How to Show Culture Fit in an Interview!!

Ask a hiring manager which top qualities they’re looking for in candidates, and culture fit is bound to be up there. It’s no surprise — research shows that hiring for culture fit leads to reduced turnover, cost savings and happier, more productive employees, so it’s definitely in a company’s best interest to find somebody who’s a good match.

But job seekers are often at a loss for how to show culture fit during an interview.  And although it can indeed be difficult, it’s far from impossible — you just need to follow a few best practices first.

1. Do Your Homework

The first step in demonstrating culture fit is actually knowing what a company’s culture entails. According to Megan Nunan, Career Specialist at Ama La Vida, “Culture fit sums up all the ‘extras’ about a company that you can’t classify into one bucket. Things like do you align with their values, do you mesh well with those already hired at the firm, could you thrive in the current environment, etc.” Luckily, you can find much of this through your own research before the interview even rolls around.

“Look at what they post about on social media, look at pictures of the office and people working there. These will all give you clues as to what they value and what the company’s culture is like,” she says. “It also never hurts to ask around — if you know someone that either works at the firm or knows someone that works there, taking them out for a quick coffee could be the best investment you’ll ever make in yourself.”

2. Get Introspective & Rehearse

As you learn about a company’s values, work style, office environment, etc., you’ll want to think about how those match your own. Not only will this help you identify whether or not the company is the right fit for you — it’ll also give you an idea of what points you’ll want to touch on during an interview. For example, if you’re interviewing at a startup and you realize that you’re highly independent, self-motivated and excel at working at a fast pace, you’ll want to proactively highlight all of those factors in your answers.

In order to do that, you may want to research some of the most commonly asked interview questions and think about how you plan on answering them.

“There are an endless number of cultural fit questions like, ‘what kind of corporate environment do you thrive in, who was your best boss and why, what do you love about your current job,’” Nunan says. “The key to answering these successfully is to first take the time to reflect on the type of company culture that best suits you and then answer in a way that shows you’re intentional about your desire to work at this firm and that your values align nicely with those of the organization.”

And remember: the more you rehearse the answers to those questions (yes, I mean aloud!), the more comfortable you’ll be when it comes time for the actual interview.

3. Dress the Part

When you show up for an interview, you want your outfit to be appropriate — but remember, “interview-appropriate” will have different meanings at different companies.

4. Ask Questions

The idea of having to ask questions in an interview can be stressful — after all, shouldn’t answering their questions be enough? But really, you should think of it as an opportunity. It’s a great way to get a sense of how things operate day to day and, perhaps even more importantly, prove how you would fit in there.

5. Be Honest

Demonstrating culture fit is important, but even more important is finding a job and company that fit your life. After all, if you’re going to spend 40+ hours a week there, you’ll want to enjoy it.

The perfect job and company are out there somewhere, so don’t feel like you need to force it. Odds are, when you do find the right opportunity, you (and the interviewer) will know.

QUALITIES THAT HR IS LOOKING IN NEW HIRES

QUALITIES THAT HR IS LOOKING IN NEW HIRES

Here are the some key qualities That HR look out in the new hires to ensure longevity of the tenure.

  1.  Endurance:

Turnovers can be expensive for HR. Hence the foremost qualities they look for in new hires are endurance, commitment and prospect of longevity of the tenure.

  1.  Team player:

Anybody can work in silos but it takes a lot of perseverance and high levels of patience and gratitude to work as a team player. Incidentally, all these qualities make for a good employee itself.

  1.   Ambitious:

Motivated and self-driven people are an asset to any organization. Ambitious employees work hard and try to surpass their own excellence, which in turn benefits the organization at large. Who doesn’t want to hire such employees?

  1.   Trustworthy:

Trust is a very tricky characteristic to identify in an employee. An employee who is true in his/her work and dependable is sure to have long-term benefits for the organizations and is most likely to stick around for long.

  1.    Positive attitude:

They say, if you have a positive attitude in life you are a sure winner. Organizations look out for such employees because they know such employees can stand up to failure and competition with much confidence.

  1.  Multi-tasking skills:

Businesses often resort to cost cutting by having fewer employees who can multi-task. With growing competition, multi-tasking is one of the desired quality HR looks for in new hires.

