5 BODY LANGUAGE DISASTERS JOB SEEKERS MAKE DURING AN INTERVIEW

Not making eye contact

Failing to make eye contact was the body language mistake interviewers were most likely to say they hated. Sixty-seven percent of people surveyed said they didn’t like it when candidates kept their eyes cast down. While you don’t want to get into a creepy staring contest with your interviewer, looking at them while listening and speaking shows you’re engaged in the conversation

Playing with something on the table

Thirty-four percent of hiring managers cited fiddling with pens or shuffling papers as a major example of poor body language in an interview. Clicking a pen or similar gestures can be interpreted as a sign of anxiety.

Crossing your arms

Crossing your arms in front of your chest makes you look defensive and hostile, so it’s no wonder that 32% of HR managers said this was not something they liked to see in people they interviewed.

Not sitting up straight

Slumping in your seat doesn’t convey confidence. Thirty-one percent of HR experts said it made candidates look less than polished in an interview. Sitting up straight and squaring your shoulders not only makes you look confident, but it also shows you respect your interviewer and the situation you’re in.

Using too many hand gestures

The higher the gesture, the more out-of-control you look. The key in an interview is balance: Some hand movement keeps you from coming off as too stiff, but too much and you could look like a loose cannon.

Commonly asked questions in Interviews

commonly asked questions

If you are going for your first interview, you will be anxious to know what questions they are going to ask you and what you will answer. The key in acing your interview is by answering those questions in the right way.

here are some of the questions that most Employers ask while hiring for their Company.

So tell me about yourself

We assure you that you will come across this question and the best way to answer this is by shortening your life story and by being conscience about what is relevant to getting you that job. Start with saying your name, where you are from, what you are doing/studying and why you are here for this interview.

Why do you want to work here?

Don’t be rash and say something like “I need money to pay back my loans or I need this job for my visa status “say something that connects your needs with the companies need. Do a research on why the company is looking for candidates and relate to what they are looking for.

What are your greatest strengths?

Keep this as job related as possible by relating to a job or skill that you know to be an asset of yours. “I like traveling and making new friends” is not a good answer.

What are you greatest weakness?

This question is asked to test your honesty. However, you don’t have to be too blunt in explaining all your weakness. If you don’t know how to use some software or have less experience in a field, let them know that.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

For this question, don’t give out any naïve answers. Say what you would achieve with this company or what post you want to hone by then. “I hope to have enhanced my experience in this field and hopefully I am working on bigger projects by then”

Tell me about a time you faced a challenge

Everyone must have faced a challenge at some point in your life. Talk about why you had that challenge and what you did to bounce back from it. You can also talk about what you had learned from this experience. Avoid answering anything over confident like “I have not faced any challenges yet”.

 

Ten Most Common Interview Questions

interview questions

Tell me about yourself

This means: “Give me a broad overview of who you are, professionally speaking, before we dive into specifics.” You should prepare about a one-minute answer that summarizes where you are in your career and what you’re especially good at, with an emphasis on your most recent job. Keep your personal life out of it; your interviewer isn’t asking to hear about your family, hobbies or where you grew up.

What interests you about this job?

Focus on the substance of the role and how it interests you. Don’t talk about benefits, salary, the short commute or anything else unrelated to the day-to-day work you’d be doing, or you’ll signal that you’re not particularly enthusiastic about the work itself. Interviewers want to hire people who have carefully considered whether this is a job they’d be glad to do every day, and that means focusing on the work itself – not what the job can do for you.

Why did you leave your last job?

Don’t discuss conflicts with your manager or co-workers, complain about your work or badmouth employers. Job seekers are commonly advised to say they’re seeking new challenges, but that only works if you’re specific about those new challenges and how this job will provide them in a way your last job didn’t. It’s also fine to cite things like a recent or planned move, financial instability at your organization or other reasons that are true.

Why would you excel at this job?

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10 Interview Question That can Be asked During Interview

interview questions

1. Brief about yourself

This is the most common question asked by the employer to know about the background of the employee. In this question employer expects something that is not written in your resume as they already have gone through it and shortlisted it from the pool of resumes. Tell something that will stand you out from other candidates. You can start with your strong points and making sure that it is related to the job profile.

2.Why company should hire you?

Kailash Shahani recommends not to get panic with the question instead feel confident and explain the employer at your best as why you are fit for this position. This is the best question to put before the employer your positive points and your enthusiasm to work in the company for the required job profile.

3. Explain your goals and what you did to achieve it?

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