outside of work.

8. Want to hire someone who knows what they want from their next job and their career. I am excited when a candidate says “I want to work in the corporate world for a few years, and then start my own business.” We all need an entrepreneurial outlook and mindset these days, whether we work for ourselves or someone else. People with an entrepreneurial mindset look out at the horizon to spot problems before they can cause trouble. I don’t want to hire someone who only focuses on the work on their desk.

9. Hire people who expect more out of their work than just a paycheck. I want to work around people with ideas, sparky people who try new things just to see what will happen. I want to get their texts at six in the morning that say “I just had the craziest thought, stepping out of the shower! What if we tried…”

10. Finally, I look for a candidate who takes responsibility for their decisions. Sadly, many candidates don’t. They show up as victims, rather than the most important and powerful person in their own life.

We all run into roadblocks and hardships. It’s part of life. How we deal with them is everything. I want to hire someone who has faced adversity and who overcame it. They have muscles!

You deserve a manager who wants to hire someone as smart, capable and awesome as you are.

If you have to dumb down your resume or play a part on a job interview to get hired, you know one thing — that manager doesn’t deserve your talents!

You may have to kiss a lot of frogs to find a manager who gets you and thus deserves you.

If you aren’t willing to kiss frogs and slam doors on the wrong opportunities in order to bring the right ones in, we can all sympathize with you — but you will not grow the muscles you need until you face that challenge and surmount it.

Why Some People Get All The Good Job Offers

When working with job seekers, I often hear something like this, “I want to be more like my friend, ___. He’s always getting contacted about good job opportunities. His career has been one great position after another.” Then, they sigh and talk about how easy the person makes it look. Finally, they start to discount the person’s success with statements like, “He got a lucky break when he worked at ___.” Or, “He’s kind of intense when it comes to networking.” They say anything they can to make themselves feel better.

You can imagine their surprise when I say,

“Your friend isn’t lucky. He’s figured out the two most important activities needed to be in control of your career.”

We’ve all heard the saying, “Luck is where preparation meets opportunity.” It’s true, but most people don’t know how to translate that to actionable advice for their career. Until now…

If American Idol host, Ryan Seacrest can do it, so can you!

A great example of someone who has figured the two steps to a killer career strategy, is Ryan Seacrest. He has six jobs right now. He’s mastered the process I’m about to share with you. It’s not rocket science or brain surgery. All it takes is this:

Step 1: Know what your workplace personas are. Companies hire people who can solve problems and alleviate pains. After all, it’s costing them an average of 130-140% of your annual salary to employ you. Your workplace personas are how you like to create value for an employer. It’s the way in which you excel at saving and/or making them money – enough money to justify the cost of employing you. There are eight key personas in the workplace. All of us dominate in 2-3 of them. When we know our workplace personas, we can choose opportunities that leverage them. This is how people build successful track records. They use the skills they most enjoy to do the job. A total win-win.

Step 2: Consistently educate people about your workplace personas. Once you know your workplace personas and start to build a successful track record with them, the next step is to learn how to share your success with others in a way that doesn’t sound like bragging. Smart professionals know this is done via strategic networking. When you have meaningful conversations with people about problems you love to solve for your employer and discuss how you do it, you’re organically marketing your skills and abilities. The more you do this (i.e. answer questions for people, offer free advice and assistance, share how your company overcame similar challenges with your help, etc.), the stronger your professional reputation becomes. At which point, when people hear about jobs that are open and problems employers need solved, their interactions with you come to mind – and the phone calls and emails start coming in with those coveted job opportunities.

Want the best jobs? Act like a business-of-one.

The most successful small businesses build their reputations and market their services. They’re known for delivering results, which leads to an increase in referrals. You’re a business-of-one, which is the smallest type of small business. That means, you have to be even more vigilant about building your reputation and marketing your services – or suffer the consequences. Gone are the days where you could just keep your head down, do a good job, and stay with a company for 30 years. Today, you need to always be growing your skills AND letting people know about your growth. Otherwise, you will find yourself at the mercy of the job market.