5 BODY LANGUAGE DISASTERS JOB SEEKERS MAKE DURING AN INTERVIEW

Not making eye contact

Failing to make eye contact was the body language mistake interviewers were most likely to say they hated. Sixty-seven percent of people surveyed said they didn’t like it when candidates kept their eyes cast down. While you don’t want to get into a creepy staring contest with your interviewer, looking at them while listening and speaking shows you’re engaged in the conversation

Playing with something on the table

Thirty-four percent of hiring managers cited fiddling with pens or shuffling papers as a major example of poor body language in an interview. Clicking a pen or similar gestures can be interpreted as a sign of anxiety.

Crossing your arms

Crossing your arms in front of your chest makes you look defensive and hostile, so it’s no wonder that 32% of HR managers said this was not something they liked to see in people they interviewed.

Not sitting up straight

Slumping in your seat doesn’t convey confidence. Thirty-one percent of HR experts said it made candidates look less than polished in an interview. Sitting up straight and squaring your shoulders not only makes you look confident, but it also shows you respect your interviewer and the situation you’re in.

Using too many hand gestures

The higher the gesture, the more out-of-control you look. The key in an interview is balance: Some hand movement keeps you from coming off as too stiff, but too much and you could look like a loose cannon.

Commonly asked questions in Interviews

commonly asked questions

If you are going for your first interview, you will be anxious to know what questions they are going to ask you and what you will answer. The key in acing your interview is by answering those questions in the right way.

here are some of the questions that most Employers ask while hiring for their Company.

So tell me about yourself

We assure you that you will come across this question and the best way to answer this is by shortening your life story and by being conscience about what is relevant to getting you that job. Start with saying your name, where you are from, what you are doing/studying and why you are here for this interview.

Why do you want to work here?

Don’t be rash and say something like “I need money to pay back my loans or I need this job for my visa status “say something that connects your needs with the companies need. Do a research on why the company is looking for candidates and relate to what they are looking for.

What are your greatest strengths?

Keep this as job related as possible by relating to a job or skill that you know to be an asset of yours. “I like traveling and making new friends” is not a good answer.

What are you greatest weakness?

This question is asked to test your honesty. However, you don’t have to be too blunt in explaining all your weakness. If you don’t know how to use some software or have less experience in a field, let them know that.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

For this question, don’t give out any naïve answers. Say what you would achieve with this company or what post you want to hone by then. “I hope to have enhanced my experience in this field and hopefully I am working on bigger projects by then”

Tell me about a time you faced a challenge

Everyone must have faced a challenge at some point in your life. Talk about why you had that challenge and what you did to bounce back from it. You can also talk about what you had learned from this experience. Avoid answering anything over confident like “I have not faced any challenges yet”.

 

Ten Most Common Interview Questions

interview questions

Tell me about yourself

This means: “Give me a broad overview of who you are, professionally speaking, before we dive into specifics.” You should prepare about a one-minute answer that summarizes where you are in your career and what you’re especially good at, with an emphasis on your most recent job. Keep your personal life out of it; your interviewer isn’t asking to hear about your family, hobbies or where you grew up.

What interests you about this job?

Focus on the substance of the role and how it interests you. Don’t talk about benefits, salary, the short commute or anything else unrelated to the day-to-day work you’d be doing, or you’ll signal that you’re not particularly enthusiastic about the work itself. Interviewers want to hire people who have carefully considered whether this is a job they’d be glad to do every day, and that means focusing on the work itself – not what the job can do for you.

Why did you leave your last job?

Don’t discuss conflicts with your manager or co-workers, complain about your work or badmouth employers. Job seekers are commonly advised to say they’re seeking new challenges, but that only works if you’re specific about those new challenges and how this job will provide them in a way your last job didn’t. It’s also fine to cite things like a recent or planned move, financial instability at your organization or other reasons that are true.

Why would you excel at this job?

Read More

10 Interview Question That can Be asked During Interview

interview questions

1. Brief about yourself

This is the most common question asked by the employer to know about the background of the employee. In this question employer expects something that is not written in your resume as they already have gone through it and shortlisted it from the pool of resumes. Tell something that will stand you out from other candidates. You can start with your strong points and making sure that it is related to the job profile.

2.Why company should hire you?

Kailash Shahani recommends not to get panic with the question instead feel confident and explain the employer at your best as why you are fit for this position. This is the best question to put before the employer your positive points and your enthusiasm to work in the company for the required job profile.

3. Explain your goals and what you did to achieve it?

Read More