5 Mistakes You Already Make Before Job Interview

job-interview-tips

Assuming They’ve Researched You

You’ve worked very hard creating a resume that speaks to your accomplishments and you’ve peppered your cover letter with strategies on how you can add value to the company, but that doesn’t mean your interviewer has read most of it or even part of it.  We’ve heard numerous reports that employers only spend between 6 and 30 seconds looking at resumes so don’t be surprised if your interviewer pulls out your resume, cover letter, blog posts, or anything else attached to your name right there in your interview.

Rehearsing Run-of-the-mill Questions

It’s all well and good to ask what the typical work week is like, but how far will asking common questions really get you?  Show your interest in the company and get down to the nitty-gritty.  Research all the company’s channels including website, social media outlets, what is being said within the industry and in the news, and come up with questions that will really impress your interviewer.

You’ve Set a Time Limit

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Top 7 Job Interview Mistakes

interview mistakes

Appearing Uninterested

You should be attentive not only with your physical appearance but intellectually also. Taking actively part in a conversation, sitting up straight and being kind to the receptionist all these things are counted when you appear somewhere for interview process. Also make sure you are not interrupting the interviewer with your query. Save it till the interviewer doesn’t complete his part of speech.

Take Good Time before answering the question

Interviewer wants to understand your knowledge in the short span of time so you need to think before you speak. Many candidates jump to the first thing they think of because they feel like they need to respond at the earliest. And blurting out anything that comes out first in your mind is not always a good option.

Bad Mouth about Previous Employers

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10 Tips Of Writing Perfect Resume

Resume Tips

There is a ton of advice out there related to resume writing; some more practical than others. However, I have noticed a noticeable lack of advice related to how job seekers should systematically review and improve their resume on a line by line basis, as part of a broader strategy to assist them in their interviews. Your first interview is actually your resume being submitted to an employer. Nothing else matters if an employer does not like you or understand you on paper. Now that we have addressed the general way in which one may approach writing one’s resume, I present ten specific rules to live by for resume writing.

1) Telling Ain’t Selling

Don’t tell the readers of your resume what you did; show them what you achieved. Your resume, as much as possible, should in essence be an outline of what you would ideally get the opportunity to say about yourself in the course of an interview. In the course of highlighting your achievements, you implicitly also show your experiences, but do so in a much sexier way. To that end, make sure to avoid vague words like assisted, planned, developed, and other similar words you might use to describe your achievements. For every action word you use make sure to ask yourself “how precisely did I?”; as in “how precisely did I assist?”, “how precisely did I plan?”, or “how precisely did I develop?”.

2) Resumes Are Intended to Answer Basic Questions About You. They Do Not Create More of Them

A resume is a snapshot into your career history, your qualifications and achievements. The reader should come away with absolutely no doubt as to who you worked for, when you worked there, what the company did and where (geographically) you worked. The why and the how of your jobs can be explained in a cover letter if you are uncomfortable stating the circumstances of your job changes on your resume. Put yourself in the mindset of someone that might not possibly have any knowledge of your current or previous employers, your industries, or your company’s/industry’s unique jargon and/or acronyms.

3) You Can Eliminate the Objective Section on Your Resume 

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High-Level Interview Preparation

interview tips

Here is what you should be doing in preparation for, and during, high-level interviews:

Do extensive background research

You should always go into an interview for a senior level job knowing specifics about the company, such as details about recent projects, the company’s finances, its marketing strategies and any challenges it is facing. Know the backgrounds of those with whom you’re interviewing as well as the company’s reputation in the industry and within its sector. The more senior the position, the more specifics you want to have. Search for press coverage in business or trade magazines, and get a copy of the company’s prospectus or recruitment pack, which will give you more detailed information than can be found on its website. Armed with this information you will be able to ask informed questions and give thoughtful answers.

Talk about accomplishments, not responsibilities

An interview is not the time to rattle off a list of responsibilities. While that’s important– and should be detailed on your resume– you should be talking about what you have accomplished with those responsibilities in mind. What concrete things have you gotten done during your tenure in your current position?

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5 Clever Ways To Prepare For Job Interview

job-interview-tricks

Go through Job Description Carefully

Most commonly asked interview questions like “Brief about yourself”, “Your strengths and weaknesses”, “Why should we hire you” etc. might be covered in detail by hundreds of other bloggers and in books too. To know what kind of questions you will asked at interview, understand the job description carefully. For example, if it is mentioned in job description that the candidate should have good analytical skills then in such case you can expect question like “Brief about your analytical skills” or if it is written that the applicant should have good command over English (written as well as oral) then in such case obviously the expected question would be to write on any topic (they will either provide you the topic or you can choose any topic of yours).

Use LinkedIn to research the interviewer

Today, every professional person has its LinkedIn profile. So it would be better to research about the interviewer prior job interview. On LinkedIn click on the “Advanced” search and look for the name of the company you are applying to. Don’t forget to check the 1st, 2nd and 3rd connections for wide search. Read More