Stop envying your peers and start doing what it takes to be the in-demand professional you long to be known as. Especially, now that you know how to prepare so opportunity can find you!

Source: http://bit.ly/2kv1N3N

Three Traits Recruiters Find Most Desirable In Face-to-Face Job Interviews

Recruiters and hiring managers have always considered conversational skills an important trait in new hires, but a new survey now places communication at the very top of the list.

The recruiting software company, Jobvite, together with Zogby Analytics, has just released its 2017 Recruiter Nation Report. The online survey of 831 recruiters in the U.S. is intended to identify the traits and qualities that recruiters evaluate to make the perfect hire—and the qualities they consider deal breakers, too.

Recruiters were asked the following question: “Which of the following positively impact your decision to hire a candidate during an initial in-person interview?” The question was a followed by a list of ‘subjective traits’ such as: appearance, punctuality, portfolio, conversation skills, industry knowledge and enthusiasm. According to recruiters, the most desirable traits are (in order):

1). Conversational skills (69% of recruiters said this is most important quality they look for in a job candidate)

2). Knowledge of industry

3). Enthusiasm

According to recruiters, a candidate’s ability to articulate their ideas effectively in conversation is a measure of their capacity to engage with others, a window into how the job candidate might interact with team members, clients and customers should they be hired.

Interestingly, the survey showed a generation gap among recruiters and the premium they place on conversational skills. For example, millennial recruiters place more of an emphasis on conversational skills than those recruiters over 50. A full 75% of millennials value communication skills as their top priority compared to 60% of those recruiters over 50, who place a greater emphasis on industry knowledge.

According to the survey, recruiters have seen it all— the good, the bad and the downright strange. For example, most recruiters say they’ve interviewed job candidates who didn’t know what company they were interviewing for. And a full 75% of recruiters say they’ve had candidates who dress “too casual,” which is a good reminder to dress a little better than you would for a normal day at the office.

Some qualities are subjective, of course, but the following actions are universal deal breakers, according to the survey. In other words, a majority of recruiters agreed that these actions would automatically disqualify a candidate:

  • Being rude to the receptionist or support staff
  • Checking phones during the interview
  • Showing up late
  • Bad hygiene

Communication skills will set you apart in a job interview. As I wrote in a previous article, many recruiters will openly admit that if they had to choose between two candidates with equal credentials, they are more likely to give the job to the person who can communicate better with colleagues and customers. Credentials and experience are no longer enough. Yes, they might get you through the door, but how you present yourself when you’re in the room still counts the most.

Source: http://bit.ly/2xoQIUD

How Positive Employee Morale Benefits Your Business !!

Employee satisfaction and retention are common key performance indicators for business success, but beyond a surface level, how well do you know your employees? Isn’t there a work-life balance for a reason? Past generations of employers have gone by the mantra of “Leave your personal life at home where it belongs” to employee and employer detriment.

The new generations of employers understand that the dash between work and life in the term “work-life balance” is critical to the success of the company beyond a surface level. These employers realize how an employee’s personal life directly impacts their professional life through morale, environment and productivity. Promoting positive employee morale and getting to know more about your employees on a personal level directly benefits your business.

Putting the “Human” in Human Resources

Not every CEO has time to memorize every employee’s hobbies, the names of their children or their zodiac sign. But employers do need to take the time to acknowledge the “human” in “human resources,” by developing more inclusive policies and recognizing individual, yet essential, employee needs.

It’s especially important for employees who are putting in 12+ hour days, because their dedication may literally be killing them by increasing stress and risk for depression, diabetes, heart disease, sleep deprivation and more.

In fact, employees who think they have a positive work-life balance are more productive and dedicated by 21 percent than those who don’t think so, according to a survey of 50,000 employees worldwide. To gain these benefits, the employer only has to offer beneficial work-life services and policies that employees can choose to participate in.

You don’t necessarily have to know every employee’s favorite pizza topping, but it’s vital to recognize their needs from a human perspective and address those issues. In the long run, prioritizing your employees’ morale will be beneficial to the company as a whole as well as to the individual employees.

The Case for Prioritizing Employee Morale

Most employers would agree that keeping employees happy and healthy is intrinsic to a company’s success, but is focusing more resources on boosting employee morale less cost effective than an old-fashioned pat on the back?

Paid sick-leave days cost employers $160 billion annually, but decreasing stress and health risks saves employers money. Meanwhile, extending paid sick leave to contract workers decreases their stress levels because they know they have access to financial security.

In either situation, employees are less likely to show up to work and spread illness due to an unfortunate catch-22: personal health or a roof over your family’s head?

Keeping work hours reasonable can increase productivity. For example, employees in Greece work an average of 42 hours per week or 2,042 hours a year. In 2014, German workers, who averaged a 28-hour work week, or 1,371 hours a year, were more productive by 70 percent.

Burned out employees are more likely to quit. Add in recruitment costs and your business costs skyrocket over what it’d cost to retain that employee and improve their work situation. One study revealed that one out of four workers who felt they had no support structure for adequate work-life balance made plans to quit in the following two years, in comparison to 17 percent who felt they had support.

Interestingly, a separate study found that those who implemented flexible work plans reported an 89 percent retention increase from HR. These arrangements benefit employee satisfaction, health and retention, but it’s important that employers take active steps in making these types of arrangements known to their employees.

The median cost of employee turnover is 21 percent of their annual salary for all positions except physicians and executives, so it’s more economical to retain employees and invest in employee morale. By prioritizing employee morale, employers acknowledge the importance of staff contributions on a personal and professional level.

Cultivate a work environment that promotes true work-life balance by providing access to supportive services and making employees aware of these initiatives. Employees simply having the knowledge of support systems is enough to boost morale, but employers can go the extra mile by being willing to provide realistic and flexible work plans and actively promoting a positive, healthy work environment.

Source: http://bit.ly/2vrgYQm

Your Company Has A Purpose, But Do You?

If you’re in HR, marketing or any leadership role, you hear it all the time: Your company needs to articulate its purpose. Simon Sinek gave his popular TED talk on the subject in 2009. To date, the video has 33 million views.

LinkedIn and Imperative released a global study on the topic just last year. And a quick Google search will yield a ton of articles covering a different piece of the purpose pie every day. Yet there’s a sliver that deserves more attention.

How does your personal purpose align with the purpose of the organization where you work?

Working at an entrepreneurial agency, I have been able to explore many areas of business over the course of my career and became involved in different passion projects along the way. I have always gravitated towards internal operations and people work — even though I started out in client service and public relations — but I never had a guiding purpose or beacon that led me (at least not that I was aware).

It was working fine for me until five years ago, when very unexpectedly, I lost my younger brother to suicide. I can’t begin to express the tragic and gut-wrenching time this was, nor the difficult months and years that followed.

After this, I questioned everything: How did this happen? What if it happens again? How can we talk about these issues more openly as a society? In my family? At work? How can I better help the people in my life?

The seemingly endless barrage of questions follow me to this day, and probably will for eternity.

It’s that last one that really sticks though: “How can I better help the people in my life?” I ask it every morning, night and moment that my brain quiets.

I am driven to better serve the people around me so they can be more aware of the opportunities they have and can create for themselves, as well as to be a solid supporter for them when they’re troubled.

That’s my personal purpose.

My company strives to be a great place to work where we do great work. It’s a place where employees can be themselves, take on challenging assignments, and have fun while they succeed together.

Happily, there was alignment between my purpose and what the company needed. I was able to transition my career into human resources, where I am helping to shape the experience people have when they work here.

It took a tragic awakening for me to set my life on a more purposeful path, but it doesn’t need to be that way for everyone. What it does take are attention and intention.

If you don’t yet have a defined purpose, think about the following:

  • What are the questions you ask yourself over and over?
  • What are the best projects you’ve worked on? Why?
  • Why were they important to you?
  • What gets you excited to come to work?
  • What brought you joy at – and outside of – work today? Why?

For two weeks, keep a journal to answer these questions. Review to see what resonates and what themes emerge. You can start to identify what you enjoy, want more of and desire to solve. With that in mind, you can look at your company’s purpose to determine if there is or could be alignment.

As you assess the connection between your personal purpose and the company purpose, consider the following:

  1. Look at shifts to your current role. Identify pain points in your company that are connected to your role and are aligned with organizational/personal purpose. Put your hand up and make your case to help or lead an initiative in that area.
  2. Explore new roles in your organization. Like me, you may have a calling that fits your personal purpose and helps the company, but you’re not in that role just yet. Speak with HR or a trusted manager to apply for another opening. If there are no relevant positions, get creative and see if there are steps you can take towards a new role. Maybe it’s shadowing someone in that role now, sitting on a new project committee or developing your own solution to an existing challenge. Sometimes expressing your interest is enough to open new doors.
  3. Acknowledge the round peg/square hole. If you’ve reflected, looked for alignment and sought connection, and it’s just not there, that’s OK. Be real with yourself, and if you can, with your company. At our firm, we have the utmost respect for people who say our company is not for them and are open to helping them find a better fit. If you’re not able to have this open conversation in your company, all the more reason to move on. This is the nature of business, and there is something better and more fulfilling for you out there.When you take a purposeful look at purpose – your own and your company’s – you may be surprised at the meaning you will add to your day, career and future. Worth a shot, no?

How Google’s AI-Powered Job Search Will Impact Companies And Job Seekers!!

In mid-June, Google announced the implementation of an AI-powered search function aimed at connecting job seekers with jobs by sorting through posted recruitment information. The system allows users to search for basic phrases, such as “jobs near me,” or perform searches for industry-specific keywords. The search results can include reviews from Glass door or other companies, along with the details of what skills the hiring company is looking to acquire.

As this is a relatively new development, what the system will mean is still an open question. To help, members from the Forbes Coaches Council offer their analysis on how the search system will impact candidates or companies. 

1. Provides A One-Stop Shop 

In this information age, it can be challenging for job seekers to wade through online content to locate right-fit opportunities. Google’s new feature will streamline the tedious job search task by intuitively aligning wants with needs, and narrowing search results. It’s a “one-stop shop” for job seekers, drawing relevant job postings into one location and helping employers gain greater visibility.

2. Could Be A Game Changer For Transparent Communications 

If “let me Google my next job” becomes the cornerstone of job search, I predict it will become a game changer in transparent communications between candidates and employers, from candidate application to confirmation of next steps. The pain for candidates is the lack of feedback. If Google can change this, I expect the tech to impact employer brand — hopefully for the better.

3. Reputation Management Will Be Key For Companies 

Google’s new AI-powered job search engine couples job postings with employee ratings from sites like Glass door, so candidates can read reviews about a particular employer before applying for the job. Companies with negative reviews will have a harder time recruiting the right talent, while companies with positive reviews can draw from a larger candidate pool. 

4. Will Create Access, But Not Improve Etiquette 

Good for Google for showing the way to job seekers, but with great access comes great responsibility to better communicate. Without this perspective, job seekers may roll through people, information and create poor communication that could injure their credibility. LinkedIn creates access points and etiquette through InMail. I give them credit. But job seekers still need people skills to win.

5. Expect Competition To Increase

Google jumping into the job search market may make it easier than ever to apply for a role online. For companies, this could likely tax the already strained-ATS system, and unless fixed, could mean many more resumes falling into that “black hole.” For candidates, competition might be steeper than ever, which means networking will be even more important to job search success. 

6. Provides A Move Towards Closing The Wage Gap 

Google is empowering both employers and candidates to move towards equal pay for equal work. It will eliminate silos of information, where pay data has been hidden as it relates to work competencies and experience needed to qualify for positions. Increased access to information and data promotes transparency, and will inevitably cause a shift in compensation.

7. Companies May Have To Get More Creative With Their Strategies 

Google Jobs will impact the career industry in a similar way that its impacted the travel industry. Google will feature their own search tool first, and may feature jobs at Google first. This will force candidates and companies to be more creative with their strategies. Companies may want to post jobs on Google and on other top job sites. Candidates will want to apply in more than one spot. 

8. Makes A Challenging Part Of Life Easier 

Finding the right job fit is equally challenging for candidates and companies. The new Google job search feature will make it easier to bring both together by reducing duplicate postings, and helping both candidates and companies find a match that may have otherwise been missed. I believe one of the greatest benefits is the ability to pick up on social and work experiences via Facebook, LinkedIn and Gmail.

9. Aids Human Resource Management 

Hiring the right people is a hard task, especially if HR managers are bombarded with thousands of CVs. Sometimes, implicit biases can creep into the job interviewing process, and qualified candidates might be overlooked. AI can give a boost to hiring strategy by helping HR specialists identify the best candidates for a position and thereby decreasing human subjectivity and error in decision-making.

10. Understanding Keywords And Trending Topics Will Be Essential 

Since Google’s AI is based on crowd-gathered metrics, the importance of keywords and understanding trending topics is essential for both employers and candidates. Standing out from the crowd or getting relevant results will be determined by how well you speak the expected language of the AI. Optimizing for the search engine’s results pages will make or break your search for a job or candidate. 

11. Companies Will Test The Waters Before Committing To The Process 

Both employers and employees will test this first. If the Google system gives off high-quality search results, then recruiters or job searchers will save a ton of time and money to find their best match. If not, and search results are not qualified or any other complication shows up — for example, you can’t reach either party — people will just go back to their old ways. So we must wait and see!

12. Candidates Will Be Less Likely To Miss Opportunities, Even If They’re Not Actively Looking 

The new Google AI feature streamlines the job search process and delivers greater simplicity to active job seekers, while simultaneously creating a new temptation for non-job seekers who will receive notice of jobs openings they weren’t looking for. Candidates are less likely to miss available job opportunities and will be able to use the data-rich Google profiles to apply for a tailor-fit role.

Source: http://bit.ly/2idHXsy

Why employee engagement matters – and 4 ways to build it up!!

As you know, employee engagement is an important factor in how well organizations function. But how important is it, really? Joe Wedgwood of The Happiness Index answers that question using the latest research on engagement — and he provides some helpful tips on how to improve engagement in your organization.

Organizations with high employee engagement levels outperform their low engagement counterparts in total shareholder returns and higher annual net income.” — Kenexa.

Your people are undoubtedly your greatest asset. You may have the best product in the world, but if you can’t keep them engaged and motivated — then it counts for very little.

By making efforts to keep your people engaged, you will maximize your human capital investment and witness your efforts being repaid exponentially.

The benefits of an engaged workforce

1. Increase in profitability: 

Increasing employee engagement investments by 10% can increase profits by $2,400 per employee, per year.” — Workplace Research Foundation.

 There is a wealth of research to suggest that companies that focus on employee engagement will have an emotionally invested and committed workforce. This tends to result in higher profitability rates and shareholder returns. The more engaged your employees are the more efficient and productive they become. This will help lower operating costs and increase profit margins.

An engaged workforce will be more committed and driven to help your business succeed. By focusing on engagement and investing in your people’s future, you will create a workforce that will generate more income for your business.

2. Improved retention and recruitment rates:

“Replacing employees who leave can cost up to 150% of the departing employee’s salary. Highly engaged organizations have the potential to reduce staff turnover by 87%; the disengaged are four times more likely to leave the organization than the average employee.” — Corporate Leadership Council

Retaining good employees is vital for organizational success. Engaged employees are much less likely to leave, as they will be committed to their work and invested in the success of the company. They will have an increased chance of attracting more qualified people.

Ultimately the more engaged your people are, the higher their productivity and workplace satisfaction will be. This will significantly reduce costs around absences, recruitment, training and time lost for interviews and onboarding.

3. Boost in workplace happiness:

“Happy employees are 12%t more productive than the norm, and 22% more productive than their unhappy peers. Creating a pleasant workplace full of happy people contributes directly to the bottom line.” – Inc.

Engaged employees are happy employees, and happy employees are productive employees. A clear focus on workplace happiness, will help you to unlock everyone’s true potential. On top of this, an engaged and happy workforce can also become loyal advocates for your company. This is evidenced by the Corporate Leadership Council, “67% of engaged employees were happy to advocate their organizations compared to only 3% of the disengaged.”

4. Higher levels of productivity:

“Employees with the highest levels of commitment perform 20% better than employees with lower levels of commitment.” — The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).

Often your most engaged people will be the most dedicated and productive, which will give your bottom line a positive boost. Employees who are engaged with their role and align with the culture are more productive as they are looking beyond personal benefits. Put simply, they will work with the overall success of the organization in mind and performance will increase.

5. More innovation:

“Employee engagement plays a central role in translating additional job resources into innovative work behaviour.” — J.J. Hakanen.

Employee engagement and innovation are closely linked. Disengaged employees will not have the desire to work innovatively and think of new ways to improve your business; whereas an engaged workforce will perform at a higher level, due to increased levels of satisfaction and interest in their role. This often breeds creativity and innovation.

If your people are highly engaged they will be emotionally invested in your business. This can result in them making efforts to share ideas and innovations with you that can lead to the creation of new services and products — thus improving employee profitability.

5 Practices That Make Workplaces Flourish

Employees are the essential building block of any organization.  In today’s workplace, focusing on organizational outcomes is only one part of the success equation; organizations need to also prioritize employee well-being in order to be sustainable. The combination of the two leads to a psychologically healthy workplace where an organization(a) establishes trust and respect among its members; (b) values employee contributions; (c) communicates regularly with its employees; and (d) takes employee needs into account when creating new initiatives.

Over the past decade, researchers have identified five practices that regularly emerge in a psychologically healthy workplace:

PRACTICE 1: EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT AND AUTONOMY

Employees who are highly autonomous are self-governed and have a great deal of say in how they spend their time and the types of projects they accept. Having an autonomy-supportive supervisor or manager is strongly tied to well-being, while working with a boss with a more controlling style is predictably de-motivating. Importantly, autonomy-support can be taught and research shows that even formerly controlling teachers can be trained to provide better autonomy support to students. Businesses that supported an autonomous environment grew at four times the rate of control-oriented companies and had one-third the turnover.

Leaders can become more autonomy-supportive by showing responsiveness to people’s perspectives, using non-controlling language, and offering opportunities for choice.

PRACTICE 2: WORK-LIFE INTEGRATION

At most organizations, the idea of having some type of work-life balance is a myth. I see this frequently in my work with lawyers and law firms. One respondent to a survey of more than 400 lawyers who have left at least one legal employer said, “I was missing out on a lot of life to make my billable hours requirement. To retain me, the firm would have had to totally rethink its business model and do away with a culture of billable hours and bravado.” Many firms have implemented flexible work policies, but the success has been mixed. According to this same survey, nearly 74 percent of lawyers who said they tried working part time felt stigmatized in some way.

Work and personal time are blended for most busy professionals, so why not acknowledge that and provide employees with greater flexibility? Specifically, organizations can include employees’ significant others in after-work activities, use the workplace as a conduit for connecting employees to non-profits in their community and express appreciation directly to an employee’s family.

PRACTICE 3: EMPLOYEE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Mastery is your desire to get better and better at something that matters to you. Law schools and law firms can promote a sense of mastery by allowing students and lawyers, respectively, to have more flow experiences. Flow is a term coined by psychologist Mihalyi Csikszentmihalyi to describe a person’s optimal balance between boredom (the task falls short of our capabilities) and anxiety (the task exceeds our capabilities).  It is the mental state where people feel like they’re “in the zone,” engaged and working in their sweet spot. In addition to creating the opportunity for more flow experiences, managers can remove barriers to effective performance and provide regular feedback.

PRACTICE 4: EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION

My first year of law school was a wholly unpleasant experience. I had no idea what I was doing, my professors were teaching me a new way to think about issues based on fact patterns in archaic cases, and I was burned out. I clerked for a judge during the summer after my first year, and my confidence was at an all-time low. He assigned me a complex project that required a lot of time and effort, and after I turned it in for his review, he left me this note: “The Wrigley report was excellent. Keep up the good work.” I still have that note tacked on a bulletin board, because it gave me the confidence to think that I might actually be able to practice law.

PRACTICE 5: HEALTH AND SAFETY

This practice includes programs that encourage and support healthy lifestyle and behavior choices, like nutritious meals, smoking cessation programs, and onsite fitness facilities; however, it also includes psychological safety. In her early research, Harvard Business School professor, Amy Edmondson, looked at team dynamics in hospitals. When she reviewed her data, she noticed what appeared to be an odd trend – that the nurses who had good relationships with their colleagues seemed to make more errors. What Edmondson eventually discovered was that the nurses in the tight knit groups didn’t make more errors, they reported more errors. Why? They felt psychologically safe in doing so.   When a work environment feels psychologically safe, failure and mistakes are viewed as part of the learning process. When the consequences of reporting a mistake become too severe, employees simply avoid acknowledging mistakes at all.

Source: http://bit.ly/2vdwFK1

Seven Ways To Change Your Hiring Approach

For employers in New York, October 2017 marks the beginning of the ban of the dreaded “salary question” — that is, it will soon be illegal to ask job candidates what their current or most recent salary is when they apply for a job. In Massachusetts, this same law will go into effect next year, and several other states are considering similar legislation.

This measure is good news for both sides of the hiring equation: Candidates won’t be judged or underpaid based on their previous employer’s salary standards, and companies can ensure that they’re hiring the best talent at fair market value, without unintentionally (or intentionally) discriminating against anyone.

But some employers still do ask about salary in job interviews, and if you’re one of them, there’s a good chance you may have to reevaluate the way you value and compensate certain roles. 

The team has asked seven members of the Forbes Human Resources Council to each share one tactical change HR departments can make to ensure they’re not only in compliance with the law, but compensate their teams more fairly.

1. Focus More On The Value of Talent:

When it comes to determining salary, hiring managers sometimes focus too much on the immediate impact on payroll and the bottom line, but compensation should focus more on the talent and experience of the individual, the uplift they will bring to the company and the salary figures for comparable roles in the market. Being competitive in the hiring market means investing in your team. 

2. Use Validated Market Data:

Asking a candidate about their salary history is a surefire way to underpay an employee for the job or discriminate, even without realizing it. Validated market data should be used to set the salary range for your position, then you should pay at market. Many factors can manipulate the reason someone was paid differently before. Benchmark your job, then pay employees what they are worth!

3. Analyze Your Costs And ROI:

HR should think like a business owner analyzing the costs and ROI of a major acquisition. In this case, it’s talent acquisition. This means we gather and analyze data: salary market data, economic data for the market to be hired in and impact of unemployment data on the hiring process for the area. When speaking to leadership, utilize the data and your analysis to make compensation recommendations. 

4. Focus On Salary Expectations, Not History:

HR and hiring managers will need to focus more on salary expectations rather than salary history. Although employers can no longer ask job candidates for their salary history, they are still allowed to ask the candidate for their desired salary. HR will need to re-evaluate their application questions and provide proper interview training for managers to avoid litigation.

5. Match Offers To Skills And Competencies:

Excluding salary histories will force us to know fair market value for roles and match offers to skills and competencies rather than salary history. We may offer some more, we’ll offer others less (and they may decline), but we’re more likely to build teams where compensation and skills are aligned. That’s a step toward ensuring the best employees are rewarded the most for their contribution.

6. Determine Every Position’s Value:

When the law takes effect in October, HR will be required to determine each open position’s value to the company. This will take additional effort on the part of HR departments, especially if they are struggling with constructing effective job descriptions. Then the salary is based on the candidate’s qualifications, past experience and demand for filling the position, rather than on salary history.

7. Take A Holistic Approach To Meet Company And Candidate Needs:

It means we have to change our talk track and adjust the way we discuss compensation, by having holistic conversations about the targeted compensation range for specific positions while also ensuring that the range meets the needs of the candidate. A candidate’s past salary history is not indicative of what they are worth; it’s more about what the market compensates for a particular position.

Source: http://bit.ly/2eVnrMd